• Hannibal

  • Rome’s Greatest Enemy
  • By: Philip Freeman
  • Narrated by: John Lescault
  • Length: 5 hrs and 29 mins
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars (55 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Telling the story of a man who stood against the overwhelming power of the mighty Roman empire, Hannibal is the biography of a man who, against all odds, dared to change the course of history.

More than 2,000 years ago one of the greatest military leaders in history almost destroyed Rome. Hannibal, a daring African general from the city of Carthage, led an army of warriors and battle elephants over the snowy Alps to invade the very heart of Rome's growing empire. But what kind of person would dare to face the most relentless imperial power of the ancient world? How could Hannibal, consistently outnumbered and always deep in enemy territory, win battle after battle until he held the very fate of Rome within his grasp?

Hannibal appeals to many as the ultimate underdog - a Carthaginian David against the Goliath of Rome - but it wasn't just his genius on the battlefield that set him apart. As a boy and then a man, his self-discipline and determination were legendary. As a military leader, like Alexander the Great before him and Julius Caesar after, he understood the hearts of men and had an uncanny ability to read the unseen weaknesses of his enemy. As a commander in war, Hannibal has few equals in history and has long been held as a model of strategic and tactical genius. But Hannibal was much more than just a great general. He was a practiced statesman, a skilled diplomat, and a man deeply devoted to his family and country. 

Roman historians - on whom we rely for almost all our information on Hannibal - portray him as a cruel barbarian, but how does the story change if we look at Hannibal from the Carthaginian point of view? Can we search beneath the accounts of Roman writers who were eager to portray Hannibal as a monster and find a more human figure? Can we use the life of Hannibal to look at the Romans themselves in an unfamiliar way - not as the noble and benign defenders of civilization, but as ruthless conquerors motivated by greed and conquest?

©2022 Philip Freeman (P)2022 Blackstone Publishing
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: History

What listeners say about Hannibal

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very excellent book on Hannibal; highly recommend

this was a great story telling of Hannibal it had just enough detail about Hannibal himself and his impressive strategies to hold my attention. I've read many histories of Alexander, Caesar by several authors. this is the first one I read on Hannibal and was quite an eye-opener. it gives you a feeling as to why Hannibal was so feared by the room of this time but admired by the later times of Rome for example Caesars admiration of Hamilton's skill as an opponent of Rome. later Napoleon admired Hannibal. the only greater General was Alexander. Alexander's only hero was Achilles, who of course was mythical. of those who really lived Alexander, Hannibal and perhaps Caesar where the greatest generals. this is a great book about Hannibal, I highly recommend.

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Good short synopsis, poor narration

Great intro to Hannibal, but the narration sounded computer generated or heavily edited. intonation was awkward and sounded like the narrator had no idea what the sentence was and was emphasizing words at random.

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Another good one

I enjoyed the authors book on Alexander so I had been anticipating this one and I was pleased with it as well. I was not a huge fan of the narrator voice as it sounded a bit computer generated but it was tolerable.

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Shows Hannibal’s Greatness

Hannibal was a truly incredible military leader over 2000 years ago. This book does a good job in a balanced way of showing that. History usually isn’t kind to the loser of wars as the victors usually write it.

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Cavalry or calvary?

My only problem was the repeated mispronunciation of cavalry. Otherwise a good listen, albeit short.

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boredom with a capital D

after the 1st chapter, I had hoped it would keep me from falling asleep while driving and it didn't. what a waste of $15!!!