Try our newest plan – access a growing selection of included Audible Originals, audiobooks, and podcasts.
You will get an email reminder before your trial ends.
Your Plus plan is $7.95 a month after 30 day trial. Upgrade or cancel anytime.
Buy for $13.96

Buy for $13.96

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

Groundbreaking for the time in which they were written, the vampire stories of the 1800s have inspired many modern writers. Enjoy the thrilling stories that originated the genre of vampire fiction. Includes: "The End of My Journey", by Lord Byron (1816); "The Vampyre", by John Polidori (1819); "The Family of the Vourdalak", by Aleksei Tolstoy (1839); "Varney the Vampire", by James Malcolm Rymer (1847); "Carmilla", by Sheridan Le Fanu (1872); "A True Story of a Vampire", by Eric, Count Stenbock (1894); and "Count Magnus", by M. R. James (1904).

©2012 AudioGO (P)2012 AudioGO

What listeners say about Great Classic Vampire Stories

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    122
  • 4 Stars
    63
  • 3 Stars
    17
  • 2 Stars
    4
  • 1 Stars
    2
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    140
  • 4 Stars
    39
  • 3 Stars
    8
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    110
  • 4 Stars
    54
  • 3 Stars
    19
  • 2 Stars
    3
  • 1 Stars
    1

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

An heirloom collection of the undead

"For we knew not the month was October, and we marked not the night of the year." Edgar Allan Poe.

Like many story collections, this one is uneven. Fortunately, most of the stories are good and a few may be great. You'll find your own favorites. My three are "The Vampyre," "Carmilla," and "Count Magnus."

For me, Polidori's "The Vampyre" is a particular treat. It was always fascinating to imagine details about Lord Ruthven and hearing the story read brought him to life. Almost.

Le Fanu's "Carmilla" is a must-listen for any collector of supernatural tales. The female vampire embodies a particular combination of allure and horror.

"Count Magnus" is my favorite M.R. James story, but I've never considered the eponymous character, though undead, to be a vampire. Still, whatever else he might be, he is unforgettable.

Simon Vance's narration is well-suited to the old-fashioned tone and content of this collection.

8 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

classic vampire tails at their best

loved the variety of tales and variety of authors, much more interesting than modern vampire stories.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

More Interesting Than Terrifying

Not being up to speed on more recent iterations of vampires (Buffy, Twilight, etc.) for me the interest here is the view afforded of those creatures before the B movies, Halloween costumes and cereal boxes of my childhood.

Rather than bats, castles, and black capes, here we have vampires who walk about in broad daylight. None of them shun garlic or mirrors. Only one has a Transylvanian accent. So far from arriving, “by night, in a carriage drawn by two black horses,” writes Eric Count Stenbock, “our vampire arrived by the commonplace means of the railway train, and in the afternoon.”

Some stories are better than others, of course. Volunteer has a point: they all tend to sound somewhat similar. Vampires being vampires, that's unavoidable: they find a victim, drain their life, finis. I’m still mystified by James Malcolm Rymer’s contribution. The closest to our stock ideas of vampirism, it begins with “Chapter One” then, at the end of 15 minutes and 49 seconds (in which a victim is found and her life drained), we pass on to the next story. No Chapter Two.

I agree with Ms. Baumann that Polidori’s “The Vampyre”, Le Fanu’s “Carmilla”, and M. R. James’ “Count Magnus” are the picks of this particular litter, set apart by the variations they ring on the basic story arc. For that reason I would also add Bram Stoker's piece, the unacknowledged eighth in this collection of seven, wherein it seems Dracula actually saves a life--though I suspect only to claim it for himself later.

As always, Simon Vance hands in a superb performance.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

zzzzzzzz

Reading a dictionary is far more exciting than this trash. Absolutely mind numbing. zero stars if I could

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Phenomenal and true excellence

Unbridled creativity in the vampiric genre, the cradle of a horror tale who's evergreen, lingering essence refuses to permanently meet the grave just as the namesake for which it is titled- this volume of the classic tales surrounding vampires is a must have and the only criticism I can offer is the brevity of the excellent material which I wish would have continued at least threefold as long.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

A bit dry.

A bit dry and lags at points but, a good collection of classic vampire stories.

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Tolstoy worth the read.

Tolstoy story is the only one worth listening to. The others are too heavy on saying rather than showing, and move slowly.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Gets to be a bit much

I enjoyed this for the first couple of hours, but at some point the stories all started to sound the same.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Enjoyable

This is a nice selection of vampire stories for a relatively small collection. The End of My Journey and Varney the Vampire are more snippets than stories, but the others are good choices, The Family of the Vourdalak in particular.
The End of My Journey, Byron. (1816) Weirdly this is just a piece of an unfinished story. For some unknown reason Simon Vance has chosen to narrate too quickly at times, and it is distracting from this bit of story. Basically, a guy dies in Turkey and has requested to be buried there under very odd circumstances.
The Vampyre, by John Polidori. (1819) This is the story that originally introduces the vampire as an aristocratic, mesmerizing, nobleman. The story follows Aubrey, whose meeting with Lord Ruthven is to have a devastating effect on him. The story is generally overshadowed by the circumstances that caused its' conception. It was written as part of a contest which also produced Mary Shelley's, Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus; a tough act to compete with.
The Family of the Vourdalak, by Aleksei Tolstoy. (1839) I loved this story. It was riveting, eerie, atmospheric; everything a good vampire story should be.
Varney the Vampire, by James Malcolm Rymer. (1847) This is one of a series of weekly pamphlets aka penny dreadfuls. It's very short and a cliffhanger, which was probably the norm. It is hard to rate something that feels like the first chapter of a longer story.
Carmilla by Sheridan Le Fanu. (1872) This is one of the original stories that created the classic vampire mythos that we know today.
A True Story of a Vampire, by Eric, Count Stenbock. (1894) This is a creepy good story about a young boy, a free spirit, who has the life sucked out of him.
Count Magnus, by M. R. James. (1904) James' subtlety leaves much to the imagination, while building up the suspense.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

What a good surprise

Simon Vance is great. bonus for Bram Stoker for the last book! very entertaining listen

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for BClose
  • BClose
  • 09-17-21

Superb Stories.

These are superb vampire stories written by great writers and beautifully read.It was a joy from start to finish.Highly recommended.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Mr. Sam A. Williams
  • Mr. Sam A. Williams
  • 08-26-21

Great vampire's book

I really enjoyed all the stories and I finished it very fast. Easy to listen.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Flashoneforall
  • Flashoneforall
  • 06-02-22

Wonderful Journey through Vampire Literature

Stories are taken in chronological order from Byron to M R James. Great performance. A good grounding in early vampire literature. Thanks Audible for this free audio book.
The Radio 4 archive of ‘in our time’ has an episode on Polidori’s The Vampyre which references some of these other stories.