• Just and Unjust Wars

  • A Moral Argument With Historical Illustrations
  • By: Michael Walzer
  • Narrated by: Gregory St. John
  • Length: 14 hrs and 8 mins
  • 4.2 out of 5 stars (90 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

From the Athenian attack on Melos to the My Lai Massacre, from the wars in the Balkans through the first war in Iraq, Michael Walzer examines the moral issues surrounding military theory, war crimes, and the spoils of war. He studies a variety of conflicts over the course of history, as well as the testimony of those who have been most directly involved - participants, decision makers, and victims. In his introduction to this new edition, Walzer specifically addresses the moral issues surrounding the war in and occupation of Iraq, reminding us once again that "the argument about war and justice is still a political and moral necessity."

©1977 Basic Books (P)2014 Audible Inc.
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: History

What listeners say about Just and Unjust Wars

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    1 out of 5 stars
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Horrible read, no story, horrible book...

Walzer uses too many fillers and redundant words to make the book bigger. He constantly repeats his point and all of his talking points are common sense. He uses vocabulary to sound smart when it was unnecessary. Horrible book, horrible read, don’t waste your money!

2 people found this helpful

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All's Fair in Love and War?

This book is an incredibly dense treatise and analysis on the moral hardlines and ambiguities encountered in the midst of war. As a casual audio listen, it's probably a bit much to take in. But taken one chapter at a time and allowing each one to process, this book reveals itself to be of considerable value to historians, philosophers, military enthusiasts, and pretty much anyone for whom this topic weighs heavily. The trick, I think, is to get into the hands of world leaders and military commanders for consideration where it matters most.

3 people found this helpful

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One long ramble

I think this might be normal for philosophy books but,. The book just felt like one long ramble. It was very difficult to even tell where one idea ended and the next one began. additionally I didn't find anything particularly profound about his ideas. he really didn't offer any questions that I hadn't already considered myself.

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Eye opening

This book was masterfully put together. As a military professional, it has opened my eyes and has a lasting impact in my decision cycle. The legalities of war and the conduct of war told from an outside view that provides an in depth perspective on cause and effect of leader actions.

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Not bad

Hard to listen to this narrator's pretentious intonation. Also, i would have liked the end to have a list of bulletized takeaways; Summary conclusions, generalities, and principles to guide decision makers in the future.