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Publisher's Summary

Joseph is having a comically rough year. His job sucks, his relationship ended, he’s plagued by prank phone calls, and he nearly lost his father to the virus. When his best friend asks him to donate his sperm so that she can start a family, Joseph just can’t understand why anyone would bring a child into this calamitous world. The only bright spot is an intriguing new online relationship with an attractive internet “daddy” that has him rethinking his isolation until a series of revelations have him facing even bigger decisions about his future.

Portions of this audiobook contain mature language. Listener discretion is advised.

Playwright Paul Kruse was awarded a commission through the Audible Emerging Playwrights Fund, an initiative dedicated to developing innovative original plays driven by language and voice. As an Audible-commissioned playwright, he received funding and creative support to develop Daddies.

Directed by Adil Mansoor. 

©2022 Paul Kruse (P)2022 AO Media LLC

About the Creator

Paul William Kruse is a playwright, film/video maker, and teaching artist from western Wisconsin. His work flows from his queer identity, Catholic roots, and ever-evolving experience of family. He is a founding member and resident playwright of Hatch Arts Collective in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Paul often writes collaboratively, drawing from his years of experience as a videographer and documentarian. Paul recently completed his MFA at UT Austin where he was a fellow with the Michener Center for Writers.

About the Director

Adil Mansoor is a theatre director centering the stories of queer folks and people of color. His current project "Amm(i)gone" adapts Sophocles’s "Antigone" as an apology to and from his mother. "Amm(i)gone" is a National Performance Network (NPN) Creative and Development Fund Project co-commissioned by Kelly Strayhorn Theater, The Theater Offensive, and NPN. Mansoor has developed work with New York Theatre Workshop, The Poetry Project, Bronx Academy of Arts and Dance, Tofte Lake Center, NYU Tisch, and PearlArts Studios. Directing projects include Chickens in the Yard by Paul Kruse (Hatch and Quantum), Gloria by Branden Jacobs-Jenkins (Hatch), Desdemona’s Child by Caridad Svich (Carnegie Mellon), and Plano by Will Arbery (Quantum). Mansoor is a founding member of Pittsburgh’s Hatch Arts Collective and the former Artistic Director of Dreams of Hope, an LGBTQA+ youth arts organization. He has been a NYTW 2050 Fellow, a Gerri Kay New Voices Fellow with Quantum Theater, and is currently an Art of Practice Fellow and Community Leader with Sundance. He is part of the inaugural Artist Caucus gathered by Baltimore Center Stage, Long Wharf, St. Louis Rep, and Woolly Mammoth. Mansoor received his MFA Directing from Carnegie Mellon.

Featuring

Featured Article: Introducing Audible Theater's Spring Lineup


We were thrilled when the Minetta Lane Theater, Audible's home for live storytelling, reopened its doors this past October, after being shuttered since the start of the pandemic. But even if you can't make your way to New York City to experience some of these performances in person, Audible Theater is serving up a spring lineup of six amazing new shows. Explore all of these below, as well as everything Audible Theater has to offer.

What listeners say about Daddies

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So relatable!

I loved listening to this original play and was amazed by how invested I became in the main character and his experiences during a long pandemic quarantine. I loved the storytelling and use of various pandemic digital realities to layer the narrative. The characters and their impressions of these very complex situations were so relatable. I loved the twist in the end— it made me want to go back and listen again!

6 people found this helpful

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Problematic

One of the difficulties in writing is making a main character that is believable and likeable. Character flaws are key to making the audience empathize with a character and it leaves room for growth. Unfortunately, the main character has a toxic self-righteousness that can be found in the gay community these days. People who are well educated but overall, not very intelligent. They lack basic human kindness in favor of superiority and being morally right in grey or complex issues. One star for overall because i didn't enjoy the short narrative overall. One star for performance as very little range was used by main character. One star for story because the plot made little sense and there were holes in the narrative and logic. This could have been wrapped up nicely with the main character awakening from an ICU coma because it had the logic of a fever dream.

5 people found this helpful

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Not what I was expecting.

I really didn’t know what to expect because I didn’t read the description.. skimmed it barely. But the story was interesting. I wish we could’ve known a little more - felt like the author decided to keep us in suspense. It was an good look into how we aren’t always the “best friend” we think we are. Sometimes we focus more on ourselves than those around us. Makes us seem self-centered. Even during a pandemic, we should take our friends and families feelings into consideration, and be aware of how we treat them.

4 people found this helpful

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not the ending I expected


good story but could use a part 2 great actors just seemed unfinished

4 people found this helpful

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Excellent

Surprising and beautifully written with great performances from the actors. It is a play that is both current and timeless.

3 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars

Hilarious/relatable pandemic about relationships

The thing I love about how Paul Kruse writes relationships is you can find at least one relatable character trait, if not more. This play pulls us through the beginning of the pandemic, including all the funny and ugly truths of the world we live in today. The story is one of those stories where after you know the ending, you just have to go back and listen again to see what you missed the first time around.



3 people found this helpful

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Funny, tender, nuanced. Queer brilliance!

This play is for all those queer folks out there who know how it is to feel held in so many beautiful and complicated ways by families of their choosing. Held as in held accountable. And held as in lovingly embraced even at far flung distances amidst a pandemic. It's a play, too, about online dating, suffering through Zoom teaching (ha!), desire, longing, change, time, examining privilege, intergenerational compassion, friendship, conflict and care. If all this sounds like your cup of tea, get ready to laugh and feel things. Paul Kruse is a brilliant and exquisite writer, who gorgeously disrupts our expectations. And Adil Mansoor is a directing magician.

3 people found this helpful

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clever awesome performance

excellent production you feel like you are there the whole time. The voice performerces are wonderful. I love the premise I have 100% had some of these conversations

2 people found this helpful

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Download it on a whim… A favorite!

I really loved the pacing and narration of the story. A lot of surprising twists and turns but not in a dark way. I hope to see more from this author

2 people found this helpful

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Surprising art piece

I didn’t know what I was getting into. I was listening and loving it. I loved the scenes of him at work. I was rooting for his video date.

And then the twist. That was weird. Not sure how I feel about it.

Still glad I listened.

I don’t get to go to small theater original productions, but I feel like that’s what I just experienced. This is art. It doesn’t give you all the answers, doesn’t tell you how to feel, and leaves space for each observer to take away their own experience.

Yeah, glad I listened.

Performance and production were superb.

2 people found this helpful

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  • Jo E.
  • 06-23-22

Excellent performances and production

Excellent performances, especially Hale Appleman. Solid production. The story kept me engaged until the end.

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Profile Image for MICHAEL W.
  • MICHAEL W.
  • 04-25-22

A disappointing and clunky play

A disappointing and clunky play (nicely performed but a horrible text that can't be saved by the actors). Mostly unlikeable and two-dimensional characters, undigested and badly integrated politics and a pointless ineffective 'twist' finale. Shame, there were a few glimpses of some funny, naturalistic dialogue moments, but suffocated by dross and predictable identity politics of the most artificial kind.