• A Year Under Sharia Law

  • Memoir of an American Couple Living and Working in Saudi Arabia
  • By: Alex Fletcher, Liz Fletcher
  • Narrated by: Tyler Krzeszewski
  • Length: 3 hrs and 49 mins
  • 4.1 out of 5 stars (9 ratings)

1 title per month from Audible’s entire catalog of best sellers, and new releases.
Access a growing selection of included Audible Originals, audiobooks and podcasts.
You will get an email reminder before your trial ends.
Your Premium Plus plan is $14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $14.95

Buy for $14.95

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

Three years into a financial crisis that shows no sign of loosening its grip, a young couple make the unpopular decision to teach English in Saudi Arabia. The choice of Saudi Arabia is based primarily on the best salary offer and an all-expenses-paid round-trip flight. Secondarily, it is to satiate a desire to explore a country steeped in mystery and taboo. 

Little do they know that the experience will come with a price and change their lives in a profound way, witnessing human rights violations that go unchecked even up to today and an ultra-conservative culture wrestling with tradition and modernity. 

A Year Under Sharia Law is written as a travel memoir with vignettes of daily life and interactions with the community at large. It was also written to shine a spotlight on the plight of impoverished ladies who come to Saudi Arabia in the hopes of earning a salary to send money back to their family. They find work as nannies and house maids, primarily. These ladies are often stripped of their rights in a patriarchy that makes them prime targets for unspeakable abuses. Their passports are held by their Saudi employees, and they essentially become prisoners. 

This memoir is not only dedicated to them and their plight, but also the tireless and dangerous work done by journalists who are critical of Saudi Arabia’s human rights record. Some have paid the ultimate price.

©2019 Alex Fletcher (P)2020 Alex Fletcher

More from the same

What listeners say about A Year Under Sharia Law

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    4
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 3.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    3
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    1
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    4
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Take It For What It Is

I found this book mostly entertaining, though keep in mind that it's a memoir and not in any way an authoritative text on Saudi or it's human rights record. Certainly the authors had experiences worth sharing, and their work points to many fundamental differences between American and Saudi values. Their perspectives on life in Saudi are overwhelmingly negative (unsurprisingly) and I was left wanting something a bit more informative. It is useful to hear about firsthand experiences, though there were some mundane details. For example, I could have done without all the explanations of drama between English teachers. Overall it's a short read, and worth it if you want to hear a Westerner's view of daily life in Saudi.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Maureen Masters
  • Maureen Masters
  • 05-11-20

A year under sharia law

An interesting work.
Narration too fast too American
A rip off so short for the price.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Sonya
  • Sonya
  • 04-22-20

Gripping!

I was really drawn into this story, having always been curious about expat life in Saudi but knowing I would never try it. The memoir is informative and gripping; I learned lots of details about how the country works: its quirks and, sadly, its atrocities.
I felt it ended abruptly! I'd have liked a little info on their journey back and feelings on reintegarating to life in the US, just some deeper reflection at the end. If that was a sequel, I'd read it!
The narrator was enthusiastic and clear but I would remove half a star (if I could) for some odd language slips in the text that could have been caught by a good copy editor e.g. 'would have went'.

1 person found this helpful

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 02-28-21

Disappointing insight

I had hoped that this book would give a real insight into what it was like for people living and working in a country with such different laws and lives to the ones we are used to. Unfortunately it was a bit of a rant and whinge that they were being paid well for not a lot of work.
Most of their problems were self inflicted. Surely if you go to a country that has such strict laws surrounding the consumption of alcohol and modesty by women, you would think you would be able to abstain from drinking and partying in bikinis while you were in that country.
Also, the major “escape” from the party near the end was a bit hard to swallow.
Overall the story gave only a glimpse of life in this country where human rights is non existent and lives matter little to the regime. Instead we were told about over charging cab drivers, a wide variety of restaurants visited and the occasional acid reflux issue.

.