1 title per month from Audible’s entire catalog of best sellers, and new releases.
Access a growing selection of included Audible Originals, audiobooks and podcasts.
You will get an email reminder before your trial ends.
Your Premium Plus plan is $14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $31.18

Buy for $31.18

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

The digital version of this audiobook contains an introduction read by Carl Bernstein.

The Pulitzer Prize-winning coauthor of All the President’s Men - the chronicle of the investigative report about the Watergate break-in and resultant political scandal that led to President Richard Nixon’s resignation - recalls his formative years as a teenage newspaper reporter in JFK’s Washington - a tale of adventures, scrapes, clever escapes, and the opportunity of a lifetime.

“Carl Bernstein, Washington Star.”

With these words, the 16-year-old senior at Montgomery Blair High School set himself apart from the high school crowd and set himself on a track that would define his life. Carl Bernstein was far from the best student in his class - in fact, he was in danger of not graduating at all - but he had a talent for writing, a burning desire to know things that other people didn’t, and a flair for being in the right place at the right time. Those qualities got him inside the newsroom at the Washington Star, the afternoon paper in the nation’s capital, in the summer of 1960, a pivotal time for America, for Washington, DC, and for a young man in a hurry on the cusp of adulthood.

Chasing History opens up the world of the early 1960s as Bernstein experienced it, chasing after grisly crimes with the paper’s police reporter, gathering colorful details at a John F. Kennedy campaign rally, running afoul of union rules, and confronting racial tensions as the civil rights movement gained strength. We learn alongside him as he comes to understand the life of a newspaperman, and we share his pride as he hunts down information, gets his first byline, and discovers that he has a talent for the job after all.

By turns exhilarating, funny, tense, and poignant, Chasing History shows us a country coming into its own maturity along with young Carl Bernstein, and when he strikes out on his own after five years at the Star, his hard-won knowledge and experience feels like ours as well.

A Macmillan Audio production from Henry Holt and Company

"Narrator Robert Petkoff, with an occasional assist from the author, takes listeners back to the beginning. Sounding like an indulgent grandfather telling his life story to his grandchildren, Petkoff recounts how a scrappy high schooler managed to worm his way into the Washington Star newsroom at age 16.... This audiobook will provide hope to any would-be journalist." (AudioFile)

©2022 by Essential Reporting Enterprises, Inc. (P)2021 Macmillan Audio

What listeners say about Chasing History

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    186
  • 4 Stars
    32
  • 3 Stars
    7
  • 2 Stars
    4
  • 1 Stars
    1
Performance
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    161
  • 4 Stars
    31
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    1
Story
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    162
  • 4 Stars
    25
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    3
  • 1 Stars
    1

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Wonderfully Entertaining

A thoroughly enjoyable book. Read on daily walks. Often dreaded walk until I remembered I would be listening to Chasing History and hurried to get started.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Fascinating memories of experiences long gone.

Carl does a wonderful job of bringing to life his experiences as a copy boy. Having been one myself in that era it brought back vivid personal memories of linotype machines and the splendid stress of daily deadlines that I haven't given thought to in decades. Thank you Carl.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Revisiting my own life

A great book about newspaper journalism in the era between ‘The Front Page” and today’s electronic productions. My own early career for 13 years also was dedicated to the “calling” of Journalism — substitute the Cleveland Press for the Star — and every word of Bernstein’s memoir rings true.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

I really wanted to like it but…

Here’s a book in desperate need of an editor. Stories that start but never finish, lots of names and descriptions of girlfriends of the author’s friends, narratives involving people the readers are not even remotely interested in learning about. A man who lived through some of our nation’s more intriguing and complex affairs decides to write about meaningless, highly personal pursuits. Even listening at 1.2 speed and skipping some chapters what a monumental waste of time this book was.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Well written, as expected

Having grown up in the same area, at a later time, I thoroughly enjoyed the memories. Many of the stories discussed and covered in this book are expanded, behind the scenes looks at the events and times I vividly remember. I was slightly disappointed at the timing of the ending, pre Watergate. I can hope that Mr Bernstein has a follow up book with his personal perspective on his time at the Post. A great listen,well narrated and very informative.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

CB brought back to life the old DC

Carl Bernstein was able to draw a vivid picture of DC’s journalism and DC the sedate city before it became all consumed with power, both political and celebrity culture. Bernstein’s heartfelt and lifelong sentiments for the Washington Star surprised me since I had been under the impression that Washington had long lost him to the megawatts bright lights of New York City’s media and literati world. As the case with his attachment to the Washington Star, I found his description of Washington, the city, truly genuine and touching. I appreciate that Bernstein had written this book, it gave us an appreciation of not only his talents, his doggedness, his “innocence” but also of the friends, editors and mentors who had generously given Carl an excellent education. I hope there are still people like these in today’s newsrooms who can teach and groom the next generation of Carl Bernstein.

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Self absorbed

His story is not as interesting as the stories he wrote. What an uninspiring, self absorbed man. The book of his ex-wife on the other hand is a lot more entertaining and better written. I recommend hers.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

A really great memoir!

I thought Mr Bernstein’s account of life in a mid-century newsroom was outstanding. And if ever someone was born to be a newspaper man, it was he.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Carl Bernstein's tale of his early years in the news business

This audiobook has more detail about the author's career than I cared to hear, and yet his enthusiasm for every aspect of how a newspaper works is infectious, and also fascinating. Also worth hearing are Bernstein's accounts of important people and events during the 1960s.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

History through a journalist’s eyes

Great account of a heralded journalist’s rise in the golden age of newspapers. Bernstein writes colorfully about his colleagues and made them come to life with their personal idiosyncrasies. What comes through is his reverence for his profession and his respect for his early mentors….I found it fascinating