Roy Beck
AUTHOR

Roy Beck

The son of a milkman and a native of the Ozarks, Roy Howard Beck has been a lifelong observer and promoter of the dignity of fairly compensated work. During an era of tight-labor-markets, his first work experiences were in eight years of first-rung jobs in the occupations of production-line factory welding, bridge construction, hay harvesting, roofing, landscaping, and as a recreation counselor in an inner-urban Boys Club, an office assistant, and as a runner in door-to-door milk delivery. Later, as a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism and reporting at newspapers in Michigan, Ohio, Missouri, and Texas, Roy encountered the urban unrest of the late 1960s, the Great Society’s programs on poverty, racial integration, and urban development in the 1970s, and the growing economic disparities of the 1980s and 1990s, filing reports on economic fairness, environmental sustainability, and the intersection of religion and public policy from dozens of states and 10 countries of Asia, Central and South America, and the Caribbean. He was the Chief Washington Correspondent of the Booth chain of daily newspapers during consideration and passage of the 1990 immigration act. Since 1996 when civil rights icon Barbara Jordan died, Roy has been president of the bipartisan NumbersUSA Education & Research Foundation which he founded in large part to educate on her recommendations and findings as chair of the U.S. Commission on Immigration Reform. He married his wife Shirley, a pediatric physical therapist, in 1970 just before he was drafted into the U.S. Army. They share a half-century of road trips and a home in Arlington, Virginia. Reviews of his previous books include: Washington Post: “Always balanced and never strident . . . Perhaps most cogent is his discussion of the negative impacts immigration has had, historically and contemporaneously, on Black Americans” Business Week: “All sides can learn from Roy Beck. . . . Beck presents a powerful argument that immigration hurts America’s working poor” New York Times: “ . . . fosters serious debate rather than name-calling . . . [analyses are] presented carefully and dispassionately and deserve serious answers” Foreign Affairs Journal: “ . . . as persuasively as anyone, he states the case and marshals the evidence”
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