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Publisher's Summary

Gilgamesh, son of the goddess Ninsun and the mortal Lugalbanda, is the arrogant king of the vibrant city of Uruk, a sprawling desert metropolis. In an attempt to quell Gilgamesh’s oppressive behavior, the gods fashion the wild man, Enkidu, to be a companion to the king and to calm his errant ways. The two form an inseparable bond, embark on a wild misadventure, and commit a series of blunders that offend the very gods who created Enkidu. What happens next sends Gilgamesh on an epic journey to find his ancestor, Utnapishtim the Faraway, to learn his story of survival and unlock the secrets of immortality.

©2018 Tamara Agha-Jaffar (P)2019 Tamara Agha-Jaffar

What listeners say about Gilgamesh of Uruk

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Ancient Epic Tale

I received a free copy of this audiobook from Audiobooks Unleashed in exchange for an honest review.
Although the ancient poem found in fragments fascinated me, I almost passed this modern version by because I couldn't read the cover. Once I listened to it, I recognized the story from the ancient Mesopotamian mythology. The narration was adequate.

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Gilgamesh and the flood

I had heard of this story but never read the Gilamesh of Uruk version and there are other version not just the one in the Bible which we are taught was true but now we find out it was not and most likely they are stories passed down generation after generation. In so many ways the Bible version and this version are so much alike something are different like the kind of boat and what happen after the flood. Now I am not saying the flood did not happen but we believe things without looking outside of the box and we see stories are told about one God or as in this version many Gods they are the same story a parent would tell a child or group around a fire as we do today. The only difference is the two main characters a man and his wife are given eternal life on an island surrounded by the sea of death. The characters are well written by whoever the original author was the details and the adventures of Gilgamesh was a person like to survive and grow thru happy and bad times. Gilgamesh is young, foolish but a king of Uruk otherwise a brat who needs a good ass spanking and told to grow up but he is blind and can not see all he has as king all he wants to do is blame everyone for his faults. And the journey he takes is a journey we all take in someway as we grow. In the beginning he a child minded king but in the end you see a complete change in him.
The Bible version is good but this one is so much better.

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  • Mo
  • 08-17-20

Give the baker the dough

As we say back home, “give the baker the dough even though they might eat half of it”, which loosely means stick with the professionals! Tamara’s Gilgamesh reads like an English classic, but is viscerally a work of Assyriology, probably in no small part because of Tamara’a own background. Tamara captures timeless themes especially through the voice of Gilgamesh which resonates with many “fertile crescent” folks I suspect. Favourite Gilgamesh quote (spoiler alert): “it’s not my fault; Shamash made me this way.”
In short, highly recommended. And the narration by the author herself is equally great!

2 people found this helpful