• Is Atheism Dead?

  • By: Eric Metaxas
  • Narrated by: Eric Metaxas
  • Length: 16 hrs and 48 mins
  • 4.8 out of 5 stars (973 ratings)

Try our newest plan – access a growing selection of included Audible Originals, audiobooks, and podcasts.
You will get an email reminder before your trial ends.
Your Plus plan is $7.95 a month after 30 day trial. Upgrade or cancel anytime.
Buy for $36.37

Buy for $36.37

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

Is Atheism Dead? is an entertaining, impressively wide-ranging, and decidedly provocative answer to that famous 1966 Time cover that itself provocatively asked “Is God Dead?” 

In a voice that is by turns witty, muscular, and poetic, Metaxas intentionally echoes C. S. Lewis and G. K. Chesterton in cheerfully and logically making his astonishing case, along the way presenting breathtaking - and often withering - new evidence and arguments against the idea of a Creatorless universe. Taken all together, he shows atheism not merely to be implausible and intellectually sloppy, but now demonstrably ridiculous. Perhaps the only unanswered question on the subject is why we couldn’t see this sooner, and how embarrassed we should be about it.

©2021 Eric Metaxas (P)2021 Blackstone Publishing

What listeners say about Is Atheism Dead?

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    852
  • 4 Stars
    65
  • 3 Stars
    28
  • 2 Stars
    12
  • 1 Stars
    16
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    692
  • 4 Stars
    104
  • 3 Stars
    48
  • 2 Stars
    9
  • 1 Stars
    13
Story
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    757
  • 4 Stars
    60
  • 3 Stars
    21
  • 2 Stars
    11
  • 1 Stars
    15

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

A fun but very frustrating listen

Choosing a star rating for this book was difficult because at times I did genuinely enjoy it, but I had to wrestle with removing stars rapidly for how quickly and how explicitly this book defies its own strong assertions.

In the earliest chapters, Eric Metaxas carefully and diligently loads the large, multi barrel shotgun he uses to repeatedly shoot himself in the foot as the book goes on. Unlike Checkhov's gun, he does not leave it for the third act -- he begins unloading early, and unloading often, and I was left with fewer questions for science than I was left for who this book is ostensibly (as opposed to actually) aimed at.

Let's go over some quick points that made me want to write this review, but in a style I can only really describe as rambly and only semi-coherent. My apologies, but I promise there is a point.

First, in order to even pick up a book like this and add it to the reading list, one must have a certain level of intellectual curiosity -- and there are genuinely fantastic scientific anecdotes in these pages to sate a curious mind! But quickly, you come to the parts where he asks you to (please) be incurious as he comes to conclusions that science cannot answer this or that question. And this is where he begins unloading his carefully prepared shotgun into his own foot, or feet.

The earliest chapters spend a significant amount of time discussing how absurd the idea of God of the Gaps theory is, and how science is proving God did whatever scientific thing he is talking about at the time. But then, when speaking about the universal parameters, he goes on to say science can't explain certain constants, certain facets of the universe, and they haven't managed yet. Therefore, scientists should "cry uncle."

Do you see where he undercuts himself? Science doesn't understand something to this very day, therefore God did it? He describes a gap in our knowledge, and then BAM! Summons God to fill that gap.

When speaking about abiogenesis, again he builds up a case for why science hasn't been able to answer this question yet, necessitating a divine creator. Again, building a gap, and against using God to fill said gap, unloading an additional shell into his foot. With further audacity, he says scientists should be "embarrassed" (something he repeats every few pages) to be wasting time and money trying to answer these questions because there is a gap there and God has filled it. Scientists should "hang up their boots."

When speaking of water, he goes on to say that science can find no reason for certain properties of water - therefore scientists should stop looking. God made water *just so*. Why would you want to look for the answers to these questions when he has the answer, and the answer is God? Please don't fill that gap with science, he seems to imply.

This review probably sounds like a review from an angry atheist, but mostly it is a review from a place of frustration with the assertions this author asks me to accept. "It is impossible to live as an intellectually fulfilled atheist," he says, which seems to me to completely misunderstand the curiosity that drives many of the most aspirational scientists. They are asking questions that are often incredibly difficult to nigh impossible to answer - where di the universe come from? How does the universe work at a fundamental level? How began life?

