• Eve in Exile and the Restoration of Femininity

  • By: Rebekah Merkle
  • Narrated by: Rebekah Merkle
  • Length: 4 hrs and 40 mins
  • 4.9 out of 5 stars (649 ratings)

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Eve in Exile and the Restoration of Femininity

By: Rebekah Merkle
Narrated by: Rebekah Merkle
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Publisher's Summary

The swooning Victorian ladies and the 1950s housewives genuinely needed to be liberated. That much is indisputable. So, First-Wave feminists held rallies for women's suffrage. Second-Wave feminists marched for prohibition, jobs, and abortion. Today, Third-Wave feminists stand firmly for nobody's quite sure what. But modern women - who use psychotherapeutic antidepressants at a rate never before seen in history - need liberating now more than ever. The truth is, feminists don't know what liberation is. They have led us into a very boring dead end.

Eve in Exile sets aside all stereotypes of mid-century housewives, of China-doll femininity, of Victorians fainting, of women not allowed to think for themselves or talk to the men about anything interesting or important. It dismisses the pencil-skirted and stiletto-heeled executives of TV, the outspoken feminists freed from all that hinders them, the brave career women in charge of their own destinies. Once those fictionalized stereotypes are out of the way - whether they're things that make you gag or things you think look pretty fun - Christians can focus on real women. What did God make real women for?

©2016 Canon Press (P)2019 Canon Press

What listeners say about Eve in Exile and the Restoration of Femininity

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    3 out of 5 stars

More thought experiment than practical advice

This was well written and well read. I saw many people confused about who her audience is. I think it is pretty clear that Christian women was primarily her audience. I would agree that the content of this book is greatly geared towards Christian mothers. She does address single women, but it is pretty brief. But just because she doesn't exhaustively mention every predicament a woman in the world could be in, doesn't mean her thoughts don't have value for a variety of women. I think they do. I also appreciated that while this book is clearly a Christian, biblical view on femininity, she doesn't use "Christianese." She speaks in plain terms, doesn't mince her words, so even women who ardently oppose her view or who are not familiar with the Bible, would walk away at least knowing what she said, even if They don't like it. I find a lot of contemporary books on the subject leave you feeling like you think you agree with the author, but you really aren't sure because they use loaded terms without defining them or redefining them in such a way that it no longer has any grounding in the current discussion.

I will say, her book is more of a thought trajectory. just putting out some big ideas and thoughts without fleshing them out. I don't have a problem with that because I think the discussion on gender these days is so heated, that people over qualify every single thought they put out there to the point they don't actually say anything substantive. Mrs. Merkle may not flesh out all her big ideas, but she puts them out there clearly and without embarrassment so it is at least a solid diving board into deeper waters. some of these big ideas include, "What if the feminists of the early 20th century had gathered in prayer, rather in bitterness over their situation relative to men's?" "What would it look like if our culture didn't demean homemaking?" "What would it look like if women took their crafts and excelled at them rather than bemoaning how mundane they appear?" these give you a sense of the themes in the book.

But despite taking a Biblical, more conservative, view on femininity, she does not let conservatives or societies of the past off the hook. She does point out how the feminist are correct to not make past societies a romantic ideal that we shoukd recreate. She also correctly calls out Christians who want to recreate their idea of what the past was like, rather than what the Bible actually says. this leads her to point out how conservatives can hate Biblical femininity just as much as progressive feminists. she gives the example of how too many conservatives have the idea that women should go to college to "have something to fall back on" in case they don't get married or even dont see a need to educate their girls because they will "Just become housewives." Mrs. Merkle is pretty clear to call this out as a low view of women and femininity and homemakers. She points out that Biblically, women are to learn and teach one another, so education is extremely important and valuable, to say nothing of the influence homemakers have over their children. She also addresses (briefly, but clearly) that many women are scientifically gifted and should not deny their gifts, talents and contributions in male domonated fields.

Overall, it was a good springboard for more conversation. I appreciate her directness. it does not dive too deep into the practical application of these ideas, if that is what you are looking for. she Also writes a lot in analogies and metaphors. albeit, they are good metaphors, though sometimes repetitive, at least They are good. nothing is worse than a bad metaphor. But if you don't appreciate thought experiments communicated through metaphors, you may not appreciate the writing style.

