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Publisher's Summary

The New York Times best seller by the acclaimed, best-selling author of Start With Why and Together Is Better. Now with an expanded chapter and appendix on leading millennials, based on Simon Sinek's viral video "Millenials in the Workplace" (150+ million views).

Imagine a world where almost everyone wakes up inspired to go to work, feels trusted and valued during the day, then returns home feeling fulfilled. This is not a crazy, idealized notion. Today, in many successful organizations, great leaders create environments in which people naturally work together to do remarkable things.

In his work with organizations around the world, Simon Sinek noticed that some teams trust each other so deeply that they would literally put their lives on the line for each other. Other teams, no matter what incentives are offered, are doomed to infighting, fragmentation, and failure. Why?

The answer became clear during a conversation with a Marine Corps general. "Officers eat last," he said. Sinek watched as the most junior Marines ate first while the most senior Marines took their place at the back of the line. What's symbolic in the chow hall is deadly serious on the battlefield: Great leaders sacrifice their own comfort - even their own survival - for the good of those in their care.

Too many workplaces are driven by cynicism, paranoia, and self-interest. But the best ones foster trust and cooperation because their leaders build what Sinek calls a "Circle of Safety" that separates the security inside the team from the challenges outside.

Sinek illustrates his ideas with fascinating true stories that range from the military to big business, from government to investment banking.

©2014 Simon Sinek (P)2020 Penguin Audio

What listeners say about Leaders Eat Last

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Very Disappointed

I struggled to finish listening. It consisted mainly of stories about executives and their doings. Very little in the way of "front line" leaders. The last few hours was belittling millennials with strong implications of "the good times are over" beliefs.

This is the second book I've listened to by the author and was just as disappointed as the first "Find Your Why".

I recommend sticking with the classic "How to Win Friends and Influence People". That book is a Porsche, where as "Leaders Eat Last" is a bicycle with a flat tire.

27 people found this helpful

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Little bit myopic and lots of cognitive dissonance

Author pushes his justification of culture on single events in history that just simply are non-sensible.

“America lost its work culture when Regan laid off all air traffic controllers”. There is no deeper thought or look into the reason for lay-offs.... there are about 20 of these examples.

13 people found this helpful

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Try Another Read!

I went into this book with high expectations but felt like it failed to deliver a solid case! Most of the book talked about Neurotransmitters such as dopamine, serotonin, and oxytocin and never really established why having that knowledge is so important other than to fill in over half the book!
I'm all for trying new reads, especially on Leadership but this one was disappointing

6 people found this helpful

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Will definitely read again!

absolutely fantastic! Simon sinek once again has not disappointed and will be back to read more from him

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Should be a required read for Supervisors

I absolutely love it! I love the history, the anthropology and psychology. I love the advice in the appendix. I highly recommend this book.

2 people found this helpful

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What an outstanding book!

I loved this book, this performance and I cannot read and listen to enough of Sinek's books and info, please listen and suggest to someone else, the revision on Millennials was also very helpful and informative for a person such as myself in a guest-services leadership role, Thank You Simon!!

2 people found this helpful

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A true analysis of what a leader is


The idea of leaders eating last may sound like a "softie" attitude to life and love.. Sinek shows that it's nothing of the sort. His examples of the successful engagement of this ethos are drawn from fields as tough as the US Marines and the dog-eat-dog world Corporate America. Leaders eating last works, Sinek insists, because human beings are built to function best in that sort of environment.
I'm a physician and admittedly , the book has a lot of oversimplification of the neurophysiology behind human feelings. However, it's fairly accurate as far as it goes. The author uses these principles as the basis of his explanation of how good leadership works.
A few points I really enjoyed:
His explanation for the current breakdown of relations between the Republicans and Democrats in congress. It's hard to believe that just 20 years ago (or less), most members of congress from both sides of the aisle used to socialise together. Their kids were in the same schools in DC.

His analysis of the history of news broadcasting in the United States although brief, is incredibly insightful. It's been described in detail in other tomes, but Sinek really does it justice here.

He also gives what I believe is a balanced view on Millennials & Generation Z's. He explains what they need to do to overcome the challenges that frequently trip them up. A lot of what he describes may be familiar to many of the older generation. But he also makes it clear that the problem isn't just with the Millennials. The older generation need to do some work here too.

An easy read and very insightful in my view.

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Great overview, maybe a bit long in the tooth.

Loved the complete overview style of the book. The only issue I ran into was the dopamine heavy final act, a bit long in the tooth but helpful.

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Great read for any one planning to advance

This is a great read for anyone playing on advancing in their career. It really opens your eyes to how others think rather than seeing things through the filter of your own life.

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Great book even for obesity

This is such a great book and so practical. If corporations used these theories, it could solve so many problems around the world. As a fitness enthusiast, I recommended this book to all in those in my diet group. The hormones discussed in the book, serotonin, oxytocin, dopamine and etc. play such a vital role in nutrition. The book made me realize that if I could get the group to understand WHY they crave processed foods and the positive chemical reactions that will happen if you simply employ a little discipline, they would stick to their eating plans much better.

1 person found this helpful