And in the pursuit of those answers, they have found many answers -- but not THE answers. But in science, the questions and what you discover along the way is fulfilling. The journey is fulfilling. I think, if you asked many scientists, you'd find that the idea of having all the answers would be the opposite of intellectually fulfilling, because what frontiers would be left to discovery?

And therein lies the crux; Eric Metaxas suffers a dire lack of empathy for different points of view, if his style of writing is any indicator. "The only way to be fulfilled," the pages seem to indicate "is to know all the answers." And anyone who wants to keep looking for more answers? Well, repeatedly, page after page, he says in explicit language, those people *Should* feel embarrassed. In those very words he makes that statement.

Telling scientists they should feel embarrassed repeatedly isn't the only bit of language that seems to lack a certain kind of humanity. He uses turns of phrase one might call Trumpian, honestly, and repeatedly. "No one was thinking of these things." "No one was asking these questions." "Who would have thought Jupiter was important to Earth?"

Many people have asked those questions, and they have for decades. The answers you give in this book, citing repeated studies affirming consensus, are an indicator that many people have been thinking of these questions, and providing answers.

So why give this book 2 stars, despite my problems with so many points in the book? Because I was genuinely entertained at times. Because despite my absolute disagreement with the strong conclusions Metaxas makes in the book, I appreciate the citations he brings to bear. Despite the out of context quotes (even going so far as to pull out of context from A Brief History of Time, as so many hundreds before him have), I appreciate the breadth of research he brought to the book.

But that is also why it is so disappointing. Despite citing writings across hundreds or thousands of years, he comes to the conclusion that now, today, we have come to the end of science. That now, today, we have proven abiogenesis impossible, and we cannot understand water, and the universe is inscrutable in its perfection. And because we can never know these answers, these answers are God.

And fifty years from now, or one hundred years from now, or five hundred years from now, this book, as so many others that have come before it, will likely be forgotten on a list of "God of the Gaps" examples that tried to stake a permanent spot for God to live in those questions Science hasn't answered yet.

And alongside that forgotten book, some new author will be fitting God into new questions science hasn't answered yet, because that is just how this works apparently.

18 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Science reinforces Biblical accuracy

Ancient Greeks Pythagoras (500BC) and Aristotle (400 BC) believed in a spherical planet many centuries before the flat-earth society finally had to concede that the earth is indeed round. Likewise, in our 21st century, the notion of God’s existence is rather unpopular in social media circles. Unfortunately, it appears that scientific evidence and a best-selling author of Greek heritage, Eric Metaxas, are beginning to shift the paradigm of today’s pop culture atheistic philosophy. In Eric’s latest book “Is Atheism Dead?”, he challenges the reader in a to grapple with evidence, and then decide for themselves: are the scientific facts making atheism illogical? The book made me realize that it is possible to whole-heartedly embrace both science and faith, because after all, even former atheists at the end of their days concluded that it had to be a Creator who initiated the Big Bang and intricately designed life and our complex amazing universe. If nothing else, you are sure to be entertained by Eric’s wit and thought-provoking ideas while listening to him narrate “Is Atheism Dead?”.

15 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Great Book!

I recommend this book. I love how Eric discussed how incredible God’s creation is, and my heart grieved over the evil that man in his denial of God can do such atrocities. I will buy the hard copy as a great reference book. As always Eric is a master writer and it shows. Stan Brown

10 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Glenn K

Incredible book. What a gift to a struggling physician trying to reconcile science and the Bible. Recommend without reservation.

6 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Biased and flawed

I was given the book by a friend and opted to listen to it. Narration was good so I found it easy to listen to at 2x speed. As a non-religious person who loves science, though, I found the book to be divisive and dismissive. Creation has zero explanatory power for basic things like the fossil record and the existence of Neanderthals that interbred with humans. The Bible existed for 2000 years which is but a drop in time, so where was this God for all the time before it? Even if an all-powerful creator designed this Universe, where did this creator come from? Just popped into existence? The Big Bang theory just says we don’t know what was present before and stops there. I can live with that.

