• Does the Noise in My Head Bother You?

  • A Rock 'n' Roll Memoir
  • By: Steven Tyler
  • Narrated by: Jeremy Davidson
  • Length: 13 hrs and 2 mins
  • 4.1 out of 5 stars (967 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

"I've been mythicized, Mick-icized, eulogized and fooligized, I've been Cole-Portered and farmer's-daughtered, I've been Led Zepped and 12-stepped. I'm a rhyming fool and so cool that me, Fritz the Cat, and Mohair Sam are the baddest cats that am. I have so many outrageous stories, too many, and I'm gonna tell 'em all. All the unexpurgated, brain-jangling tales of debauchery, sex, drugs, transcendence, chemical dependence you will ever want to hear."

The son of a classical pianist straight out of the Bronx of old Archie comics, Steven Tyler was born to be a rock star. Weaned on Cole Porter, Nat King Cole, Mick, and his beloved Janis Joplin, Tyler began tearing up the streets and the stage as a teenager before finally meeting his "mutant twin" and legendary partner, Joe Perry. In this addictively listenable memoir, told in the playful, poetic voice that is uniquely his own, Tyler unabashedly recounts the meteoric rise, fall, and rise of Aerosmith over the last three decades and riffs on the music that gives it all meaning.

Tyler tells what it's like to be a living legend and the frontman of one of the world's most revered and infamous bands - the debauchery, the money, the notoriety, the fights, the motels and hotels, the elevators, limos, buses and jets, the rehab. He reveals the spiritual side that "gets lost behind the stereotype of the Sex Guy, the Drug Guy, the Demon of Screamin', the Terror of the Tropicana." And he talks about his epic romantic life and his relationship with his four children.

As dazzling, bold, and out-on-the-edge as the man himself, Does the Noise in My Head Bother You? is an all-access backstage pass into this extraordinary showman's life.

©2011 Steven Tyler (P)2011 HarperCollins Publishers

What listeners say about Does the Noise in My Head Bother You?

Average Customer Ratings
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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

Does the Noise in My Head Bother You? A Rock 'n' R

Like all rock star books that I've read in the past, it's your typical super-talented, super-successful, rockstar, drug addict, self-proclaimed rock god, book that I absolutely love to read/listen to. I don't think the book comes off as well as is could have with Jeremy Davidson narrating it. Especially after hearing the last 15 minutes, that was actually narrated by Steven Tyler. His narration puts a completely different perspective on the book. When he talks about his children and the band, you can hear the love and the self-disappointment in his voice. You can actually hear Steven think as he speaks. You can tell he lived it. The ups and downs. You can't be a drug addict for decades and not screw up everybody around you. Only the great Steven Tyler can Tylerize words like Steven Tyler. He makes his living with words, he invented laying the smack down like no other! He has his own unique vocabulary. Steven sounds his age in the narration and Jeremy sounds like the younger Steven Tyler who is completely full of himself. It just doesn't do the book justice. Keif' Richards had Johnny Depp do his narration and it sounded great! Hey Steven, go back and do the narration yourself. The book deserves it!

23 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

EXCELLENT MEMOIR

This book couldn't have been any better unless Steven had narrated it himself. It is very thoughtful, entertaining, and well written. I became so engrossed while listening to it, that I felt like I was sitting down one on one with him. This could be in part good writing / good narrating. You get to hear his side of the tabloid writings, his side of the band feuds, his side of the marital problems, etc. There is so much musical theory in this book as well that I could sit down and listen to it again to get more understanding of it. On a side note.....Steven Tyler "IS" Aerosmith. There would not be an Aerosmith if Steven was not fronting it. The boys are excellent musicians without a doubt but IMO, they would not have gotten where they are today without Steven on vocals.

16 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Reads true to the man and true to music

This reads as unadulterated Steven Tyler, his language, his world view, coming through clear. What really makes the book worthwhile is Tyler's love of music and his focus on that. The narrator is fine, though sounds like more of a tough guy than Tyler himself.

Yes the endless litany of drugs, the sense of a whole life spent stoned, is a little disappointing, but that's part of the Tyler package...love of music and language and a mostly unexamined love of altered states...

13 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars

Do not waste your money or time

I truly disliked this book and I am a Steven Tyler fan. It was disjointed and jumped all over the place. It was difficult to see what he is really like behind all the bravado. Obviously, he is still the oldest living teenager in his mind kind of like Tommy Lee. That and the constant rhyming he does in the book seems childish. I couldn't finish it to the end.

