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Publisher's Summary

A debut thriller for fans of Lucy Foley and Liz Moore, Dark Things I Adore is a stunning Gone Girl-esque tale of atonement that proves that in the grasp of manipulative men, women may momentarily fall. But in the hands of fierce women, men will be brought to their knees.

Three campfire secrets. Two witnesses. One dead in the trees. And the woman, 30 years later, bent on making the guilty finally pay.

The year 1988. A group of outcasts gather at a small prestigious arts camp nestled in the Maine woods. They’re the painters: bright, hopeful, teeming with potential. But secrets and dark ambitions rise like smoke from a campfire, and the truths they tell will come back to haunt them in ways more deadly than they dreamed.

The year 2018. Esteemed art professor Max Durant arrives at his protégé’s remote home to view her graduate thesis collection. He knows Audra is beautiful and brilliant. He knows being invited into her private world is a rare gift. But he doesn't know that Audra has engineered every aspect of their weekend together. Every detail, every conversation. Audra has woven the perfect web.

Only Audra knows what happened that summer in 1988. Max’s secret, and the dark things that followed. And even though it won’t be easy, Audra knows someone must pay.

A searing psychological thriller of trauma, dark academia, complicity, and revenge, Dark Things I Adore unravels the realities behind campfire legends - the horrors that happen in the dark, the girls who become cautionary tales, and the guilty who go unpunished. Until now.

©2021 Katie Lattari (P)2021 Blackstone Publishing

What listeners say about Dark Things I Adore

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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Beautiful, Ugly, Dark & Deep

Wow… This is truly an artistic, clever literary work of fictional art. I am giving it only 4 stars overall because it took me soooo long to get into it. It’s so slow, serious, deep, poetic and dark that I won’t be able read or listen to another one like this for a while.

I have a huge girl crush on Nicol Zanzarella, so as usual, she kept me in the game when I might have given up. It was worth it.

4 people found this helpful

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good contemporary horror

found this to be a good contemporary twist on a horror story, and found the narration to be excellent

2 people found this helpful

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Best Crime-Noncrime Story of the Moment

It is also a thriller-non thriller, a mystery at its best. The story is well woven, intricate, layered, with its own rhythm. Each psychological detail is nakedly bare. The art theme is unmistakable. Follow it and every piece will fall in exact place right to the very end. Not a book for skip and skim reading. Narrators' perfomance is superb.

1 person found this helpful

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Tense and beautiful, not a Mystery

I think most readers will see the climatic finish coming from miles away. Yet the way the story is told compelled me and I felt the tension of the plot right up to the end. The use of descriptions of the thesis project art pieces and found objects incorporated annoyed me at first because it seemed long and detailed and puzzling (especially for an audio version of the book) as to the relevance to the story. Then after a few of these I saw how the writer used the images and found objects to fill in so many blanks. Before that Eureka it felt like the description of the boat measurements in Moby Dick. (But just a few minutes at a time to start chapters, so I exaggerate.)

This is not a mystery novel. It is a plunge into trauma, its causes and ever rippling effects. You can’t look away (even as work and chores and other routines beckon.)