Try our newest plan – access a growing selection of included Audible Originals, audiobooks, and podcasts.
You will get an email reminder before your trial ends.
Your Plus plan is $7.95 a month after 30 day trial. Upgrade or cancel anytime.
Buy for $18.16

Buy for $18.16

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

Being the new kid at school is hard, but Sophie has a secret weapon: her vivid imagination and her oversized, trusted Big Book of Monsters, an encyclopedia of myths and legends from all over the world. The pictures and descriptions of the creatures in her book help her know which kids to watch out for - clearly the bullies are trolls and goblins - as well as how to avoid them. Though not everyone is hiding a monster inside; the nice next-door neighbor is probably a good witch, and Sophie's new best friend is obviously a good fairy. 

Sophie is convinced she is a monster because of the monster mark on her face. At least that's what she calls it. The doctors call it a blood tumor, and it covers almost half of her face. Sophie can feel it pulsing with every beat of her heart. And if she's a monster on the outside, then she must be a monster on the inside, too. She knows that it's only a matter of time before the other kids, the doctors, and even her mom figure it out. 

The Big Book of Monsters gives Sophie the idea that there might be a cure for her monster mark, but in order to make the magic work, she'll need to create a special necklace made from ordinary items: a feather, a shell, and a crystal that Sophie believes are talismans. Once she's collected all the needed ingredients, she'll only have one chance to make a very special wish. If Sophie can't break the curse and become human again, her mom is probably going to leave just like Dad did. Because who would want to live with a real monster?

©2019 Wendy S. Swore (P)2019 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What listeners say about A Monster Like Me

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    268
  • 4 Stars
    63
  • 3 Stars
    24
  • 2 Stars
    6
  • 1 Stars
    4
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    244
  • 4 Stars
    62
  • 3 Stars
    9
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    2
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    236
  • 4 Stars
    54
  • 3 Stars
    20
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    7

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Both emotionally gripping and heartwarming

This story fascinates me. I'm still thinking about it days later.
It straddles the border between contemporary fiction and fantasy. It reads like fantasy and feels like fantasy. Only it isn't. Or is it? There was just enough ambiguity at the end that I can't say for certain.
The story is great. A little more emotionally heavy at points than the book 'Wonder' which I keep seeing it be compared to. We really travel along with the main character into the depths of her emotional unraveling.
I will say, though, that this books has a DEEPLY satisfying, very happy ending, which is exactly what I like. It ended with everything I could hope for and left me feeling really good. I highly recommend giving it a listen.

7 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Wow! Just Wow!

I was amazed at how the author of A Monster a Like Me was able to reach down inside and pull out all the emotions and fears of a child who thinks they are different and paint a visual picture of them so that not only Sophie, but every child who has ever felt that way before, can see them for what they are. Then she masterfully shows how to let go of those deep negative emotions and replace them with positivity and love. Every child feels like they are different sometimes. This book is great for everyone! My kids loved it!!

6 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Learning to Know Oneself

This story was really cute. It had so many good ideas about learning about our selves. Learning to rely on friends and family. I was a bit surprised the mom didn't know more about what Sophie was doing and thinking. How the mom indulged some if the fantasies and didn't acknowledge that she may be helping with some of the stress. But, overall the love the mom had for Sophie and her willingness to acknowledge the struggles were great. The biggest thing with this story is the same charactee is the protagonist and antagonist. Isn't that how most of us are in the story of our own lives?

The Audible version if this with was great. The performance was very well done.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

troubling

Reading this book tired me too much to enumerate ALL the quietly terrible things, so a brief list will have to suffice:
- While the author is very... careful to use "Native American" instead of other terms, she decided to include a late 19th century story about an "Indian Princess" as truth- which EVEN THEN they admitted was false. If you read this book to your kids (please don't), take the time to explain the racism underlying Wendy Swore's depictions of "Native culture." There are plenty to go around.
-The plot is ostensibly about overcoming ableism- external in the forms of bullying and parental rejection and internal from absorbing those attitudes. If it was done well that would be a great book- I'll go further and say a NECESSARY book. This one isn't it. Toxic positivity, the most played out, bottom of the barrel storyline about bullies, and sneaky internalized ableism masquerading as caring solutions is what ya get.
-Hope you're good with American Imperialism being described as "I loved my country sooo much and tried to HELP those people but some kids blew me up for no reason. Maybe war is bad." This book is aimed at MIDDLE readers, Wendy. Good god.
-All religions and mythologies are fair game to Wendy, who is entitled to use closed practices if she wants to. Thankfully the text makes it very clear that THOSE are fake and made up, but Christianity is real.
In conclusion, this book is basically designed to make disabled, bullied and/or POC kids feel vaguely bad but not be able to articulate quite why. Flip side of the coin, it's a feel good story that reinforces traditionally white, Christian, conservative beliefs in things like "noble savage" tropes or the otherness of protective Black hairstyles, disproven 80s ideas about why people bully (and is definitely not how most bullying takes place in 2020- you can tell where it's autobiographical), and that the REAL disability is a bad attitude™.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

So powerful

Such a great story once the tears stop flowing and having to explain them to my children. As a manly father listening together with my kids, it seemed to bring us closer. I recomend the book especially for guys like us. So many teaching moments and the author brings out every emotion of all levels in the characters. Very well written as well narrated as well. Fair warning! The author does not give warning you won't be able to listen to it continuously. Be prepared to push pause many times for discussions.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Good book, well read, but…..

It’s way too long. I would have liked it better if it was an hour shorter. It really dragged on.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

amazing!!

i loved it!
And it was so not predictable!
I loved the narrator too

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

A stinker

My kids begged me to stop this one only half an hour in. Don't waste a credit here.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

I couldn't put it down. A story for everyone.

This book is something I wish years ago as a young child. As someone who was blessed with parents that taught the "Madeleine Volia my scar" philosophy, this is a story that tells that idea to a whole other level. There is so much packed in, its amazing that this story is as well written as it is and is utterly enchanting. Without giving anything away do yourself a favor and listen to Sofie's coming of age story.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

great for kids and adults

This is a great story and has hidden life lessons in it but I didnt like how they did certain sections as chapters when its not like that in the book.