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Publisher's Summary

In the wake of the George Floyd murder and calls for defunding the police, Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd reflects on our changing points of view on law enforcement through a personal prism - the life and times of her father. For four decades, Detective Sergeant Michael J. Dowd served on the Washington, DC, police force, guarding presidents and catching killers. Meanwhile, his daughter grew up as a child of the 1960s, embracing liberal politics and evolving into a journalist some presidents might have thought they needed to be guarded from. As a result, it took decades for Dowd to fully embrace her father’s bravery and make peace with the pride she felt in his work. She has done so with heartfelt eloquence in this deeply personal and profound look back at a man who represented the good that lives within us, even those who wear a gun and badge.

©2021 Maureen Dowd (P)2021 Audible Originals, LLC.

About the Creator

Maureen Dowd, winner of the 1999 Pulitzer Prize for distinguished commentary and author of three New York Times bestsellers, became an Op-Ed columnist in 1995. In August 2014, she also became a writer for *The Times Magazinev. Born in Washington, Dowd began her journalism career in 1974 as an editorial assistant for The Washington Star, where she later became a sports columnist, metropolitan reporter and feature writer. In 1983, she joined The New York Times as a metropolitan correspondent and then moved to The Times’s Washington bureau in 1986 to cover politics. Dowd has covered nine presidential campaigns, served as The Times’s White House correspondent, and written "On Washington," a column for The Times Magazine. In the run-up to the 2004 presidential election, G. P. Putnam published her first book, Bushworld, which covered the presidency and personality of George W. Bush. After Bushworld quickly climbed the bestseller list, Dowd switched from presidential politics to sexual politics in another bestseller, Are Men Necessary? When Sexes Collide, released in 2005. In addition to The New York Times, Dowd has written for GQ, Vanity Fair, Rolling Stone, The New Republic, Mademoiselle, Sports Illustrated, and others. Her column appears every Sunday.

What listeners say about Good Cop

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Good daughter

It was wonderful to read something humanizing about law enforcement. I’ve been in the career for over ten years and have seen a negative shift toward law enforcement. This was refreshing. I’m not a crier, but I felt a tear in the corner of an eye.

For any cops, or cop families, that give this a listen, you may, or may not, agree with the politics, but it’s a fair representation of a good cop. I hope my children remember me and my service the same way of the author writes of her father. That’s on me as a father and as a cop.

If the author happens to read these, I’m sure your father would be pleased with you and your work.

23 people found this helpful

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Yesterday Today

I love history. This brief story reveals that since the beginning of the last century there were people then, as now, who stood up for those society looked down upon. Some of the issues that I stand up for today appear to “not be new.” Thank you.

15 people found this helpful

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Typical Liberal.

It was good until she started talking about George Floyd and Trump. Hard pass. On to the next.

14 people found this helpful

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Pathetic but expected

Imagine reading something that a biased wannabe journalist that stills suffer from TDS. She constantly has to throw a dig at anyone that leans Conservative especially if she can use the word “Trump”. Even when talking about her father who is against abuse of women and children. (Like 99% of normal Men) She uses a movie that John Wayne was in in which he dragged a woman at some point in the movie. It made her father sick but it’s important to stay at its a movie and John Wehn has never been accused of using women. Its a constant theme which gets old very quickly.

The Narrator was fine.

8 people found this helpful

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Meh

Lost me. she references “good cops” as if they are a rare unicorn. Liberal tears and regrets. Ha

7 people found this helpful

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Lovely ode to her father

I read the reviews about liberal this and liberal that and rolled my eyes as I listened because those people obvious are extremist conservatives. I say that because the book had very few personal political references and one would have to be radically far right to twist those minimal references into the book being liberal trash. I thought the book was a beautiful nod to the good cop in her life, her father.

6 people found this helpful

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Share a story

II feel like this woman is writing this book to tell us how great her father was because she missed the opportunity to Tell him herself

6 people found this helpful

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Unfortunate

What could of have been a great tribute to her father became a tool to share personal politics.

5 people found this helpful

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Just a reflection on her father’s life

This isn’t necessarily a reflection on what a “good cop” is but rather a reflection on her father’s life; a man she perceived to be a “good cop.” I’ve read some of Maureen Dowd’s work before and was prepared for the smugness of a liberal elite.

5 people found this helpful

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Good Story About Law Enforcement

Really enjoyed the rawness of the author. Such a good story. Thank you for the story.

4 people found this helpful