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Publisher's Summary

The Washington Post said, "Nobody does smart, gutsy, funny, sexy women better than Susan Isaacs". Add to that praise the adjective "strong", and you've got Susan's latest protagonist, Marianne Kent. Her life may not seem thrilling - living with her widowed mother, majoring in economics, working in an elegant dress store after classes to put away money for graduate school - but she's determined to make a better life for herself and her mom.

One night, she comes home to see the light is out again over the door. That old fuse box? Again? Except when Marianne gets inside, she stumbles over something, and it's immediately clear what has happened: Her mother has been murdered. The NYPD is stumped. Marianne's father, an army captain, was killed in battle when she was a year old, and whatever other family she has are so distant she's never met them. Whom can she turn to? Marianne does what strong women always do: She turns to herself. With help from Laurie Fishbein, her BFF since second grade, she becomes her own private detective to solve the case of her lifetime.

Susan Isaacs was dubbed "Jane Austen with a shmear" on NPR's Fresh Air. Among her 13 novels are Almost Paradise, Shining Through, and After All These Years. She has written screenplays for two films, Compromising Positions (adapted from her novel) and Hello Again, as well as a nonfiction work, Brave Dames and Wimpettes: What Women Are Really Doing on Page and Screen. Currently, she serves as chairman of the literary organization Poets & Writers.

A member of the National Book Critics Circle, she has reviewed for New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Chicago Tribune, the Washington Post, and Newsday. She is a past president of Mystery Writers of America and belongs to the Creative Coalition, PEN, and the International Association of Crime Writers. Susan is a trustee emerita of the Queens College Foundation and on the board of the Jewish Theological Seminary. Among her honors are the John Steinbeck award, the Writers for Writers award, and the Marymount Manhattan Writing Center prize. She has worked gathering support for the National Endowment of the Arts Literature Program and on many anticensorship campaigns. She lives on Long Island, where she's at work finishing her new novel, Violet Hopkins.

©2015 Susan Isaacs (P)2018 Audible, Inc.

What listeners say about A Hint of Strangeness

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A 50’s Nancy Drew in Queens NY

I’ve never read any other Susan Isaacs books before so I had no idea what to expect. I loved everything about this book immediately- the intelligent and self possessed heroine, her very “Queens” friends and neighbors, and the late 50’s (early 60’s?) setting. It reminded me a lot of Nancy Drew books but more modern and urban. It’s jam packed with quick dialogue and interesting descriptions very specific to the period and location. The narrator is fantastic. It was like listening to an old time radio drama. The mystery is almost secondary and it’s not one of those stories that dramatically explains everything at the end like Agatha Christie, but I had a ton of fun anyway.

3 people found this helpful

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Interesting story

The story was interesting. Drawn out a bit but I did listen until the end.

1 person found this helpful

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Usually expect much more from Susan Issacs.

Usually expect much more from Susan Issacs. narration was unconvincing. as was main character. Ending was just crammed in. Think it might have been a case of early writing that got dusted off after she became popular (and usually) good story teller.

1 person found this helpful

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A hint of strangeness

I thought this audio book was going to be ridiculous, but I enjoyed it. it was a murder mystery that had some interesting clues and a story to it.

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Couldn't tolerate narrator

I gave this up to early to give it a fair review for Contant the narrator made me crazy.

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Just So

I love Susan Isaac's writing and was pleasantly surprised by this novel since it has been some time since I last read anything by her. Set in the early 1960s, this is an amusing little number with an amusing protagonist and I adore her mind. The story moves quickly and you'll be out amused and entertained by the writing.

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A great short stiry

This story kept me riveted the entire time from the beginning to the end. And the descriptions of the 60s clothes and events took me back vividly. I love Susan Isaacs.

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A great short story

Excellently narrated story about a young intelligent lady who with good manners and street smarts helps solve a crime. Very enjoyable

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stay away

only thing worse than the story was the horrible narration . st least i font have to go thru the steps to return it.

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Meh

I don’t know what bothered me more, the writing or the narrator. She sounded like she was trying to voice for Sesame Street and all the men sounded like Oscar the Grouch’s mom. The story was unremarkable, but the writing was cringeworthy here and there. ‘Stretched across his breasts’ gave me a very odd visual. I don’t think she was trying to describe a transgender man. The whole thing was just not great.