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A Short History of Man  By  cover art

A Short History of Man

By: Hans-Hermann Hoppe
Narrated by: Millian Quinteros
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Publisher's Summary

A Short History of Man: Progress and Decline represents nothing less than a sweeping revisionist history of mankind, in a concise and listenable volume. Dr. Hans-Hermann Hoppe skillfully weaves history, sociology, ethics, and Misesian praxeology to present an alternative - and highly challenging - view of human economic development over the ages.

As always, Dr. Hoppe addresses the fundamental questions as only he can. How do family and social bonds develop? Why is the concept of private property so vitally important to human flourishing? What made the leap from a Malthusian subsistence society to an industrial society possible? How did we devolve from aristocracy to monarchy to social democratic welfare states? And how did modern central governments become the all-powerful rulers over nearly every aspect of our lives?

Dr. Hoppe examines and answers all of these often thorny questions without resorting to platitudes or bowdlerized history. This is Hoppe at his best: calmly and methodically skewering sacred cows.

©2015 Ludwig von Mises Institute (P)2016 Ludwig von Mises Institute

What listeners say about A Short History of Man

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    1 out of 5 stars

Narrative misread: I want my credit back.

Don't waste your MONEY. 1 star is too much, but it was required in order for me to review this book. I hadn't even settled in before the narrator, on the third page of the foreword, - 6th paragraph in fact - reverses the author's meaning by switching the word "unfortunately" to "fortunately". how can I go forward and trust the narrators fidelity?

5 people found this helpful

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Bad narration for a pretty good book

It's actually tough to tell how good this book may be when it's so difficult to listen to. The narrator's style would make Christopher Walken cringe. He seems to have gone to great lengths to eliminate all emotion from his reading. The sound quality is also fairly bad.

5 people found this helpful

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A good general overview

Consistent with other Austrian historical works , primarily Mises/Rothbard. Good starting read If familiar. with marginalism, basic Praxeology, time preference, and Austrian Business Cycle Theory.

2 people found this helpful

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Very good book

Hoppe always give very nice arguments.
Thee book is small but very precise. In other books, Hoppe explores in detail many things he mentioned in this book.

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Well worth the time

Incredible piece of work. Well worth the time to losten or read. I learned more in a few hours a semester of history.

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truly eye-opening

Unless one believes in conspiracy theories involving freemasons, world Jewry or reptilians, there is no better, more sane explanation for the current state of affairs in politics, state craft and economics.

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Brief and Concise

The title of this book reveals that it is not meant to be expansive. Nevertheless, Dr. Hoppe does ably cover the material found herein. We come away with the realization that mankind thinks he does well when he embraces democracy. Unfortunately when he does so, he has actually embraced yet another form of tyranny.

Millian Quinteros seems to be a bit hurried as he reads the text. But, I nevertheless appreciate the fact that he did read it!

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Hans Hoppe is my favorite intellectual

Hans Herman Hoppe is my favorite, and the greatest intellectual of our time. His application of the praxeological method to reconstruct human history is guaranteed to be more accurate than any human history class you've ever taken.

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Prehistoric Fairytale

Author's creation of prehistoric societies with no proof of ever having existed is very annoying.

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  • Emir
  • 10-13-20

enlightening

follow along on an amazing journey as we see how mankind became civilised through the introduction of private property norms and how it changed culture forever. a must listen

1 person found this helpful

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 03-17-22

fascinating essay on the causes of progress

My favorite part was the first half of the book where HHH talks about the early evolution of intelligence, family, and private property. That was fascinating.
Having read his masterpiece Democracy: The God that Failed, the second half of this essay was already familiar to me, though the reiteration of the arguments was still interesting to hear again.