Also, I guess I’m an atheist, but don’t think about it much. I love my life, I love learning, I love other people and it seemed at times the author was trying to speak wrongly about me. I don’t really ask why, but it does not bother me. I guess that if humans had evolved to hate others and kill each other randomly, or to hate their lives, the human race would not get far.

There was, at times, what I thought was a lot of we versus they fear-mongering - like comparing atheists to Hitler - who was, of course, voted into power by a hugely Christian nation. Religious and non-religious leaders and nations have done horrible things through history by appealing to tribalism. This book came across to me as a dishonest pseudo-scientific book that was promoting divisiveness between Christians and non-Christians.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Is Time magazine dead?

After all, time on this Earth is finite.

Thank you, Eric, for your passionate and rational discussion.

"The heavens declare the glory of God, and the sky above proclaims His handiwork." -Psalm 19:1

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

I loved this book.

This book represents a three-part dismantlement of the "atheist" philosophy. I was already very interested in the scientific arguments for design but I learned more about Biblical archeology than I thought was even possible! I think the third part is my favorite though, Metaxas is skilled at condensing big thoughts into poetry. Would definitely recommend this book.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

This book finished off the last of my faith

This book finished off the last vestiges of the faith I so desperately wanted to cling to.

The confidence and eloquence with which Metaxas writes gave me so much optimism that this book would live up to the bold claims in the description. However If Eric took even ten minutes to listen to some of atheists like Richard Dawkins explain the scientific arguments, he would realize that by asserting that the scientific belief of atheists is that cells randomly emerged from the primordial soup, he misunderstands himself into the greatest example of a strawman argument that I think I've ever encountered. No biologist believes we randomly went from soup to cells, and for at least a hundred years that hasn't been a serious possibilty. Natural selection, including the development of cells, is the complete opposite of random. Please read "the God Delusion" for a clear expansion of this concept. If you can't stomach the abrasive approach of Dawkins I completely understand that, you can find the same material in almost any course on biology or evolution. The Great courses are full of great titles but I especially loved "the origin and evolution of earth" by Robert Hazen. There is also an audiobook by the same author covering similar material called "the story of Earth". There is definitely a block of unknown between how we get from amino acids to a self replicator, but the jump is nowhere near the magnitude of unlikely that would make for a compelling book about how modern science proves there's a creator by exposing the extremely unlikely odds.

I gave the book two stars because the prose really is quite elegant, and many of the scientific explanations were accurate and well articulated. However I was torn because the parts that were wrong were the critical points, which undermines the main message of the book.

The author's reputation and the bold claims in the description of the book made me so hopeful that this book could rescue my dying faith. Unfortunately, the content has left me depressed and resigned that science is on the side of atheism.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Appendices of some antediluvian monster... __;o)__

I don't know what to think of this phrase on page 166. Either Eric needs to fire his useless proofreader, or this is some sort of contest to see who notices first. If it's the latter, where do I claim my prize? __;o)___ Amazing book by the way!

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • GW
  • 11-26-21

Amazing!

There were so many facets of belief & unbelief explored with information that was new to me. It is worth a read by anyone whether your faith is in scientific materialism, Mohammed, or the God of the Bible.

2 people found this helpful

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Craig P Eyles
  • Craig P Eyles
  • 04-15-22

awe inspiring

scores critical hit after critical hit on the dullism of atheistic dogma and the self serving buffoons enslaved by it.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Sunil Raheja
  • Sunil Raheja
  • 04-09-22

Powerful and brilliantly explained

Our secular and atheistic western culture has drip fed us the lie for more than a hundred years that we live in a world of meaningless. Metaxas patiently and humorously challenges this through evidence from science, archaeology and the lives of atheists.
This book needs to be shouted from the rooftops - the Emperor of atheism has no clothes!

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Courtney Daniel
  • Courtney Daniel
  • 02-05-22

Captivating and informative!

Thank you Eric and the team!
The level of detail in this book is inspired and really gives us an insight into a great but flawed human.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for RichardDM
  • RichardDM
  • 01-20-22

Superb

This is a very important contribution and collection of all the evidence for any serious thinking person. Marvellous.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for N E Body
  • N E Body
  • 06-07-22

essential reading

well done Eric! what is it with you Greeks? so talented yet so sexy.

we could go off you. :)

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Kevin
  • Kevin
  • 03-23-22

Another Embarrassing Apologist

I consider myself fairly open-minded on most subjects (as much as one can be), so as a nonbeliever in gods, I like to read books like this in case I am missing something.

