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Publisher's Summary

I'm Aboriginal. I'm just not the Aboriginal person a lot of people want or expect me to be.

What does it mean to be Aboriginal? Why is Australia so obsessed with notions of identity? Anita Heiss, successful author and passionate campaigner for Aboriginal literacy, was born a member of the Wiradjuri nation of Central New South Wales but was raised in the suburbs of Sydney and educated at the local Catholic school. 

Anita, amongst other proud Aboriginal Australians, was publicly called out as too 'fair-skinned' to be an Australian Aboriginal. Such accusations led to Anita's involvement in one of the most important and sensational Australian legal decisions of the 21st-century when she joined others in charging a newspaper columnist with breaching the Racial Discrimination Act. He was found guilty.

In this deeply personal memoir, told in her distinctive, wry style, Anita Heiss gives a first-hand account of her experiences as a woman with an Aboriginal mother and Austrian father, and explains the development of her activist consciousness. 

Listen to her story and ask: what does it take for someone to be Black enough for you?

©2022 Dr Anita Heiss (P)2022 Penguin Random House Australia

What listeners say about Am I Black Enough for You?

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  • Anonymous User
  • 05-02-22

An important book for ALL Australians

I have recommended this book to everyone within my workplace. As an Aboriginal Australian of mixed heritage, so many things within this book resonated with me. I have given my hard copy to my mother to read, someone who also grew up as a First Nations woman in Sydney NSW during the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s. Many truths experienced by so many, not just Anita. Thank you for sharing your story with us Dr Anita Heiss.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 04-12-22

Inspiring, funny, informative.

Thank you so much for this. I'm sharing this book and the important messages I received whilst reading it.

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  • Jo O'Mara
  • 04-10-22

Brilliant text by brilliant writer!

Everything Anita Heiss writes is fantastic, and "Am I Black Enough for You?: 10Years On" is no exception.

Heiss is a generous spirited, insightful and open-minded writer. She is a proud advocate of First Nations people, and particularly the masterful fiction writing being produced by First Nations writers in Australia today. Her own writing is such a pleasure to read.

As an audible book, this reading of her autobiographical reflection by herself works very well, as it is great to hear her read it in such a communicative and heart-felt way.

I highly recommend this book to all Australians. Heiss circumnavigates a myriad of experiences she has had of acceptance, racism, joy, hardship, survival and flourishing, and unpicks them all with insight and understanding. I read this book when it first came out, and have really enjoyed and learnt a lot from listening to this reworking of the text.

I'm a secondary English teacher by trade, and think this would make an outstanding book for study at school in senior English classes. In Chapter 24, "20 Reasons you should read Blak", Heiss makes 20 compelling, different arguments for "Reading Blak". I need no convincing however, as, for me, the quality of Blak writing in Australia is enough. First Nations literature should be taught at every year of schooling in Australia. There would be so much gained, and nothing lost, through doing this.

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