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How to Negotiate at Work: From Job Offers to Raises  By  cover art

How to Negotiate at Work: From Job Offers to Raises

By: Rachel Campagna,The Great Courses
Narrated by: Rachel Campagna
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Publisher's Summary

Everyone is negotiating all the time—so much so that you might not even realize how frequently you do it. Consider ordering a pizza for the family. Some of you want mushrooms, but some of you want onions. Maybe you opt for half and half with the toppings, or you get mushrooms and onions on all of it, or you decide to stick to plain cheese—which everyone likes. That’s negotiating!   

In the business world, people negotiate on multiple levels—within their department, between companies, across industries. They negotiate for job offers, higher salaries, better benefits, and other important things. So, they need to learn to negotiate well. 

Join Rachel Campagna for six information-packed lectures focusing on the fundamentals and framework of negotiating. Learn specific tactics for negotiating your job offer and for negotiating a raise, how to use influence, and how to deal with tricky or unexpected issues that pop up in the process.  

Rachel has spent her career researching, teaching, and working with companies and managers, with a focus on negotiation, conflict management, and building and repairing relationships. In this course, she’ll show you how to apply these proven tactics and tools to your own negotiations at work—from job offers to raises.  

You’ll come away from this course armed with knowledge. You’ll learn how to prepare and develop strategies and tactics to use for a negotiation. You’ll learn how to manage the conversation in order to create value and to achieve your goals. And, you’ll learn the importance of thinking forward to the future relationship with your counterpart. But most important, you’ll come away with an improved sense of self-confidence to use when facing your next negotiation scenario—be it pizza or a promotion.

©2022 Audible Originals LLC (P)2022 Audible Originals LLC

About the Creator and Performer

Rachel Campagna is an Associate Professor of Management at the Peter T. Paul College of Business and Economics at the University of New Hampshire. She has been recognized for her excellence in teaching, in the areas of negotiation and decision-making, and for her research, which examines trust in negotiation and workplace contexts. As a behavioral scientist, Rachel is fascinated by the choices people make in difficult contexts, and in particular, how emotion and trust-breaking affect people’s perceptions and behaviors. Her research has been published in the field’s top journals, such as the Journal of Applied Psychology and Organizational Behavior & Decision Processes. Rachel was also a TEDx speaker, presenting the counterintuitive idea that anger can be used to create value instead of break it, when the recipient of anger reframes the situation from a different, more passionate, and less angry perspective.
Complementing her academic career, Rachel is also a leadership coach and consultant, applying her knowledge from her work to empower business leaders and improve their well-being and success. Rachel has a particular interest in working with female business leaders, and those aspiring to be leaders.

What listeners say about How to Negotiate at Work: From Job Offers to Raises

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mehhh

It was okay until the author decided to whine about the supposed "gender pay gap". Wah, Implicit gender biases, wahh. Individual value is far more important than gender. True value is determined by the value an individual adds to an organization. I'm sorry that people weren't interested in women's soccer. I'm sorry that it doesn't sell tickets. The value of the women's soccer league is determined by the number of tickets they sell and not simply by their association with the US Soccer Federation. If they don't sell the same tickets as the men's games, then they're not as valuable to the organization. If a female employee doesn't contribute the same or more labor value to a corporation, then they're not as valuable. Has nothing to do with gender. Author recites some common negotiation strategies in this lecture.

4 people found this helpful

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boring

Boring book mostly focused on gender in pay scales with zero information on actually conducting a negotiation.

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Great information I hope to use

The information was invaluable. Though the narrator stumbled in their dialogue at points and distracted from understanding the information.

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  • Z'
  • 10-30-22

How to not put yourself first!

Some of the content of the course is fine and gives you some good ideas on how to negotiate in different situations, but it left a bad taste in my mouth for how much it downplays the importance of money. The instructor gives an example about how a professor negotiated hard for a high salary and got it, and then years later he got a higher offer from another university, went back to give them a chance to match it, the dean refuses to so he goes to the other school. This is explained as a negative, that the bridge was burned from day 1 and maybe if he had been willing to take a lower salary, the dean wound have matched it. Sounds to me like the professor made out well, he got paid what he knew he was worth and was able to leverage that salary to get even more from another school which clearly valued his talents.

The whole course is filled with nonsense like this, like how if you push too much on salary or ask for raises too often the company will think you only care about money more than loyalty. Isn't that what the point of a job is? Maybe if you work for a family-owned small business where people work there for their entire career, but the current work environment is like that, and companies will gladly cut you the second they can. The salary discussion is usually done through HR anyway, not the person who's your direct manager who will just be happy to get a competent worker. I'm sure that all of these managers who care more about relationships over money will be happy to take a pay cut, right?

It's just hard to take this course seriously, it's completely out of touch with the current working environments.

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Helps You Prepare for the Big Negotiation

Most of us have a little trouble when it comes to standing up for ourselves and effectively negotiating for what we need. We can stand up for others without difficulty, but for ourselves…that’s another question.

This very useful short Great Courses book helped me to think about strategies to get what I want and to help me prepare for the big negotiation. I don’t know that it will ultimately lead me to success, but by helping me prepare properly it’s increasing my confidence to have those conversations.

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  • Alex
  • 09-20-22

Does not get the facts right

Asserts flat out that "the gender pay gap is real", even though it has been debunked numerous times, and blames it on an the equally fantastical concept of 'implicit bias'. She also stated that the US women's football team fought for "equal pay". Ironically, she talked previously about the amount of value created by negotiations, while seemingly being oblivious of the fact that obviously a team that is not as popular, does not create an equal amount of value - and therefore hardly has a claim to "equal pay".

Furthermore, we were able to hear that negotiation by "other gender identities" has not been studied, but that the speaker thinks they definitely should be.

I was hoping to hear about negotiation, but instead this turned out to be a political lecture, based on debunked disinformation. If the professor falls for claims that have been refuted so often, one wonders what else in this lecture is something that one cannot rely on.

The presentation is not all that bad but the speaker does have a bit of a fried Valleyspeak accent, which is somewhat grating.

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  • Christos Z.
  • 09-19-22

didn't finish it

Gave up halfway through, maybe later is better, who knows. It goes too fast to absorb things and at parts is biased. This mother of a 4 year old gives you a feminist vibe with gender pay gap etc. I wanted to listen to something that will improve my negotiation skills, not "study after study proves that women football players get less than men"