• After Steve

  • How Apple Became a Trillion-Dollar Company and Lost its Soul
  • By: Tripp Mickle
  • Narrated by: Will Damron
  • Length: 14 hrs and 42 mins
  • 4.6 out of 5 stars (316 ratings)

1 title per month from Audible’s entire catalog of best sellers, and new releases.
Access a growing selection of included Audible Originals, audiobooks and podcasts.
You will get an email reminder before your trial ends.
Your Premium Plus plan is $14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $34.22

Buy for $34.22

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

From the Wall Street Journal’s Tripp Mickle, the dramatic, untold story inside Apple after the passing of Steve Jobs by following his top lieutenants—Jony Ive, the Chief Design Officer, and Tim Cook, the COO-turned-CEO—and how the fading of the former and the rise of the latter led to Apple losing its soul.

Steve Jobs called Jony Ive his “spiritual partner at Apple.” The London-born genius was the second-most powerful person at Apple and the creative force who most embodies Jobs’s spirit, the man who designed the products adopted by hundreds of millions the world over: the iPod, iPad, MacBook Air, the iMac G3, and the iPhone. In the wake of his close collaborator’s death, the chief designer wrestled with grief and initially threw himself into his work designing the new Apple headquarters and the Watch before losing his motivation in a company increasingly devoted more to margins than to inspiration.

In many ways, Cook was Ive’s opposite. The product of a small Alabama town, he had risen through the ranks from the supply side of the company. His gift was not the creation of new products. Instead, he had invented countless ways to maximize a margin, squeezing some suppliers, persuading others to build factories the size of cities to churn out more units. He considered inventory evil. He knew how to make subordinates sweat with withering questions.

Jobs selected Cook as his successor, and Cook oversaw a period of tremendous revenue growth that has lifted Apple’s valuation to $2 trillion. He built a commanding business in China and rapidly distinguished himself as a master politician who could forge global alliances and send the world’s stock market into freefall with a single sentence.

Author Tripp Mickle spoke with more than 200 current and former Apple executives, as well as figures key to this period of Apple’s history, including Trump administration officials and fashion luminaries such as Anna Wintour while writing After Steve. His research shows the company’s success came at a cost. Apple lost its innovative spirit and has not designed a new category of device in years. Ive’s departure in 2019 marked a culmination in Apple’s shift from a company of innovation to one of operational excellence, and the price is a company that has lost its soul.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2022 Tripp Mickle (P)2022 HarperCollins Publishers

What listeners say about After Steve

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    220
  • 4 Stars
    73
  • 3 Stars
    20
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    1
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    224
  • 4 Stars
    55
  • 3 Stars
    10
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    204
  • 4 Stars
    66
  • 3 Stars
    13
  • 2 Stars
    4
  • 1 Stars
    2

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Disappointing & full of faked fiction

This brings absolutely no new information to the story of Apple. It is a shallow amalgam of publicly known and well publicised Apple facts.
With a lot of annoying freestyle parts that are clearly pure fabrication and stick out as a poor attempt at screenwriting.

The title is misleading.

Many passages dealing with inner feelings and private moments are unbelievable and fabricated fiction and not based on any sources however written in a matter of fact style which at some point completely destroys trust in authors credibility.

This is neither a properly researched corporate biography nor analytical essay with thesis and analysis expected by a misleading title.

Will ask for a refund.

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

So I hear Tim Cook didn’t drop by the design department enough

This was an interesting story about the Apple corporation’s very recent history. The one thing I swear must have been repeated ten times was that Tim Cook didn’t drop by the design department to critique designs as often as the late Steve Jobs. It sounds like Jony Ive probably wouldn’t have hated Tim Cook dropping by the design dept. Cook is a very different leader than Jobs, but it sounds as if Cook has navigated some very difficult times effectively (like dealing with the trump craziness) with a level of diplomacy that the late Jobs would have never been able to pull off without losing his cool. I would have loved to have learned even more about Jony Ive, perhaps in another biography.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Worth a Listen

Interesting story, thoroughly reported- most salient point for me - the grandiose nature of Silicon Valley, the belief that your consumer product is “changing the world” when it is really just a way to have a successful company. Similarly - you must marvel at the superficiality of the design group, and their obsession with small details that are unimportant in the world, except maybe for the aesthetics of their private jets.

