1 title per month from Audible’s entire catalog of best sellers, and new releases.
Access a growing selection of included Audible Originals, audiobooks and podcasts.
You will get an email reminder before your trial ends.
Your Premium Plus plan is $14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $18.89

Buy for $18.89

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

From social psychologist Dr. Devon Price, a conversational, stirring call to “a better, more human way to live” (Cal Newport, New York Times best-selling author) that examines the “laziness lie” - which falsely tells us we are not working or learning hard enough.

Extra-curricular activities. Honors classes. 60-hour work weeks. Side hustles.

Like many Americans, Dr. Devon Price believed that productivity was the best way to measure self-worth. Price was an overachiever from the start, graduating from both college and graduate school early, but that success came at a cost. After Price was diagnosed with a severe case of anemia and heart complications from overexertion, they were forced to examine the darker side of all this productivity.

Laziness Does Not Exist explores the psychological underpinnings of the “laziness lie,” including its origins from the Puritans and how it has continued to proliferate as digital work tools have blurred the boundaries between work and life. Using in-depth research, Price explains that people today do far more work than nearly any other humans in history, yet most of us often still feel we are not doing enough.

Filled with practical and accessible advice for overcoming society’s pressure to do more, and featuring interviews with researchers, consultants, and experiences from real people drowning in too much work, Laziness Does Not Exist “is the book we all need right now” (Caroline Dooner, author of The F*ck It Diet).

©2021 Devon Price. All rights reserved. (P)2021 Simon & Schuster, Inc. All rights reserved.

What listeners say about Laziness Does Not Exist

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    307
  • 4 Stars
    62
  • 3 Stars
    22
  • 2 Stars
    13
  • 1 Stars
    12
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    269
  • 4 Stars
    57
  • 3 Stars
    17
  • 2 Stars
    6
  • 1 Stars
    5
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    249
  • 4 Stars
    53
  • 3 Stars
    23
  • 2 Stars
    14
  • 1 Stars
    9

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

One of the Most Important Books I've Ever Read

I'm a mental health professional and love a good personal development book, but this...this book shifted my perspective in ways I'm not sure I'll be able to adequately articulate for quite a while. Dr. Price finally gives a name to the pressures (both external and internal) that keep us over-worked, constantly plugged in, endlessly competing, exhausted, and perpetually believing that we SHOULD be doing even more. "The laziness lie" is a collection of beliefs we've internalized about the value of activity and achievement and the shame of inactivity and idleness. Price's warm, compassionate, often humorous analysis of our busy-centric culture offers a completely new, refreshing paradigm for understanding our impulses to be "lazy."

While I've long understood the arguments for "self-care" and "boundary-setting,", I've struggled mightily with overcoming my addiction to activities that make me feel purposeful, important, and needed and my self-righteous impulses to fill every second free time with "virtuous," self- improving activities. This book delivers the jaw-dropping, mind-boggling message that non-stop efforts to "self-improve" or even to take on "world-saving" activities can actually make us more judgmental, competitive, and disconnected.

Experimenting with unlearning the "laziness lie" has had a dramatic impact on how I see myself and how I see others. If this book gets the attention it deserves, its message and the conversations it would start would radically change our world for the better.

16 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

An Absolute Waste of Time. Not practical at all.

Honestly...this book is useless. The actual meat and useful content of examining why people are lazy, what makes people lazy, what to do about it...eh it's a few pages. That was what this book was sold as, it's literally the header here on Audible, practical and accessible advice. Instead it felt like story time.

The rest of the book is just rambling about how busy people are and endless personal stories and stories about friends who are all really busy, all while severely under-edited, throwing in soo much about all the very specific different types of activism all the subjects' are involved in, just so much useless filler that serves absolutely no purpose. Really just seems to be the author kind of activism credentialing themselves like "I have this friend who does this, and this, and this" and another who does "this and this and this" with "this specific organization *insert name drop* and also this other famous origination" and yea, they got burned out.

So much of the stuff that is supposedly practical and useful is really just stuff that sounds good but is absolutely moronically simple. Like don't work 80 hours per week every week...woah, why didn't I think of that! All the other self-help tips were completely as useless and just painful to listen to. It almost felt insulting going through this book telling me really basic stuff about how to live life.

15 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Insightful piece debunking toxic productivity

I found this to be a well-researched & thought-provoking book examining the origin of laziness & how this myth has permeated much of society. The lack of a strong labor/left movement in the US post WW2 has enabled this laziness myth to perpetuate & effect all aspects of life in American society, from our work lives to our personal & relationship lives.

The author provides practical steps to overcome this lie & to live more fulfilling & balanced lives. Overall, I recommend this book if you struggle with feeling like you’re always unproductive & aren’t “doing enough” in your everyday life.

