• Group

  • How One Therapist and a Circle of Strangers Saved My Life
  • By: Christie Tate
  • Narrated by: Christie Tate
  • Length: 10 hrs and 6 mins
  • 4.4 out of 5 stars (1,434 ratings)

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Group

By: Christie Tate
Narrated by: Christie Tate
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Publisher's Summary

A Reese's Book Club Pick * New York Times Best Seller

The refreshingly original and “startlingly hopeful” (Lisa Taddeo) debut memoir of an over-achieving young lawyer who reluctantly agrees to group therapy and gets psychologically and emotionally naked in a room of six complete strangers - and finds human connection, and herself.

Christie Tate had just been named the top student in her law school class and finally had her eating disorder under control. Why then was she driving through Chicago fantasizing about her own death? Why was she envisioning putting an end to the isolation and sadness that still plagued her despite her achievements?

Enter Dr. Rosen, a therapist who calmly assures her that if she joins one of his psychotherapy groups, he can transform her life. All she has to do is show up and be honest. About everything - her eating habits, childhood, sexual history, etc. Christie is skeptical, insisting that that she is defective, beyond cure. But Dr. Rosen issues a nine-word prescription that will change everything: “You don’t need a cure. You need a witness.”

So begins her entry into the strange, terrifying, and ultimately life-changing world of group therapy. Christie is initially put off by Dr. Rosen’s outlandish directives, but as her defenses break down and she comes to trust Dr. Rosen and to depend on the sessions and the prescribed nightly phone calls with various group members, she begins to understand what it means to connect.

“Often hilarious, and ultimately very touching” (People), Group is “a wild ride” (The Boston Globe), and with Christie as our guide, we are given a front row seat to the daring, exhilarating, painful, and hilarious journey that is group therapy - an under-explored process that breaks you down, and then reassembles you so that all the pieces finally fit.

©2020 Christie Tate. All rights reserved. (P)2020 Simon & Schuster, Inc. All rights reserved.

Featured Article: Here to Help—The Best Therapy Audiobooks and Podcasts


Seeing and hearing other people—whether a stranger, a friend, or a celebrity—talk about their struggles with mental health helps make us feel less alone. And that sense of community often encourages those struggling to take steps towards treatment. There is nothing wrong with needing help and wanting to feel better—and some truly exceptional mental health audiobooks and podcasts are available to keep you company on that journey.

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What listeners say about Group

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  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
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Unrealistic and Unethical

**if you are considering therapy yourself please
avoid reading Group.

I read 2/3 of Group and dnf. I personally am in group therapy and have a lot of concerns with this book.

Tate’s recount of therapy seems exaggerated, unrealistic, and unethical. In her first session she is articulating her feelings and goals with such detail. For someone who has trouble connecting with other people and doesn’t open up to anyone, it seems completely unbelievable that she would be so vulnerable 5 minutes into her first session.

**You don’t need to know why you’re unhappy or what your goals are to start therapy.

Then, she’s placed into a group where their therapist gives them crazy assignments (ie commands). For example, he tells Tate to tell a classmate that she is a “cock tease.” My therapist would never “command” me to do anything, let alone the crazy things this therapist tells his patients to do.

The therapist also has absolutely no respect for confidentiality. I read that people in this book were unhappy with Tate sharing their personal stories, and two years ago she was in the news when her child asked her to take their personal info off her blog and she refused. All because her therapist taught her that secrets are not meant to be kept.

30 people found this helpful

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Too explicit

Although I appreciate her honesty about therapy and getting treatment, the sexual references were too explicit for me personally. I felt like this was more of a book about sex therapy with the constant descriptions of her intimate life. While the book is good for normalizing taboo topics, might be too much for some people.

23 people found this helpful

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Depressing

OMG could this book be any more depressing?!?! Starting with the very 1st chapter nothing but I want to kill myself, I'm a bulimic, my family doesn't understand me, I can't find a boyfriend, I'm friendless...and on and on. No thank you. After 3 chapters of this I'm returning it and would not recommend it to anyone.

13 people found this helpful

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Better on Paper

After reading Maybe You Should Talk to Someone (a must read) I was interested in therapy non fiction so I tried this book out. The narration is terrible, I thought I’d be excited to hear the author read her own words but, it’s comes across like a bad actors struggling to place emotions to a monologue. I’m sure she’s a decent writer but she was not made to narrate an audiobook. Maybe but the book if you’re interested but, definitely don’t get the audio book. Wasted credit.

7 people found this helpful

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Terrible

The author read it and she's awful. Too monotone and expressionless. She over uses 'fuck' as if she's trying to be a impactful. She uses scenarios that are clearly an effort at trying to be shocking, but end up just feeling odd and ill timed. just a horrid waste of time and money.

6 people found this helpful

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Horrible narration

I’ve heard great things about this book, and may try it in print. The narration was so flat, I didn’t make it beyond the first chapter.

6 people found this helpful

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no no no

I couldn't even get past the first chapter as the narration was booooring. Save your credit.

6 people found this helpful

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Made me feel icky

I stopped reading at chapter five. This author’s mouth and thoughts were so nasty that I could not relate to her on any level. After chapter five I did go back and finish reading the last two chapters and post script knowing there would be a happy ending. I knew there had to be at least one positive thing about this book. I felt like the author over embellished every single detail of this book. It did not feel authentic to me. I do not recommend this book and wish I never would have listened to the first five chapters since I can’t un-hear the author and her voice as she reads about her life.

5 people found this helpful

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Stick to Writing

The story is good enough, but the author needs to stick with writing and let someone else do the performing. It was painful enough that I couldn’t stay with it.

2 people found this helpful

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Not bad. Give it time.

I see a lot of negative reviews for the book. I didn't think the book was bad. If you give it time, you'll enjoy the story and will be interested in the characters. I will say that if you are interested in this topic, Maybe You Should Talk To Someone is a better book with a better narrator.

2 people found this helpful