But the reporting and corporate information is solid and interesting. The narrator disappoints - very professional but sounds robotic, does not add to the production.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Fantastic

Highly recommend for anyone who’s grown up from the days of Apple ][‘s two Steve’s with great insight to the Cook years.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Wonderful Insight!

Being a tenured employee in a retail store it was wonderful to listen to the stories and full transparency. Great writing and kudos to the narrator!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Amazing buck five stars all the way.

The book tells you where the name of the company came from he describes how Apple fell apart or the key people fell apart after Steve left or died I mean, just a very detailed book highly recommend if you’re an Apple fanatic

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Just What Many of Us Thought Happened at Apple

This book was an excellent book. The performance was equally as good. The book confirmed what many of us have known for some time and brought out a great deal more detail that I, at least, did not know. I listened to the entire book in just a very few days, which is unusual for me because of my schedule, with the exception of 1/2 of chapter 16, which I could care less about. I've been an Apple "Fan Boy" since the Apple II. I learned more about the main characters, which helped me understand why certain things have happened at Apple. Talent doesn't always win out at Apple when it comes to hiring. The book had a good pace and covered the main points very well. I think the title of the book says it all. I found it interesting that very little was said about the Macintosh computer and only from a style point of view. I guess it has never met Tim's success criteria and explains why Apple just let the Mac go for so long till they had to do something. The book explains in a concise way why services are now number one and products are a sad second in many ways. The real strength of Apple is the operating systems and that really wasn't covered at all. I found the whole thing of the car to be enlightening and a big waste of money for a CEO so concerned with money. And the author raised real questions as to whether it will ever see the light of day. I could not agree more. I really appreciated the author's frankness about telling us how hard it is to write a book like this on Apple and why. This was a great read. My stock has done well but my heart in many ways has been broken.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Excellent piece

After hearing the entire book; I could say that what impress me more was when Trump became president and the things that Cook do to prevail!
Enjoy the book!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Incredibly interesting look at how Apple lost its soul

One of best books post Steve I’ve read on Apple. Apple is no longer an innovator, no longer a revolutionary. Apple today imitates Microsoft’s path under Gates and Balmer of evolutionary of a one hit cow that they keep milking. Nadella has changed the culture at Microsoft for good where Tim Cook has killed Apples soul that set it apart under Steve’s leadership.

I’ve worked selling Apple technologies and solutions since 1987 and have owned almost every one of their products. Tim Cook is the latest John Scully.

The book is well narrated and supported and the story telling is captivating. Well done

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Very interesting, but redundant writing style and some facts just WRONG

Overall, this book was very good and seemed to represent a lot of hard work, extensive interviews, and interesting stories. But, I had a few problems with it. First, some “facts” were simply incorrect. For example, the author said, several times, that Jobs’ father was Iranian. All other sources, including the Isaacson book, other Jobs biographies, magazine articles, interviews, podcasts, and even Wikipedia, say that Jobs’ father was SYRIAN. Where did the author get this “fact” about his Iranian heritage? So then, if such a well known fact was so blatantly incorrect, then how many other “facts” are incorrect? Did the author really even do the research he claims to have done? Next point…why is there so much redundancy in this book?!? At first, it starts out, chapter by chapter, alternating between Jonny Ive and Tim Cook, and the story is presented chronologically. But then in the 2010s, the story gets a little more mixed up and starts to blend both of their stories together, often repeating some points (for dramatic effect??) throughout. Finally, the narrator, while he has an excellent speaking voice, seems to try a little too hard at times to convey emotion in the reading. I almost felt like he was crying during some sadder parts of the story, but that can’t be right, can it?

Anyway, as an Apple and Steve Jobs fanboy, i believe this should be added to everyone’s must-read list of books, and I can’t wait to hear discussions about it on my favorite Apple podcasts (I’m talking to you, Mac Power Users!). But I would certainly like to hear some comments from people “in the know” about how factual this book was and whether or not people agree that with the loss of Jobs and I’ve, Apple has lost its soul. I know Cook and other bean counters don’t have the creative soul to carry the company forward indefinitely, but I have to believe among the thousands working in that spaceship building, there are more than a few very creative individuals who can push this great company to innovate again in the future.