7 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Probably needed to hear this years ago.

I've been pushing myself too hard for decades and have started to loath my job. I picked this up after hearing the author talk about this subject on The Mental Illness Happy Hour. Once I started, I couldn't help but cringe as it laid out what I've been doing to myself for too long. This gives insight, but will not solve your problems... Only you can do that.

The subject matter was quite interesting, but the delivery was a tad dry. Overall, I'd suggest this if you're starting to lose interest in things that once gave you pride and joy. That might just be the burnout from trying to live the laziness lie.

6 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

I can't with the narration

Not a lot of facts presented and read in an overly emotional way that I don't really enjoy for nonfiction presentation. I can't imagine sitting through seven hours of this.

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

It's not just our jobs

Our whole way of life is twisted around to serve our masters. We in America and her hegemonic sphere of influence are slaves, owned by capital, and they have indoctrinated us with a pernicious lie: that we are lazy.

This book is a full throated argument that laziness is never the reality. That doing less is higher quality, and the quality is for the self, regardless of whether anything is produced. You need this book. This is the good news you need to hear.

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

loved it

Excellent book. Exactly what I needed to hear, though I didn't know it. I always beat myself up for being lazy and pushed myself to always be working, then wondered why I got burned out so often. This book really hit home for me, and now I'm going to "work" on being lazy without guilt!

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

A reasonable core message, lots of irrelevant examples

The core message of this book is that we should not measure our worth by our productivity. We should replace this with unconventional compassion for ourselves. The rest of the book develops the argument as to why. I liked (and largely agree with) that core piece. However, most of the authors examples and experiences were so extreme as to be completely irrelevant to most people’s lives (one person who let a gall bladder get necrotic from overwork, the author herself who allowed herself to run a fever for a full year). Most of the given examples would not fit into most people’s idea of what is reasonable - it’s full of people who have no idea how to set boundaries or stand up for themselves and seem not to value themselves very much. It’s also full of far left-leaning weirdos (the authors word for herself, not mine). Virtually all the examples given were centered around leftist activism, climate change, or COVID, and this was a major unnecessary weakness of the book which often made it challenging to relate to for someone who does not share the authors politics.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

I'll be re-reading this one yearly

It's difficult to face our own biases, but that difficulty is absolutely worth it in this case.

I'll be buying myself a physical copy for reference and for some of the self-reflection pieces. I'll also be buying a handful of extra copies to share.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
  • jd
  • 11-02-21

Opposite.

This is the worst book I’ve ever read. Literally everything in it is false and based on assertion. It sounds like a dramatic complaining high school girl wrote enough “ i’m pretty good at b.s.ing” essays on the same topic to be long enough to be considered a “book”, but nothing in this scholarly. There’s a little research on where the word lazy started getting used, but other than that nothing about this book is informative anyway.

1 person found this helpful

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 06-14-21

revolutionary from start to end

This book was life changing. It's helped me really understand what parts of my life I keep living for other people. the intersectional perspective helps me so much, especially as a low energy person who struggles with activism burnout. Wish all my loved ones had read/listened to the contents of this book.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 06-24-22

insightful, thought provoking and validating!

much more validating than a self-help book! easy to follow and understand, love it

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Ellin A
  • Ellin A
  • 04-04-22

Another great analysis from Dr. Devon Price

I personally love Dr. Price's work and this is another great piece. It makes you consider the origins of the word "lazy" and what it serves to suggest. I especially love the well-rounded analysis from the perspective of gender, race, neurodiversity, disability and capitalism.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Wadeisor R.
  • Wadeisor R.
  • 02-15-22

Stellar!

Loved this. Such required reading. 10/10 would recommend to anyone in their process of healing and learning about rest and care. The author carefully contextualised the history of laziness and their own anecdotes helped solidify what they were speaking to.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for I. Braich
  • I. Braich
  • 01-31-22

Brilliant

It's amazing and agree with it fully. deep understanding . well done and thank you

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Amazon Customer
  • Amazon Customer
  • 12-02-21

Life changing

What a great book. Completely changed my outlook. Absolutely love the way it’s read too. Definitely will be recommending! If you’re in a managerial role it’s a must.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for GC
  • GC
  • 10-26-21

healing, comforting and revolutionary

People should read this!
We need rest and play to keep our humanity intact. I would have loved more on disability and how the carceral system fits into this

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Leila O'Connor
  • Leila O'Connor
  • 04-20-21

Inspiring and helpful

I had a hard time getting used to the reading (it came across as overearnest to me) but the content is worth persevering for. Inspiring and helpful in so much of my life.

2 people found this helpful