• Summary

  • The Latter-day Saint Women podcast shares the legacy of women of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Get to know the faithful women who shaped our past, and hear from inspiring women of faith today as they address gospel topics.
    © 2022 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Episodes
  • Feb 26 2020
    Virginia H. Pearce gave her powerful talk “Prayer: A Small and Simple Thing” at BYU Women’s Conference in April 2018. Join hosts Shalyn Back and Katie Perez as they discuss how this discourse remains relevant today along with special guest Emily Utt of the Church History Department. Full Discourse https://www.churchhistorianspress.org/at-the-pulpit/part-4/chapter-50 From childhood, Virginia Hinckley Pearce (b. 1945) found that her parents wove prayer and church service into the fabric of their everyday lives. She remembers that when she or one of her siblings was particularly worried over a situation, her father, Gordon B. Hinckley, would say, “Just say your prayers and go to bed. Get up in the morning; it’ll be clearer.” Pearce has applied that good advice; her own restatement of it is, “Just say your prayers, go to bed, and when you get up in the morning, go back to work.” Gathering for family prayer, going to church, and working on church assignments felt like a natural part of her family life, not something on a list she had to complete. She saw that church work for her mother, Marjorie Pay Hinckley, was “part of who she was,” and that she always seemed energized by doing that work, not pressured or annoyed.
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  • Mar 4 2020
    “Not enough people understand … that questions are good. … They can bring light and understanding.” Julie Willis shared this and other insights in her landmark speech at BYU Idaho in July 2014. Join hosts Shalyn Back and Katie Perez along with special guest Kate Holbrook, PhD as they discuss how to ask questions and seek answers. Full Discourse https://www.churchhistorianspress.org/at-the-pulpit/bonus-chapters/bonus-7 In the same talk Julie also shared, "This beautiful picture of Mt. Moran in the Tetons, photographed by my brother John, reflects a fundamental question that helped shape my academic studies. The actual question is immaterial; what’s important is that I left the serenity of the landscape and asked a question. What question would you ask about this scene? It likely depends on your background and interests. An outdoor enthusiast may ask about climbing routes, a botanist may wonder about the effects of glaciation on conifers, an artist might want to know how to best capture the reflections in the lake, and a geologist may ask about the tectonic forces that built the mountains. The variety and depth of questions that can be asked about a simple mountain scene can be as numerous as the people who view it. The ability and desire to ask questions and search for answers is a uniquely human attribute that is vital to the scientific, artistic, and religious advancements of humanity. We start asking questions at a very young age, as any parent of a precocious three-year-old knows. This suggests that we bring a questioning spirit with us to earth, and that learning by asking and seeking is one reason that our Heavenly Parents have given us the gift of mortal life."
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  • Mar 11 2020
    Why do bad things happen to good people? Why does God allow suffering when he has all power? Francine Bennion explored these topics in her groundbreaking discourse in March 1986. Join hosts Shalyn Back and Katie Perez along with special guest Kate Holbrook, PhD as they explore how gaining an understanding of our theology can help make sense of suffering. Full discourse https://www.churchhistorianspress.org/at-the-pulpit/part-4/chapter-43 “What I’m passionate about,” said Francine Russell Bennion (b. 1935), “is human existence, and the relationships between people and God, and what works and what doesn’t.” In an interview, Bennion explained that when she taught a Relief Society or Gospel Doctrine lesson she never wanted to brush off reality and speak only of ideals. Instead, she tried to present fresh, useful, and reality-affirming perspectives that would lift and enhance human relationships.
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    Less than 1 minute

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Wonderful and inspiring

her guests are very knowledgeable, and it's not only a wonderful faith building tool, but learning some of the backstories are very inspiring.