Clearly, I am not.

This author pulls assertions from thin air, makes up 'facts' and is hopelessly confused or he is lying.
I am not the first person to point this out, but ATHEISM IS NOT A WORLD VIEW. Nor is atheism a belief that god(s) don't exist. Atheists are just not convinced of the existence of a god, due to lack of evidence.

This book offers nothing new: straw man arguments and arguments from personal incredulity. "I can't explain how the universe began or how life started; therefore god did it"

He also doesn't seem to understand that science (a method) and scientists (people) are two different things.
"Science (scientists) can't explain blah blah blah"
Yes, we know that the scientific method can't explain everything, THAT'S WHY WE ARE STILL CONDUCTING SCIENTIFIC EXPERIMENTS AND INQUIRIES.

Here are some highlights:
The author gives a scathing critique of Christopher Hitchens' God Is Not Great, then a few minutes later admits he didn't read it.

He claims that almost all scientists from the 16th to the 19th century were Christians (can he read the minds of dead people?) then goes on to say that over the same time period the church had ultimate authority and that claiming to be a nonbeliever could get yourself ostracised, tortured or murdered. It is no wonder that intellectuals kept their thoughts private.

He claims that atheists have no meaning in their lives or are nihilists. I would argue the opposite; if this is the only chance I get and the only life I'm ever going to have, then I am going to give it my best shot and squeeze meaning out of every day.

And then this:
Nazis killed millions of people, were evil and were atheists (they weren't; most of Germany was Catholic, including Hitler and Pope Pius XII, if not a supporter was reluctant to condemn the Nazi regime)
Therefore being an atheist is the same as being a Nazi. I wish this was a sick joke, but that is what he states.

Utter drivel

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Ken
  • Ken
  • 10-28-21

My eyes rolled so hard my brain hurt

oh lordy,where to begin. firstly just because the universe seems unlikely, does not prove the existence of the Christian god any more than it proves universe creating fairies. But the author knows that. He wastes no time in excusing away as 'not in the scope of this book' any actual evidence for Christianity, but chooses to play instead in the safe space of unfalsifiability where he can make use of all the gaps of scientific knowledge to crowbar in the possibility of a deity.
Secondly, these claims of archeological evidence for the Bible's historical accuracy will come as a huge surprise to the archaeological community. one thing I learner long ago, is don't take a Christians word on issues such as these.
seriously, I get it.if you're a Christian, and you have an emotional need to believe in God, as this author almost immediately reveals, you will believe what ever you need to believe; and because this book tells you exactly what you want to hear you will lap it up without question. But question you should. There is nothing new here. just the usual lies, half truths and careful misrepresentations Christians have used for years to cling to their faith.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Shaz Ginns
  • Shaz Ginns
  • 10-28-21

Setting the table for a revival of truth in scientific endeavour

Finally a book that pulls no punches and lays out the facts truthfully and clearly. We have been sold a false reality by those we had trusted implicitly with the education of our children. Mr Metaxas has revealed that the Emperor truly has no clothes and if we had only looked beyond our secular ‘Betters’ we could have uncovered this ourselves. This book needs to be in school curriculums. It needs to be studied and used as a conduit to the work of those whose work he has uncovered as truly worthy of the term scholarly. This will hopefully help turn the page to a new better and honest understanding of science, the world and our existence in this wonderful creation.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for David Graieg
  • David Graieg
  • 11-04-21

The section on archeology came alive

Well read (although there were a couple of words I am used to a different pronunciation). A good up to date discussion of the scientific findings. I wasn't sure if the section on archeology was, but I think Metaxas made it very engaging. At times I think Metaxas overstates the case (for instance, on the section on textual criticism); nevertheless, I think it is a well researched and enjoyable listen. Recommended =)

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Alison Mettam
  • Alison Mettam
  • 10-30-21

Eric Metaxas best by far

As a YEC I wasn’t going to get the audio as I thought Eric would blab on about the Big Bang, which he did but he managed to awe me on so much. The archeological story’s really managed to capture the adventures. This I think is by far the best of Eric Metaxas’s books.