• Collective Illusions

  • Conformity, Complicity, and the Science of Why We Make Bad Decisions
  • By: Todd Rose
  • Narrated by: Jay Ben Markson
  • Length: 7 hrs and 25 mins
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars (69 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Drawing on cutting-edge neuroscience, behavioral economic, and social psychology research, acclaimed author, former Harvard professor, and think tank founder Todd Rose reveals how so much of our thinking about each other is informed by false assumptions that drive bad decisions that make us dangerously mistrustful as a society and hopelessly unhappy as individuals.

The desire to fit in is one of the most powerful, least understood forces in a society.

Todd Rose believes that as human beings we continually act against our own best interests out of our brains’ misunderstanding of what we think others believe.  A complicated set of illusions driven by conformity bias distorts how we see the world around us. From toilet paper shortages to kidneys that get thrown away rather than used for desperately needed organ transplants, from racial segregation to the perceived “electability” of women for political office, from bottled water to “cancel culture,” we routinely copy others, lie about what we believe, cling to tribes, and silence others.

We are so profoundly social that when we are incongruent with the group that we do lasting damage to our self-worth, diminish our well-being and never realize our full potential. It’s why we all too often chase the familiar trappings of money, fame, and success that leave us feeling empty even when we do achieve them. It’s why we’ll blindly espouse a viewpoint we don’t necessarily believe in so that we blend in with the group. We trap ourselves in prisons of our own making that prevent us from living the happy, fulfilled lives we envision.

The question is, Why do we keep believing the lies and hurting ourselves?

Todd Rose reveals the answer is deeply hard-wired in our DNA, with brains that are more socially dependent than we realize or dare to accept. Most of us would rather be fully in sync with the social norms of our respective groups than true to who we are. 

Using originally researched data, Collective Illusions shows us where we get things wrong and just as important, how we can be authentic in forming our opinions while valuing truth. Rose offers a counterintuitive, empowering, and hopeful explanation for how we can bridge the inference gap, make decisions with a newfound clarity, and achieve fulfillment. Only then can we transform ourselves, and ultimately, society.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.  

©2022 Todd Rose (P)2022 Hachette Go

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Psychology 101

A basic review of psychology and peer pressure from the woke perspective. I learned all of this in the eighth grade.

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starts well but later deviates from the subject

the first part is about collective illusions and is good and interesting. Towards the later parts it changes to the writers personal views on unjustices in the world. Without good references on what is the writers views and what is views founded or collectively believed. Thus becoming a bad example of spreading collective illusions.