• Digital Madness

  • How Social Media Is Driving Our Mental Health Crisis—and How to Restore Our Sanity
  • By: Nicholas Kardaras
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Todd Ross
  • Length: 11 hrs and 14 mins
  • 4.6 out of 5 stars (14 ratings)

1 title per month from Audible’s entire catalog of best sellers, and new releases.
Access a growing selection of included Audible Originals, audiobooks and podcasts.
You will get an email reminder before your trial ends.
Your Premium Plus plan is $14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Digital Madness  By  cover art

Digital Madness

By: Nicholas Kardaras
Narrated by: Jonathan Todd Ross
Try for $0.00

$14.95/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.

Buy for $20.90

Buy for $20.90

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

From the author of the provocative and influential Glow Kids, Digital Madness explores how we’ve become mad for our devices as our devices our driving us mad, as revolutionary research reveals technology's damaging effect on mental illness and suicide rates—and offers a way out.

Dr. Nicholas Kardaras is at the forefront of psychologists sounding the alarm about the impact of excessive technology on younger brains. In Glow Kids, he described what screen time does to children, calling it “digital heroin”. Now, in Digital Madness, Dr. Kardaras turns his attention to our teens and young adults and looks at the mental health impact of tech addiction and corrosive social media.

In Digital Madness, Dr. Kardaras answers the question of why young people’s mental health is deteriorating as we become a more technologically advanced society. While enthralled with shiny devices and immersed in Instagram, TikTok, Twitter, Facebook and Snapchat, our young people are struggling with record rates of depression, loneliness, anxiety, overdoses and suicide. What’s driving this mental health epidemic? Our immersion in toxic social media has created polarizing extremes of emotion and addictive dependency, while also acting as a toxic "digital social contagion”, spreading a variety of psychiatric disorders. 

The algorithm-fueled polarity of social media also shapes the brain's architecture into inherently pathological and reactive "black and white" thinking—toxic for politics and society, but also symptomatic of several mental disorders. Digital Madness also examines how the profit-driven titans of Big Tech have created our unhealthy tech-dependent lifestyle: sedentary, screen-staring, addicted, depressed, isolated and empty—all in the pursuit of increased engagement, data mining and monetization.

But there is a solution. Dr. Kardaras offers a path out of our crisis, using examples from classical philosophy that encourage resilience, critical thinking and the pursuit of sanity-sustaining purpose in people’s lives. Digital Madness is a crucial audiobook for parents, educators, therapists, public health professionals, and policymakers who are searching for ways to restore our young people’s mental and physical health.

A Macmillan Audio production from St. Martin's Press

©2022 Nicholas Kardaras (P)2022 Macmillan Audio

What listeners say about Digital Madness

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    12
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    8
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    9
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Couldn’t finish it, so repetitive and superfluous and dramatic.

Listened for the first 3 hours then skipped around to see if other sections were better. There’s just so much unnecessary content in it and sooo much repetition. And it’s really dramatic about hating big tech CEOs, it gets annoying when it’s repeated so much. The beginning was so dramatic that it felt exhausting. I think it would’ve been better to mix more solutions throughout and give real life examples from clients/people he knows and show how their lives changed for the better (without sharing personal info of course). I didn’t really learn anything, and I knew of all the lab tests and data he shared. I think it’s becoming more common knowledge.

Also the insults about religion weren’t needed, comparing it to dictators and mocking its existence just felt like a personal jab at something he dislikes and added nothing to the topic. And then it was ironic he talked about Philosophy like it was his religion and noted the same positive effects and practices people use in religion for healing so that was confusing near the end. Sounds like he mostly dislikes Christianity but says well Buddhism isn’t really a religion so it’s cool.

Basically the lesson is spend less time with technology and more time with family and friends and experiencing the real, natural world while also thinking outside yourself and make the world a better place with your positive influence and unique skills. (And go watch After Skool videos, they are more concise about this topic, well made, creative and free).

Some people may love the book but I couldn’t finish it.

1 person found this helpful

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Tom Middleditch
  • Tom Middleditch
  • 09-18-22

Hyperbolic Hyperbole to the Maxxx

The topic is worthy and the issue present, but the author has buried their points under such overblown hyperbolic hyperbolicisms that he seems to be presenting all evil everywhere as being caused by electrons. that's not his point at all, but someone who might need to be convinced of these points would leave this books assuming this was some raving Luddite who can't understand why kids these days are this and that

there are better books on this topic, but if you need some pumping up, this could be for you