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Publisher's Summary

Two TV newscasters find common ground in their pursuit of the story. But their methods for coping with horrific news collide during a shooting at Navy Pier.

Diamond Crandall anchors his own cable news show The Diamond Report and is resented by some for his age and lack of experience. But he’s proven himself as a solid journalist, and most of his colleagues respect him. When Hope Colson shows up to vie for a seat next to him as co-host, he balks, until he sees her in action.

The producer of his show, Jane only cares about ratings, not standards. When Jane admits she’s hiring Hope, not for her standards or talent, but because she’s Black, Diamond is taken aback and unsure if he should tell Hope or not. But one of Diamond’s colleagues - one who’s still resentful of Diamond’s ascent at the network -tells Hope that it is Diamond who wanted a Black woman hired for diversity’s sake. What had started as a promising professional and, perhaps, personal relationship deteriorates into the two of them barely speaking.

It doesn’t help that the rest of the Crandall family has fallen in love with Hope, and even Senator Nolan Crandall, gives Hope an exclusive interview, which rankles Diamond, especially since Hope has been giving him the cold shoulder treatment. When Hope panics during a shooting at Navy Pier in Chicago, Diamond advises her to get help. It’s only when Diamond sees a family collapse that he goes into his own form of PTSD.

They both reveal the past tragedies that refuse to heal since both have refused to talk about them. From Chicago to DC and the halls of Congress, the two journalists appear on the air together, but when the lights go off and they face each other, the truths long hidden will determine if the chemistry on the air translates to real life.

©2019 Patricia Camburn Zick (P)2020 Patricia Camburn Zick

What listeners say about Love on Air

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Cute Story

Cut throat business shows it self and issues of not being qualified, or because of race are dealt with. The different issues has Diamond upset, he has his own cable news station.He was just told that Hope was hired. to co anchor, unqualified, it was all for ratings. Mayhem with what friends were saying, seeing her on air, was something else. Always enjoyable of how love comes, and with this, some big issues. Enjoyable and good narration.
Given audio for my voluntary review

1 person found this helpful

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Where is the rest of it?

This book is okay. I was expecting some fire, some passion, a commitment. The book started out really well. I liked how both of these people had issues that they had to overcome. I appreciated how they eventually became friends. I kind of hated that they made Janine into the bad guy plus one does not call somebody up and say watch your back and don't do anything( a missed opportunity there). The narration was bad, so bad, at one point in the book I thought her MoMA was an Asian woman. Then for the life of me, I could not understand why the narrator had to make his MoMA sound like a sleazy hooker, did no one listen before they published this book? It hurt my ears to hear it and it diminished the character. I appreciated the closeness of the family. This book is, to me very mild and I was left asking at the end, Where is the rest of it? They were like really close friends to me, not soul mates whose lives are better together, not that it was not implied but I didn't buy it at the end.