• Her Gates Will Never Be Shut

  • Hope, Hell, and the New Jerusalem
  • By: Bradley Jersak
  • Narrated by: Tim Welch
  • Length: 7 hrs and 18 mins
  • 4.6 out of 5 stars (138 ratings)

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Her Gates Will Never Be Shut  By  cover art

Her Gates Will Never Be Shut

By: Bradley Jersak
Narrated by: Tim Welch
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Publisher's Summary

Everlasting hell and divine judgment, a lake of fire and brimstone - these mainstays of evangelical tradition have come under fire once again in recent decades. Would the God of love revealed by Jesus really consign the vast majority of humankind to a destiny of eternal, conscious torment? Is divine mercy bound by the demands of justice? How can anyone presume to know who is saved from the flames and who is not?

Reacting to presumptions in like manner, others write off the fiery images of final judgment altogether. If there is a God who loves us, then surely all are welcome into the heavenly kingdom, regardless of their beliefs or behaviors in this life. Yet, given the sheer volume of threat rhetoric in the Scriptures and the wickedness manifest in human history, the pop-universalism of our day sounds more like denial than hope. Mercy triumphs over judgment; it does not skirt it.

Her Gates Will Never Be Shut endeavors to reconsider what the Bible and the Church have actually said about hell and hope, noting a breadth of real possibilities that undermines every presumption. The polyphony of perspectives on hell and hope offered by the prophets, apostles, and Jesus humble our obsessive need to harmonize every text into a neat theological system. But they open the door to the eternal hope found in Revelation 21-22: the City whose gates will never be shut; where the Spirit and Bride perpetually invite the thirsty who are outside the city to "Come, drink of the waters of life."

©2009 Brad Jersak (P)2015 Brad Jersak

What listeners say about Her Gates Will Never Be Shut

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    2 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Excellent book, poor audiobook

What disappointed you about Her Gates Will Never Be Shut?

Only the very poor production quality of the audio presentation. The source material is wonderful.

This is the worst audiobook I've ever heard, from a technical standpoint. It was edited poorly and seems to contain more chapter breaks than the printed book, sometimes at very strange intervals. The narrator repeats lines throughout the book, and within the first half hour the book repeats an entire ten minute section. I almost stopped listening then.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Her Gates Will Never Be Shut?

Jersak's final chapter and afterword are beautiful.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

The narrator is not a terrible reader, but he is clearly not prepared or qualified to read this title. For example, he fails to interpret the author's biblical abbreviations correctly. When the text of the book reads "Rev.", he says "Revelations." When it reads "1 Cor." he simply says "Corinthian." And most befuddling, he reads "Mal." not as "Malachi" but as "Malthusians," which is not a Bible book at all. Under any circumstance this would be unacceptable, but in a work of such scholarly distinction it is an offense. Jersak's work deserves much better.

Any additional comments?

Read the paperback of Her Gates Will Never Be Shut. It is a valuable and commendable book.

20 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Important work - Narrator ruins the listen...

Would you listen to Her Gates Will Never Be Shut again? Why?

I would very much like to listen to the book again but the narrator ruined the experience. He sounds like he's yelling - sneering almost as if he doesn't like the book or his job as a narrator.

What did you like best about this story?

Not a story - it is a work of theology,

5 people found this helpful

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Narration is nothing like Brad Jersak

I am sure this narrator means well but the overly dramatic and angry tone of delivery does not match the hopeful message of this book. Narrators need to do their homework and listen to audio of the writer's speech. Sorry, but I will have to return it. Perhaps I will buy the audio version with a different narrator. (I volunteer to audition should you need someone.)

4 people found this helpful

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Narrator was distracting

I echo comments others have stated about the narrator. Mispronouncing words, not knowing book abbreviations, saying “Revelations” instead of “Revelation”, etc. Like someone else said....he wasn’t prepared for this.

Embarrassingly produced/edited as well. There were multiple occasions where minutes of narration was repeated.

