• Hyperobjects

  • Philosophy and Ecology after the End of the World (Posthumanities)
  • By: Timothy Morton
  • Narrated by: Dave Wright
  • Length: 8 hrs and 52 mins
  • 4.3 out of 5 stars (139 ratings)

1 title per month from Audible’s entire catalog of best sellers, and new releases.
Access a growing selection of included Audible Originals, audiobooks and podcasts.
You will get an email reminder before your trial ends.
Your Premium Plus plan is $14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Hyperobjects  By  cover art

Hyperobjects

By: Timothy Morton
Narrated by: Dave Wright
Try for $0.00

$14.95/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.

Buy for $19.95

Buy for $19.95

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

Global warming is perhaps the most dramatic example of what Timothy Morton calls "hyperobjects" - entities of such vast temporal and spatial dimensions that they defeat traditional ideas about what a thing is in the first place. In this book, Morton explains what hyperobjects are and their impact on how we think, how we coexist with one another and with nonhumans, and how we experience our politics, ethics, and art.

Moving fluidly between philosophy, science, literature, visual and conceptual art, and popular culture, the book argues that hyperobjects show that the end of the world has already occurred in the sense that concepts such as world, nature, and even environment are no longer a meaningful horizon against which human events take place. Instead of inhabiting a world, we find ourselves inside a number of hyperobjects, such as climate, nuclear weapons, evolution, or relativity. Such objects put unbearable strains on our normal ways of reasoning.

Insisting that we have to reinvent how we think to even begin to comprehend the world we now live in, Hyperobjects takes the first steps, outlining a genuinely postmodern ecological approach to thought and action.

©2013 Timothy Morton (P)2014 Redwood Audiobooks

What listeners say about Hyperobjects

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    83
  • 4 Stars
    33
  • 3 Stars
    9
  • 2 Stars
    8
  • 1 Stars
    6
Performance
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    57
  • 4 Stars
    28
  • 3 Stars
    18
  • 2 Stars
    7
  • 1 Stars
    11
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    82
  • 4 Stars
    19
  • 3 Stars
    5
  • 2 Stars
    9
  • 1 Stars
    5

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Imperfect, sprawling, hypnotic, brilliant

This work has changed my thinking and everyday experience -- my highest praise. It's not that I swallow whole every assertion made there about a narrative flow of the "end of the world," though a credible if very non-rigorous model is sketched. This is not a formal work trying to bring a microscope to the exact problems we face as a species. What uniquely grabbed me was the radical approach to meaning and experience that peels off every comforting and supposedly "safe" surface or refuge and instills an amazing vertigo and bracing penetrating discomfort about -- pretty much whatever one clings to. I admire someone with the courage to rip into my stodgy mental structures and at least shake them up. And aside from its content, its form is arresting too. I think this a great performance in the audiobook genre specifically. The narrator's intonations coupled with the writing style make it a work and experience of -- philosophizing art -- an incisive commentary and a prose poem in the same moment. The least appealing parts to my mind were perfectly fine (and occasionally brilliant) descriptions of modern art works and their rhetorics -- I preferred when the author put his mental scalpel right into the stuff of everyday experience and thought, and turned the same in effect inside out. If one wants to open doors of perception, there's no need to make recourse to drugs. Just strap this sucker on and take a walk, anywhere. It is like walking inside a vast many-faceted work of art.
People more versed in such schools as poststructuralism may not have this beginners' delight in the arresting clashes with the comfortable I find here. That's my next stop.

15 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

worst narrator ever.

This audiobook has the most painfully dry, monotone, and off beat narrator I've ever heard.
The rhythm and tone of his voice sounds as if he is reading an agonizingly long and complex inventory list of office supplies.

Because of the narrators off beat, list-like, rhythem, it makes this already dense and long-winded book very difficult to understand.

This is exceptionally disappointing because the book itself is very interesting, creative, and complex.

I'm very dissapointed. The narrator makes this audiobook painful and almost unbearable to listen to.

Please remake this audiobook with a better narrator!!!

10 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

WTH is he talking about?

The fear of writing or thinking like this author is partly responsible for why I never did drugs. I could not ever finish the book for fear of losing my sanity!

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Narration

I agree with the earlier comments about the narration, which is disastrous. Numerous foreign names and words are mispronounced to the point of being unintelligible. Overall the reading style itself is robotic and sounds almost computer-generated at times; it sounds like the narrator is reading a phone book and has no clue what he's talking about.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

niceeee

sometimes the narrator pronounces names and concepts entirely wrong but he tried really hard! It was excellent overall

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Compelling theory, bland presentation

For a theoretical narrative with such gravitas, it is presented in a disappointingly monotone expression.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Viscous Verbage

One of the most important books I’ve ever encountered. A must read for any human or non-human being.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Chewable, indigestible

I found this work to be extremely inspiring. the things that I have learned and the conceptions that I take away I will chew on for a very long time, but I don't think that I will ever really get an answer. Morton does a fantastic job of weaving deep disciplinary discussion with pop culture and a sometimes scathing humor.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars

Dude's tone is perfect, but

he pronounces so many things wrong!

This book is great. I don't feel like I have the right words for a review nor that I can be so presumptuous that I can imagine what others will make of it. The book feels like a living thing about a living thing, it's hard to capture with something as static as a review.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

so much to meditate upon

I loved it, there's alot of information and it's quite intriguing to think about. something interesting to obsess over

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 06-22-19

Read by a computer

Or at least sounds like it...probably best to buy the actual book instead. Sad!

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 07-17-17

Intesting Topic

This an interesting subject but it is quite a demanding book, in terms of language and content.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Hettie Judah
  • Hettie Judah
  • 10-14-22

Why was this narrated by a robotic voice rather than Timothy Morton?

Why was this narrated by a robotic voice rather than Timothy Morton? It made it impossible to engage.

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Leopold
  • Leopold
  • 04-05-21

Terrible

Morton doesn’t understand many of the concepts he’s talking about. The book reminded me of the Sokal Affair.

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 03-23-20

Check the sample before purchasing!

I can't bare to listen to the narrator's voice, such a strange performance! Can't get through any amount of the book. It's a shame because I loved reading The Ecological Thought, might just have to buy the book instead. Definitely one to check the sample on before buying to see if you can listen to it.

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 09-15-19

Failed to communicate the concept

I feel as if there are some good concepts in this book but the author completely fails to communicate them. I came to this book after reading ‘The Age of Surveillance Capitalism ‘ by Shoshana Zuboff and ‘New Dark Age’ by James Bridle both of which mention this book.

The hyper object itself may be on a different dimension but the explanations should not be. Most of the time if feels as if the author actually doesn’t want the reader to understand the concepts at all and that writing the book is just an opportunity to cite the philosophers he’s read, the artists you’ve never heard of and the cool bands he listens to.

I gave this book one star for the image on the cover. The picture of the iceberg tells me more about hyper objects than anything the author has to say on the subject.