6 people found this helpful

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Time to Clean Up this Mess Called Feminism

What a clarion call for every Christian woman who always knew the World's idea of feminism was nothing more than a soiled bag full of false idols. Rebekah Merkle fleshes out our suspicions with succinct logic, eloquent language, and Spiritual leading. It's this kind of book study by women of Faith, when applied and put into action within our personal lives and homes, that can reshape the notion of "woman's ministry" and our world at large. When did we forget the adage " The hand that rocks the cradle rules the world? " Mrs. Merkle pinpoints the time and place, giving readers a much needed history lesson, reaching back to 1759 England and Mary Wollstonecraft and then moving forward to modern day culture and the current attempts to redefine gender, the "right" to murder the unborn of the womb, and the grotesque nature of present day feminine "empowerment," conjuring up images of Cardio B's most recent Grammy performance. However, the history is only half of her methodical argumentation as she leads reader's to the purpose and invitation of her thesis: Be the glory of your husband, your children, and your home by discovering the freedom to be had in truly modeling Christ in full humility and servanthood. She argues there is no such thing as little and insignificant in being a "helpmeet," a mother, or maker of that holiest of spaces called Home. This reader wholeheartedly agrees and prays young women discover this Truth sooner rather than later. Our culture- in the midst of upheaval- is ripe for rebuilding, and women must realize and embrace their uniquely glorious part to play in reclaiming the Truth that has long been available to them. Bravo, Mrs. Merkle, for once again calling us to "taste and see" that the Lord is good and His ways are, indeed, the only Way!

2 people found this helpful

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Inspiring, motivational 💪🏻

You want to know what real Woman Power looks like? It looks like this! This book will inspire and motivate you to use those God given talents to beautify your God given situation.
Blessing sisters! Keep learning about and loving God!

2 people found this helpful

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Truly Remarkable! Must-read for men and women!

Merkle puts into words everything I've been thinking and observing for a long time about my own family and the direction of our country. She uses the Bible to support her ideas but I would argue that this book is a must-read even for non-Christians. I know many women, myself included, who haven't figured out religion but they have figured out that there's something missing from the home. Its US! I know many working wives and mothers who are dissatisfied and unfulfilled but can't figure out why. I'm a former career woman turned homemaker and I've never been happier. I couldn't quite put my finger on it until I read this book. It's by design! Consider this secular women newly enlightened. Many thanks to Mrs. Merkle 🙏

1 person found this helpful

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Encouraging and Convicting

This book is a must read for all women. It is both convicting and encouraging and contained solid biblical truth. Many things I had never heard before but such pivotal truth every woman should hear. I'm recommending it on to many friends!

1 person found this helpful

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Read it, women!

This is truly one of the BEST books I have ever read or listened to.

1 person found this helpful

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The Faithful Wounds of a Friend

This piece is the faithful wound of a friend to our generation, to women in particular but a helpful start to men understanding what godly femininity is. In the corpse of feminism let the beautiful vine of biblical sexuality grow full of fruit.

If you're thirsty for more of this and would appreciate a male voice on the subject with regard to godly masculinity, I recommend Masculine Christianity by Zachary Garris as well.

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A MUST READ

Hands down, the best book I have read about femininity; what it is to be a Christian woman, what God has called us to, and the destruction that feminism has brought to the world. A great building up and practical encouragement for women, a very beneficial read. I can't say enough good things about this book.

1 person found this helpful

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This book was a breath of fresh air

I really enjoyed this book and recommend to all young Christian women, especially married women.

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every Christian women should read this. so good.

I loved this book. I'm going to listen to it again. very encouraging. if you are a Christian women you should definitely read this

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  • Kellie
  • 05-25-22

Read This Now!

This book has been absolutely life changing. Every woman, and I’d even recommend her husband, should read it!

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  • Twynholmblack
  • 07-16-20

Gloriously eye-opening book

As a result of reading this book my eyes are opened much more to the glories that God works through women. Rebekah helped me see more clearly how the gospel is shown in the design of women to enflesh the gospel.

I would also commend her turns of phrase which make her points memorable.

I also love the way the book builds up so that the last few chapters sing out but based on all that has gone before.

I am going to have to give it another listen.

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  • Karen
  • 08-27-22

Just listen.

I could have said "worth the listen," however in light of the rare truth explored by Rebekah in this brave book I encourage the listener to hear this book right through to the end.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 03-07-21

Unapologetic and Refreshing

Merkle was very unapologetic about her views on all topics and it was refreshing.

Also a very great analysis of 1 Corinthians 11.

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  • Carlin
  • 10-14-20

Outstanding

Terrific. Probably the best overview of Biblical womanhood that I've heard, and also some of the most thorough criticism of feminism from a Biblical worldview. I'd highly recommend it to anyone who wants to think deeply about Biblical womanhood and to not be conformed to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by renewing their minds to be more like Christ.