• Lost and Found

  • Helping Behaviorally Challenging Students (and, While You're at It, All the Others)
  • By: Ross W. Greene
  • Narrated by: Edward Bauer
  • Length: 6 hrs and 7 mins
  • 4.6 out of 5 stars (56 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Implement a more constructive approach to difficult students 

Lost and Found is a follow-up to Dr. Ross Greene's landmark works, The Explosive Child and Lost at School, providing educators with highly practical, explicit guidance on implementing his Collaborative & Proactive Solutions (CPS) Problem Solving model with behaviorally-challenging students. While the first two books described Dr. Greene's positive, constructive approach and described implementation on a macro level, this useful guide provides the details of hands-on CPS implementation by those who interact with these children every day. Listeners will learn how to incorporate students' input in understanding the factors making it difficult for them to meet expectations and in generating mutually satisfactory solutions. Specific strategies, sample dialogues, and time-tested advice help educators implement these techniques immediately. 

The groundbreaking CPS approach has been a revelation for parents and educators of behaviorally-challenging children. This book gives educators the concrete guidance they need to immediately begin working more effectively with these students.

©2016 Ross W. Greene, PhD (P)2019 Tantor

What listeners say about Lost and Found

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lot of parallels to restorative justice

more technical than Lost at School and more for teachers and administrators but as a concerned parent trying to work with a "Plan A" school, I still got a lot out of this book. Wish this was required reading to be a school administrator.

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Infomercial

In an oddly desperate effort to portray good practice as a grand theory, Greene subverts important tools available for helping children with special needs. His straw man arguments involve purposely confusing a problematic status quo in American schools with the best effects of well established tools (e.g., the many demonstrably effective techniques emerging from behavioral theory). To be clear, Greene's purportedly magic steps are completely compatible with behavioral techniques; in fact, those steps are simply part of good practice. Greene is correct to point out that good practice is not frequently occurring in American schools. Greene is absurd in suggesting that these elements of good practice are, by themselves, sufficient to address the needs of American school children. Toward the end of the 18th century and stretching into the early 19th century, Pinel and others observed awful conditions in institutions for persons with mental illness and proposed "moral treatment" -- practices that respect the dignity of the persons with mental illness. The leaders initially imagined that moral treatment was necessary and sufficient for curing mental illness, but soon discovered that treatment of mental illness required more than these elements of good practice -- which we ultimately now consider necessary but not sufficient. In some ways, Greene is channeling Pinel, but frankly Greene knows better in the 21st century. This book well describes some necessary features of working effectively with children, but Greene adopts infomercial logic and tactics in puffing up his product.

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Great book

I really enjoyed this book and looking forward to using the ALSUP with some of our students when we return to school. Great strategies !

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Every human needs the Dr Greene books!

This is probably my 5 or 6th Dr. Greene book and I am so very happy I have found them all. I have passed these onto school staff and the CPS model has helped my Son who has many challenges feel heard and grow in so many ways. I am forever indebted to this model and know this will be a lifelong journey for us using this as a way to speak person to person with just about anyone.

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Solid methodology

Change is most effective when you do it with the person not to the person. This book understands that.