• Engines of Oblivion

  • The Memory War, Book 2
  • By: Karen Osborne
  • Narrated by: Sophie Amoss
  • Length: 14 hrs and 57 mins
  • 4.7 out of 5 stars (10 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Karen Osborne continues her science-fiction action and adventure series the Memory War with Engines of Oblivion, the sequel to Architects of Memory - the corporations running the galaxy are about to learn not everyone can be bought.

Natalie Chan gained her corporate citizenship but barely survived the battle for Tribulation.

Now corporate has big plans for Natalie. Horrible plans.

Locked away in Natalie’s missing memory is salvation for the last of an alien civilization and the humans they tried to exterminate. The corporation wants total control of both - or their deletion.

©2021 Karen Osborne (P)2021 Blackstone Publishing

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Absolutely stunning

Engines is the beautiful conclusion to Architects of Memory. Osborne not only answers the questions you’re left with at the end of the first book, she opens a whole new set of them by Chapter 12 of book 2. What a gorgeous exploration of memory and what it means to be human.