10 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars

I WAS a big Aerosmith fan...

For years I believed that Aerosmith was one of the lucky bands. A band who finally found enduring staying power because they had ditched the pharmacological crutch that typified their early years, and were able to draw from the darkness music that was able to reach people on a deep level. I'm not sure that's the case any longer.

When I saw this audiobook available earlier today I very quickly spent a credit to get it. Everyone knows that Steve Tyler is a world class wordsmith, and the book being written as if he just dictated it CAN be entertaining. For me the problems arrive with the first three chapters (as far as I've gotten so far) glorifying his use of drugs. Three hours into it I know that he spent his teenage years drunk, high, and tripping. That's a pretty common story for people in his age range. However, where most of his colleagues look back on that time feeling lucky to have made it out the other side, he seems to look back on those experiences as the "good 'ol days". Don't get me wrong these events are all part of who made him the man he is, but where is the redemption? Where is the acknowledgement that he got lucky? Does he never look back at his Janice Joplin, Jimmi Hendrix, Kieth Moon, John Bohnam, or any of the other musical greats whom he idolized, and realize that he is lucky to have avoided their fates? Sadly at the three hour mark the answer is "No". To be fare, drugs aren't the only things that he idolizes. He also idolizes Woodstock, Hippie communes, and all sorts of "universal vibration" theories. Honestly he is not the man I hoped he was, but hey maybe the book will get better...

On the plus side, Jeremy Davidson does a fantastic job giving voice to the hallucinogenic tripe that has so far been vomited onto the page.

9 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars

Should've stopped after the 1st half.

What would have made Does the Noise in My Head Bother You? better?

Surely Tyler's got more interesting stories from his adult years than how many girls and drugs he did? Maybe it got less raunchy further into the second half... I don't know, I had to turn it off. It was such a drastic change from the first half of funny, not raunchy stories from his childhood and teen years when Aerosmith began.

Has Does the Noise in My Head Bother You? turned you off from other books in this genre?

Yes. I have Sammy Hagar's Red in my wish list but I'm reluctant to buy it.

Which character – as performed by Jeremy Davidson – was your favorite?

?? Tyler's THE character.

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Does the Noise in My Head Bother You??

I'd have to take a look at the second half to figure out why it's SO disconnected from the first half which I loved.

Any additional comments?

If you want to hear a lot of bragging about how many drugs and girls Tyler did, you'll like it. The second half anyway. The first half is humorous and endearing.

6 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars

Disappointing

I am a 40 something year old who grew up listening to Aerosmith. However, I have heard more about sex and drugs in this book than I ever wanted to. And the language is totally outrageous. It's sad that one of the greatest lead singers in the history of bands decided to take this route to stardom. Just think what he could have accomplished had he not been drunk and stoned all the time. Caution to all parents: do not let your children, especially teenagers read this book. Tyler talks extensively about how easy it is to get "legal" drugs. I would hate to see this book breed a generation of "legal" drug addicts.

If this is truly an accurate account of his life, I have to say it makes me sad to think that by purchasing his music, I had any part in funding his addictions.

6 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars

Out of Control Ego

I know celebs can get a bit "heady", but Steven went over the edge. Most of his tales I found very hard to believe and insincere. Somebody needs to explain the correct definition of "Lead Singer Disease" (LSD), he totally misses the point.

Aerosmith as a whole ROCKS.

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars

Watch "Behind the Music" instead

I guess the fact that I've seen the Aerosmith "Behind the Music" episode on VH1 and have long been a fan of their music means there weren't going to be any earth-shattering surprises in this memoir for me. I have a lot of respect for Steven Tyler, his amazing talent, and his incredible resilience - but the book? I could take it or leave it. Maybe if he had narrated it himself I would've liked it more - I did find the narration to be a mismatch. The sex, drugs, and rock n roll are all here - the story of his life and how he came to be a megastar is all here - if you are curious and want the racy details, then go ahead and give this one a try.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

The Real Steven Tyler

Having watched the antics of Aerosmith over the year, this book felt more inside Steven's head. There's more to him than just Aerosmith and I found him to be sensitive, kind and yet still a bit crazy. I thoroughly enjoyed the book. Steven's comments at the end made it even better.

3 people found this helpful