• CivCEO 6

  • The Accidental Champion, Book 6
  • By: Andrew Karevik
  • Narrated by: Neil Hellegers
  • Length: 7 hrs and 50 mins
  • 4.8 out of 5 stars (136 ratings)

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CivCEO 6  By  cover art

CivCEO 6

By: Andrew Karevik
Narrated by: Neil Hellegers
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Publisher's Summary

Since that free-for-all that saw every Champion hurry to claim as much land as they could, many of the weaker rulers have been eliminated. As a result, the whole land of Liora is now under the control of eight single coalitions. Can they be trusted to keep to themselves and play nice, or should they be treated like threats and dealt with accordingly?

That is one of the main questions Charles and his allies intend to answer when they meet up to finalize their own union. But they've barely started on the main discussion points when an emissary from the north appears to give them an ultimatum: Join their alliance or suffer the consequences.

With Tine facing imminent capture, Charles has no choice but to step up his military. Though he already managed to secure the Great Primus Heart that would power the vehicle, Charles still needs to acquire enough Prephius steel to make the train near indestructible.

Follow Charles as he visits an underwater necropolis and ends up having to bargain with the dead. Follow him as he makes new enemies and has to find how to keep his new marriage alive, all the while trying to raise not a city, but an entire union with its own perks, stats, and special units.

©2020 LitRPG Freaks (P)2021 Tantor

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    4 out of 5 stars
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Andrew Karevik Doesn't Understand Economics

At the national level, at least as far as inflation works. This book is very frustrating in as far as it's based on a completely backwards understanding of fiat currency and inflationary banking. The mechanics driving the story as so mind-bogglingly wrong I'm a little worried for Mr. Karevik.

The ludicrous circumstance that sets the stage for this mess is a ridiculously high influx of gold into the world economy. Where this gold is coming from is never really established, but it is an unlimited resource for the purpose of this book. Mr. Karevik correctly describes what happens when there is a rapidly expanding money supply. At one point in the book he actually defines inflation, but it's not an actual definition so much as a description of what happens because of inflation: he states that the price of goods outpace the supply due to the abundance of currency. This does not actually define inflation completely. Inflation, in fact, refers to the increase in amount of money present in an economic system, the rise in price is a consequence of this increased money supply, it has no correlation with supply and demand of the goods that the money is used to purchase. This conflation of what inflation is is so common that from a literary perspective he does define inflation correctly (it's what the dictionary says), but economics doesn't care what the literary world thinks.

The bizarre solution to the inflation caused by this infinite supply of gold is Charles introduces a fiat currency built on the inflationary model of central banking that the United States (and the rest of the world for that matter) uses with the Federal Reserve. To state it explicitly, he introduces an inflationary monetary system to control inflation.

Of course why Mr. Karevik chose to do this is beyond me. The inflationary monetary system is predatory and invariably fails. It is a de facto tax on everyone but hits the poorest people in any economic system the hardest. It is inherently unstable and the truly confusing part is Mr. Karevik accurately describes the fundamental, and fatal, flaw in any fiat currency.

To sum it up, the story in this book (#6) is based on a fantastical circumstance of a very rare substance suddenly becoming infinite to create an economic problem that Charles solves by institutionalizing the problem in the form of fiat currency and a central bank.

This is a mind-bendingly stupid plot in an otherwise excellent and well crafted story. I will definitely continue listening to this series, but geez-o-petes this one failed spectacularly on the economic mechanics and was actually hard to get through as a result.

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    4 out of 5 stars

Disliked economic plan

Spoilers ahead!
I like that things turned out ok.
However, I really hated his economic plan.
Enough so that I stopped reading for awhile.
In the real world giving huge amounts of gold to your enemy would drive up inflation, however they would then be able to afford it. Surrounding nations would have the same inflation without the funding and they would fall to him. Arum paper money is pegged to gold so you would also have inflation. Spreading word of big payouts to threats would encourage kidnapping. Not telling your wife and partners the plan upfront could be catastrophic. She could be upset at inadvertently hurting peasants and causing hunger. Allies might lose respect after learning you gave away so much gold to their enemy. The plan can derail if they won’t agree to declaring war at the key moment.
I was relieved once he finally told wife and allies what he was doing.

Proverbs 15:22 There is a frustrating of plans where there is no confidential talk, but in the multitude of counselors there is accomplishment.

1 person found this helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars

short and not exciting

Not a very good story, nothing really happened but plotting and scheming. Feels like a build up to the next book.