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Publisher's Summary

A Girl of the Limberlost, a novel by the writer and naturalist Gene Stratton-Porter, was published in 1909 as the sequel to her earlier novel Freckles. The tale unfolds in and around the Limberlost Swamp of north-eastern Indiana and in the nearby town of Onabasha. The main character, Elnora Comstock, lives with her widowed mother, Katharine Comstock, on the edge of the wetlands. The embittered Katharine blames her daughter for the death of her husband, who was swallowed by quicksand. To make a living, Elnora collects and sells moths to collectors...and eventually, things work together to heal the family.

Public Domain (P)2019 Museum Audiobooks

What listeners say about A Girl of the Limberlost

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Returning to a childhood favorite

Reading this book for the first time more than 65 years ago, I wanted to see if its magic was still there. in 2020, I chose an reading option not available in 1952: an audiobook.
Today, I see it is very dated novel as reflected in the dialogue between characters and in the culture of the times. The same story written today would be very different because writing style and conversation have changed. The magic of the story is still the Limberlost Swamp and the insects and creatures that live there... and a main character who is in perfect harmony with it. The setting still draws the reader in, child or adult.

The narrator, however, does not. Her attempts at a southern accent is inauthentic and whiney to the point of irritation. Just as publishers selecting a narrator for a book set in Nigeria would have selected a second language English reader with a Nigerian accent, these producers should have selected a narrator from the South.

Do yourself a favor: listen to a sample before buying this audio book or pick another production of it.

Would I recommend this book to a young reader today? I'm not sure, and I say this as a retired children's librarian. I would have to know that the child was a serious nature lover as well as a dedicated reader. That's who I was at 10 but I'm not sure it's still enough.

1 person found this helpful

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My favorite book of childhood.

Many years ago, the summer between my 5th and 6th grade years, my mother read this book and thought I would like it too. It took me all summer to read it as I only read it at night, but from then on it spurred my love of reading. Many years later, while teaching reading, I found the book again and shared my favorite book with my classes. I had many children tell me that this was now their favorite book as it has continued to be my favorite.

This book is much older than I am, written when life was completely different than it is now. A glorious look at America back in the 1900’s. You’ll love Elnora, dislike her mother and come to see how life was lived at the turn of the century Indiana.

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Brought back my girlhood.

I grew up reading Gene Stratton-Porter. The stories are still engaging although they reflect cultural norms of the time.

I don’t think Gene Stratton-Porter has ever been to Mackinac Island. Her description of the Island is very vague. In addition, cars (or motors) were banned as of 1898.

The narrator was fairly competent though some rather obvious mispronunciations such as the way she pronounced cameo accenting the wrong syllable making it sound like Camaro. And the worst sin of all she mispronounced MACKINAC! Being from Michigan this was almost unforgivable. For future reference Mackinac is pronounced the same as Mackinaw. And let’s not forget the awful pronunciation of Petoskey- the “o” is a short “o”. Some of her voice characterizations were spot on others were weak.

A general comment: Don’t readers take the time to learn how to pronounce words they aren’t familiar with?

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Relationships

I enjoyed the dynamics in the relationships. Hearts changing along with perspectives. Warm story of connections with people and nature.

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Story is great, narrator is awful

The narrator is so whiny, especially with the Stintons’ voices. Couldn’t stand listening to it. Wish I hadn’t wasted my money on this version.