3 people found this helpful

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Good, but feels incomplete

I like the author’s style and thoughtfulness. He asks the right questions, and mentions all the relevant scriptures... but I feel like he doesn’t interact with all of them fully. At the beginning, he promises to give his take on all the “infernalist” passages, and he even mentioned all of the ones that came to my mind. But I don’t think he actually covered them all. And in the end I wasn’t completely convinced, even though I wanted to be. I guess I wanted more. But all that said, he wrote gently and with love for his brethren, and I respect the guy.

My only other thought is, the voice of the reader is rough. He sounded like an old baptist preacher, but one who never bothered to learn how to say the name Origen. Unless “Oregon” is a valid option? I’d never heard quite a few of his pronunciations. But he didn’t ruin it for me, either.

Good book! It didn’t completely convince me, but it’s got a lot of good points and it’s definitely worth the listen.

2 people found this helpful

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Narration was terrible!

Good book was very distracting by bad narration. One probably won’t appreciate the book until he reads it in print or digital

1 person found this helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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skipped the audio version

A painful listen, but very good material. Get the kindle instead. I have to reread much of this book due to the amateur performance. It would not be so bad if it was free, but definitely not worth a credit.

1 person found this helpful

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Rare balanced thought on theology

I have read, listened to, and own hundreds of books on these subjects. I found the author's balanced approach of pulling all these together in a humble yet astute manner quite refreshing. Loved it! I'll surely be listening to this many times.

1 person found this helpful

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Great book, had to get past the narrator

The book was very helpful; I appreciate Jersak's insights.
However, the narrator's voice, tone and inflections were tiresome rather than pleasant to listen to.
He also made many errors in his reading of the abbreviations of Biblical books, calling Malachi Malthusians or something like that from its abbreviation Mal. And I believe he called N.T. Wright "New Testament Wright". He was clearly unprepared and not qualified for this reading.
Poor quality as an audiobook, but does the job.

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Narrator Doesn't Understand Subject Matter

This is one of the best surveys of both Biblical sources and Early Christian History in regards to HELL (esp. Infernalism/Penal Substitutionary Atonement, Conditionalism/Annihilationism, or Universalism).

However, the narrator hilariously misunderstands certain words and abbreviations found in the source material.

Some funny examples:

(1) The famous biblical scholar "N.T. Wright" is called "New Testament Wright", (2) "According to Phil..." as if some guy named "Phil" wrote the Christ hymn from chapter 2 of Paul's letter to the "PHILIPPIANS", and (3) "Mal." is a reference to the Biblical book of Malachi, but the narrator inexplicably says "Malthusians" which is literally not a thing.

Nevertheless, while I frequently had to pause, rewind, and consider what the narrator SHOULD have said, I found the mistakes mostly entertaining and not too distracting from the source material.

The book is still worth the listen, but I'd recommend the TEXT copy of the book for anyone who isn't already well-versed on the topic, because the narrator's gaffs might be confusing for anyone trying to explore the topic without previous exposure to the sources.

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  • Simon Burrows
  • 02-24-20

Good book, editing of recording

The book was interesting but there were repeated sections that had clearly been intended to be edited out. The recording should be re-edited

2 people found this helpful

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  • mr
  • 07-04-20

Good book, terrible audio quality

Good book but the audio is borderline distorted and it sounds like every sentence is a individually recorded segment because they have absolute silenced after every sentence rather than including ambient noise.

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  • Mark
  • 11-25-15

An academic and rounded case for questioning our traditional view of hell

Jerzak presents a well educated case for untying the knots that Christianity has tied around the worlds understanding of hell. During a time of deserved cynicism towards traditional concepts of the Gospel and its relationship with the afterlife, the Church need to re-evaluate its own understanding. Jerzak has bought credibility to the argument against eternal conscious torment, and it's use by a retributive and angry God. That said, his conclusions do not rest with either the annihilationists or the universalists, instead he rightly leaves the reader with their knots untied and the certainty that in the end God wins, love wins and Satan has 'no hope in hell'.

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  • Jigsaw doer
  • 05-06-18

beautiful, hope full theology.

as in above title. read a bit to quick though. not enough pacing by reader.