• Honestly, Red Riding Hood Was Rotten!

  • The Story of Little Red Riding Hood as Told by the Wolf (The Other Side of the Story)
  • By: Trisha Speed Shaskan
  • Narrated by: anonymous
  • Length: 7 mins
  • 4.2 out of 5 stars (73 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

You think you know the story of Little Red Riding Hood? THINK AGAIN! This retelling of the classic story, told from the wolf's perspective, will give you a fresh spin on this famous tale. Was the wolf just really hungry for apples? Was Little Red Riding Hood rotten? This fun fractured tale will leave you with a whole new understanding of the classic story.

©2014 Trisha Speed Shaskan (P)2013 Capstone Publishers, Inc.

What listeners say about Honestly, Red Riding Hood Was Rotten!

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Great!

I am really like this audio book. nice content. excellent narration in this content.
Fantastic story

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Terrible

The wolf compares the females to apples the whole time and insinuates that they were rotten for finding themselves pretty. Red is described as rotten because she admires her appearance, not because she actually does bad things.
In conversation with other works of Red Ridinghood literature, which have historically been warning narratives regarding sexuality, this book feels like a perpetrator victim blaming.
As a story in its own right, it is boring and takes no novel approach to the story.
At least the narrator did a great reading.