adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT
adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT

1 audiobook of your choice.
Stream or download thousands of included titles.
$14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $34.99

Buy for $34.99

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

Pulitzer Prize finalist Lydia Millet's sublime new novel - her first since the National Book Award long-listed Sweet Lamb of Heaven - follows a group of 12 eerily mature children on a forced vacation with their families at a sprawling lakeside mansion. 

Contemptuous of their parents, who pass their days in a stupor of liquor, drugs, and sex, the children feel neglected and suffocated at the same time. When a destructive storm descends on the summer estate, the group's ringleaders - including Eve, who narrates the story - decide to run away, leading the younger ones on a dangerous foray into the apocalyptic chaos outside. 

As the scenes of devastation begin to mimic events in the dog-eared picture Bible carried around by her beloved little brother, Eve devotes herself to keeping him safe from harm. 

A Children's Bible is a prophetic, heartbreaking story of generational divide - and a haunting vision of what awaits us on the far side of Revelation.

©2020 Dreamscape Media, LLC (P)2020 Dreamscape Media, LLC

What listeners say about A Children's Bible

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    238
  • 4 Stars
    151
  • 3 Stars
    79
  • 2 Stars
    46
  • 1 Stars
    25
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    259
  • 4 Stars
    113
  • 3 Stars
    44
  • 2 Stars
    15
  • 1 Stars
    18
Story
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    204
  • 4 Stars
    123
  • 3 Stars
    56
  • 2 Stars
    39
  • 1 Stars
    31

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Not sure what to make of this

Wow, this was all over the place. On the one hand, the writing was good. The story was - eh. It was overbaked & got to read like a bad episode of The Walking Dead. I couldn't really care for the characters & by the time this short book ended I was glad. The narrator did as good a job as can be expected with such removed writing. I'm shocked it's so well regarded. Not sure I'd have wasted a credit on it. It was uncomfortable, but not new. These topics have been covered better by other writers.

10 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

What am I missing?

I listened to this after learning the book was one of the top 5 notable 2020 novels picked by the NYT Book Review. It may be the most surprising pick I've ever read from their annual top 10 lists; I can easily imagine how a reviewer might slam it for forcing its story to fit its biblical allusions, treating most characters as predictable types, and then spelling out its message at the end in case you didn't hear it the first 4 times. That said, I did not hate it. The novel's teenage narrator is an interesting voice, more subtle than the characters whose story she tells except for that of "The Owner", who serves as the Jesus figure and whose second coming is an amusing take on what we might really need a savior to be like. I'm open to learning what I missed that makes this a top 5 pick. (The audiobook actress was terrific).

6 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Lydia Millet is a treasure

This book has stayed with me in a way a book has not for a very long time. What will our children inherit from this world we've made for them? How will they remember us? What is happening to our planet now? How will we fit that into our brains? Only in the gauzy magic of this book have I found fully been able to grapple with those questions. Meaningful while still funny, and it lingers....it haunts.

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

What a great book— couldn’t put it down

I read the print edition in one gulp and then quickly downloaded the audiobook. i am now going to inhale everything Lydia Millet has written.

The story reminded me of an old classic called “A High Wind in Jamaica” by Richard Hughes, which was also a “realistic” fantasy about a group of children left to their own devices in the wake of a hurricane— with surprising twists and turns. Millet is a master at it, and the emotions she evokes— from real pathos to stinging satire— are brilliant. It’s more prescient than she probably knew when she composed her first draft.

The reason why I’m writing a review here, though, is because of the “bad” reviews. They are a disingenuous reaction that arose when the book won so much critical recognition, and was named one of the best of the year. Taking the “title” literally, a group of pious Christians without a scintilla of humor, were horrified to see this story is a skeptical, blasphemous, look under the hood, People who think children (and women) should be seen and not heard— saw the title and thought this was going to be the equivalent of a parish newsletter. No, it is not! (LOL) It is satiric, dystopian, sensitive, nuanced, allegorical, and a cautionary tale about climate change and our own species’ moral failings. Yes, FOX NEWS would hate this book. So if that’s you, just keep fiddling your tiny violin, and reading your narcissism romances.

So back to the book’s natural audience. None of “the Children’s Bible” is pedantic... not at all. It’s literary fiction in all its glory! Millet held me in the palm of her hand. I never would have fallen in love, if it had been preachy or dull. It’s beautiful, and you will fall in love with these kids, identify with them, and even the precarious adults around them. You will laugh as the world ends, and cry, and not be able to turn away. I couldnt’ bear it when it ended.

Xi was inspired casting. She sounds exactly like I thought Evie would!

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Better than Tartt

Precocious and world-weary kids, post-Apocalypse, Zombie free-love parents, all set against a Bible parable backdrop -- what's not to like? This is what The Goldfinch or Secret History could have been.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Underdeveloped

This is an underdeveloped idea with an underdeveloped narrative. The author had an idea for a story but failed to develop it. You will get to feel this at two levels. First, the plot is full of non sequiturs. Many times i felt like a missed a whole chapter. Second, the narrator is so uninteresting. She comes across as an complete airhead. No interiority whatsoever. I got the impression thya the book was hastily written to.meet some deadline. Maybe she should have missed it.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Save for an easier time

This is a great book , read by my favorite narrator, but in these crazy times it strikes a little too close to home - def worth reading - but maybe wait till easier days are with us

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

narrator's voice perfect for story

among the best I've heard

great great great great great great great great great great great great great great fantastic

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

crazy journey, but an fabulous read.

I loved this story, partly because it was a delightful adventure, but also because the narrator was so good.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Stunning and beautiful

I am unable to explain the story although it’s one we all know. Wonderful and thought provoking

1 person found this helpful

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 09-06-20

A warning for millenials

I loved it. If you think it's the boomers who need these warnings, or that it is the boomers who are represented by the parents in this book, think again. By making the parents artists, professors, engineers, left wing feminist academics, Millet really drives home that actually, it is millenials who are doomed to be the 'did-nothing' generation in the "war" gainst climate change. Will we as individuals do anything, no matter how futile it seems, or will we just sit back and live our lives doing exactly as we wanted. A must read, especially for those thinking of having children. It is good to read alongside The Wall.