• Lost Heirs of the Medieval Crown

  • The Kings and Queens Who Never Were
  • By: J.F. Andrews
  • Narrated by: Roger Clark
  • Length: 7 hrs and 54 mins
  • 4.8 out of 5 stars (6 ratings)

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Lost Heirs of the Medieval Crown

By: J.F. Andrews
Narrated by: Roger Clark
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Publisher's Summary

When William the Conqueror died in 1087, he left the throne of England to William Rufus . . . his second son. The result was an immediate war as Rufus's elder brother Robert fought to gain the crown he saw as rightfully his; this conflict marked the start of 400 years of bloody disputes as the English monarchy's line of hereditary succession was bent, twisted, and finally broken when the last Plantagenet king, Richard III, fell at Bosworth in 1485.

The Anglo-Norman and Plantagenet dynasties were renowned for their internecine strife, and in Lost Heirs we will unearth the hidden stories of fratricidal brothers, usurping cousins, and murderous uncles; the many kings-and the occasional queen-who should have been but never were. History is written by the winners, but every game of thrones has its losers too, and their fascinating stories bring richness and depth to what is a colorful period of history. King John would not have gained the crown had he not murdered his young nephew, who was in line to become England's first King Arthur; Henry V would never have been at Agincourt had his father not seized the throne by usurping and killing his cousin; and as the rival houses of York and Lancaster fought bloodily over the crown during the Wars of the Roses, life suddenly became very dangerous indeed for a young boy named Edmund.

©2019 J F Andrews (P)2022 Tantor

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Filling in holes 🕳

This book does a better job with objectivity than most of the histories I've read as well as explaining the motivation of some of the peripheral characters in the biographies I've read. Though the author was more kind to the last Plantagenet King than I would have been it is an excellent read 📚 👍.

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  • M. G. Crates
  • 07-26-22

A good book spoiled by strange pronunciation.

If you're going to get someone to read a book full of English and French place names that aren't pronounced like they look, please find someone who can do this! Why Sal-is-bury, War-wick etc. and why does Mr Clark think "prodigal" is pronounced as "pro-dye-jal"?