• CompTIA Network+

  • A Pratical Guide for Beginners to Learn About the CompTIA Network + Certification + Pratical Exercises
  • By: Mike Brown
  • Narrated by: Jack R James
  • Length: 5 hrs and 19 mins
  • 2.4 out of 5 stars (9 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

You are moments away from learning the ins and outs of CompTIA Network+ to help you start and advance a career in IT infrastructure!

Certifications are everything in IT. They can make the difference between you being selected for an open job position and being turned down. What better way to truly get ahead of the competition than being certified by the world leader in vendor-neutral IT certification exams, CompTIA. 

With hundreds of companies like IBM, Dell, Canon, Unisys, the US Department of Defense, Toshiba, Apple, and many others insisting on CompTIA qualifications before hiring, it makes perfect sense to make it a priority to enroll for a CompTIA certification exam. 

More precisely, if you wish to pursue a career in IT infrastructure (configuring, managing, and troubleshooting networks), then enrolling for CompTIA Network+ certification should be top on your priority list if you want to get ahead on such topics like TCP/IP, topologies, troubleshooting, subnetting, and more. A CompTIA Network+ certification will not only come in handy during an interview, it will also be very important whenever there is a network emergency, as you will know how to: 

  • Troubleshoot any network problems
  • Configure, manage as well as maintain essential network devices
  • Design as well as implement functional networks
  • Help in the creation of virtualized networks
  • Identify the drawbacks and benefits of different existing network configurations
  • Use devices like switches along with routers for segmenting network traffic and creating resilient networks
  • Etc.

Indeed, CompTIA Network+ certification can make you a darling for any employer that’s keen on ensuring efficient functioning of all networks. 

And this book will introduce you to CompTIA Network+ to help you prepare well for the certification exam and for real world application of everything covered in the certification.

In this book, you will learn:

  • The basics of networks, including what networks are, the different types of networks and their components, network infrastructure as well as the different network topologies
  • How to choose the right topology for your network
  • The backbone of a network, including different network segments
  • Open Systems Interconnection Specifications
  • The different internetworking models and layers
  • The ins and outs of networking devices, including setting them up (configuring), troubleshooting and more
  • The ins and outs of TCP/IP
  • The ins and outs of IP addressing, including the different IP terminology, the hierarchical IP addressing scheme, the different types of IPv4 addresses, private IP addresses, migrating to IPv6 and more
  • How to troubleshoot IP addressing
  • How to create subnets
  • The ins and outs of IP subletting and much more
  • Everything there is to know about network virtualization
  • Wireless networking and security
  • Network threats and vulnerabilities
  • The different types of cables and troubleshooting any arising problems
  • And much more!

The CompTIA Security+ certification is indeed your ticket to becoming a better IT infrastructure professional and will not only help you land the job but also help you to execute it well. 

Lucky for you, this book uses simple, easy-to-follow language to break down the otherwise complex topic into easy to digest points that you can start applying immediately.

Click buy now to get started!

©2019 Mike Brown (P)2019 Mike Brown

What listeners say about CompTIA Network+

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Misses the mark

This audio book would look and seem to be exactly what someone pursuing a Network+ certification would want. It misses the mark, however, because it conveys the information in a hard-to-understand manner. Created, most likely, for people in the UK, there are many sections that I finish with a continued scratching of the head. If someone is trying to enter a new environment of technology and networking concepts, they should not also have to hurdle the barrier of difficult to understand content.

Example: The OSI model, which is comprised of different layers, should be named and numbers 1-7, or spoken One through Seven. This book, and its narration, calls every Layer Two device a "Layer a Pair" device, but then calls all other numbers by their actual number. This is both asinine and ridiculous. Another example the use of acronyms. When acronyms, such as HTML, SSL, or DNS are used, we would expect that the following description of them use the words for the letters they represent: Hypertext Markup Language, Secure Socket Layer, and Domain Name Service. This audio book, however, sometimes uses other words that don't even coincide with the appropriate letter, further confusing the listener.

I would stay away from this audio book, especially if you are someone who is trying to Pass the Network+ exam

6 people found this helpful

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terrible translation

The translation is almost comical. The content is great, but more thought should been put into translating the text to English.

2 people found this helpful

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Good information but poorly written

This book was obviously not written by someone who speaks English very well. That in itself is not a bad thing but it should have been edited by a native speaker. It is very difficult to understand. The information is fine but it is not good writing.

2 people found this helpful

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Jumbled words

The narrator occasionally gets his words jumbled so badly you have no idea what he's saying. It's extremely distracting when trying to learn content. When his words are not jumbled, the Narrator speaks good English, but, it's clear he does not speak American English. This would be perfectly fine if it was a story but it just does not work in a technical learning setting. He will occasionally use non American terms for things and descriptions. Unfortunately he also does this for technical terms which makes it difficult to study for the American version of the test. He would also use technical terms before defining and talking about them and just assume you are ok being left in the dark for 3 chapter on what that word means. I can't get behind this teaching style because it causes my brain to constantly get distracted. For all of these reasons I was forced to give up and delete this one.

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Wot the bloody 'ell wos 'e sayin?

I'll preface this with some background: I'm an American IT professional who wanted to have a basic networking audio book to listen to while doing house work that would refresh me on basic networking concepts. When I selected this book, I had no idea it was narrated by a Brit. Initially, I was delighted; I love me some British television. Besides, I reasoned, IT terminology can't be that different internationally, particularly between to English-speaking countries. It took this narrator maybe 20 minutes to completely convince me that UK English is utter nonsense. Raincoat addresses. Layer a-pair-of. The crystal rectifier will sunshine state ickier. At times, I was worried I had bought a book written by a commemt-algorithm-bot. I'm tempted to by a hard copy of the book just to see if the author wrote the jibberish I was hearing, or if it was written in plain speech and this guy was just saying what his brain interpreted. The most confusing part: for the most part, I UNDERSTOOD WHAT HE MEANT. I had to puzzle some stuff out, like a raincoat being a MAC, but largely because I had a solid foundation in IT already.

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narration subpar

like so many audiobooks in the tech world...being able to read the material accurately and have the correct words said and the correct punctuation followed makes a world of difference when listening to subjects like this.
the narrator failed to consistently deliver this chapter over chapter making listening a chore.

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Very basic but INCORRECT, long-winded information

A high percentage of tech audiobooks seem to be either lazily written, or flat-out scams. This falls in the lazily written and lazily produced category. To the extent that the author even screws up the names of the 7 OSI Networking layers. Perhaps in the UK the "data link" layer (Layer 2) is in fact called the "Electrical" layer, but a quick google search yields exactly zero pages confirming this in the first page of results. Furthermore, the author manages to take about an hour to deliver 10 minutes of information at a time. There are errors throughout the first hour that I stuck out. Some are careless errors for which there is no excuse. When going over a list of Pros and Cons the narrator points out a list of "Professionals and Cons". Seriously? Are you even thinking about the sounds coming out of your mouth? Ever hear of an editor?

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Not for American's

Listened for 30 minutes understood almost nothing, and I have been in I.T. for years, first taking Network+ now. This book was written for people in the U.K. I think the narrator called an IP address an internet proper address. Some serious accent the narrator has, plus many words Americans don't use or relate to. Hard enough learning the material on its own, throw in this "language barrier", and..lol good luck! If you don't speak the Queen's English, this book is not for you. I'm returning immediately!

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  • ReviewZone
  • 10-29-20

Good book

extremely useful book for understanding networks and building one. A bit overwhelming though, so much information

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  • James
  • 08-14-20

Its utter jibberish

This has not been translated properly it would seem! Utterly useless, its just random words.