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God and Man at Yale  By  cover art

God and Man at Yale

By: William F. Buckley Jr.
Narrated by: Michael Edwards
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Publisher's Summary

This is the book that launched William F. Buckley, Jr.'s career. As a young, recent Yale graduate, he took on Yale's professional and administrative staffs, citing their hypocritical diversion from the tenets on which the institution was built. Yale was founded on the belief that God exists, and thus that virtue and individualism represent immutable cornerstones of education. However, when Buckley wrote this scathing expose, the institution had made an about face: Yale was expounding collectivism and agnosticism. This classic work shows Buckley as he was and is: dauntless, venturesome, bold, and valiant.
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What listeners say about God and Man at Yale

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Good book....narrated by a $10 answering machine

Outside of narration, it's a must read for parents with ideas on education. Basically Marxists have penetrated education and want to turn Americans kids into tools of self destruction. Damn, I guess this is why the Ivy League seems to be a factory of young socialists.

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Still Relevant Today

Buckley's message, that traditionalism has been steamrolled in academia by modernist relativism and its trappings is still as relevant today, and maybe more so, than it was when he wrote God and Man At Yale. There are flaws in the logic in places, for instance, when Buckley argues that the students, not the faculty, should have more say in the spirit of the curriculum, implying that students at Yale wanted religion over atheism and then just a few pages later complains that a professor who was "ardently atheist" taught classes that were "hugely attended." If a lot of the time and place particularities are strained through the overall message, that is, that somewhere along the line, traditionalism became taboo in American colleges, the book ages well. As a college humanities instructor with conservative leanings, I can certainly relate to much of what Buckley has written here, if, at times, I wince a bit at his line of reason.

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True then More true today!

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Clear, consise and complete, well written expose of the culture in the US world of Academe post wwii and a starting point on the audit trail of the evolution of this culture today. A muyst read for those for whom today's culture seems amoral.

What was one of the most memorable moments of God and Man at Yale?

The confirmation that someone my senior had a worldview that was similar to mine.

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brilliant

brilliant

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It's basically a Yale doxing from the 50's

Buckley just talks about how left wing his professors were in Yale and calls them out by name.

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Dated political tract

I come to this book as a fan of Buckley whom I esteem as the shining example of conservatism in a more genteel era. This book written shortly after his time at Yale in the late 1940s is an indictment of his alma mater for its twin sins--a hostility or at best indifference to Christianity and its bias toward New Deal policies and economic thought and against traditional conservatism. A couple of things--while I wasn't exactly shocked by these "revelations" (it was only a few years after FDR's presidencies after all and universities trend liberal anyway), I thought it was rich that this ultra privileged white male was so indignant that anyone could possibly question the tenets of Christianity and capitalism. Bottom line, this is a book to enjoy for the wit and stylistic charm of a very precocious young man. His career as one of the icons of modern conservatism (the GOP before the cult of Trump) got off to a fine start here.

On a less pleasant note, the reader of this book has a fine voice but he had the grating habit of smacking his lips and clicking throughout. This marred the performance and had me waiting as if for the drop of water in a leaking faucet.

1 person found this helpful

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Our issues are older than we think

Buckley reminds us that the encroachment of radical secularism and collectivism is not a new phenomenon. Written in 1951 those forces were already deeply entrenched in our universities, largely explaining why we are today so troubled!!

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Great book

I wasn’t sure what I thought about reading this book, but I am glad I gave it a shot. It had me hooked from the first paragraph all the way to the end. This book was very relatable to my experience at Bellevue University.

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Well-read conservative classic, dated

God and Man at Yale was written in 1951 shortly after William F. Buckley, Jr. graduated the undergrad at Yale. The preface, which is long, was written by the same author 25 years later.

The book is an in-depth study of the tendency of the faculty, students, and administration of Yale to Keynesian / Fabian socialism and atheism / agnosticism either through active pursuit of those ends or through inaction in the face of those who would pursue them. At the time the book was written, Yale was known as a "conservative" powerhouse and a Christian school, and the administration played up this image to win the financial gifts of the alumni, who, according to the author, it kept blissfully unaware of the new trends at the University. The book calls for the University and alumni to abandon banner of "academic freedom," which it used to guard the left-leaning faculty, and to narrow its enforced orthodoxy to exclude all faculty not committed to Christianity, "individualism" (capitalism, free market economics, small government, etc.), and democracy.

The book is dated and something of a time capsule. Some arguments withstand the test of time. Others are interesting precisely because of what they reveal about the past. The days when Yale (or any other major university) was a private institution in more than name or a bastion of conservatism are beyond memory. Buckley was prescient in seeing where things were heading, in the de facto nationalization and secularization of higher education. Nevertheless, he hardly realized just how radical this transformation would be.

Probably the most dated part of the book is its emphasis on capitalism, individualism, and democracy—its appeals to the consumer choice of the wealthy benefactors of higher education. Looking back it is easy to see that these wished for remedies were in many ways the true cause of the ailment.

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Today's news? Fab read! (Listen)

Mr Buckley well describes the moral landslide in which we are caught. Schools still indoctrinate. Parents are wise to be involved.