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Madly, Deeply  By  cover art

Madly, Deeply

By: Alan Rickman,Emma Thompson - foreword,Rima Horton - afterword
Narrated by: Alfred Enoch,Bonnie Wright,Rima Horton,Steven Crossley
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Publisher's Summary

This audiobook includes narration from Bonnie Wright, Alfred Enoch, Steven Crossley, and Rima Horton.

Madly, Deeply is a rare invitation into the mind of Alan Rickman—one of the most magnetic, beloved performers of our time.

From his breakout role in Die Hard to his outstanding, multifaceted performances in the Harry Potter films, Galaxy Quest, Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves, and more, Alan Rickman cemented his legacy as a world-class actor. His air of dignity, his sonorous voice, and the knowing wit he brought to each role continue to captivate audiences today.

But Rickman’s ability to breathe life into projects wasn't confined to just his performances. As you'll find, Rickman's diaries detail the extraordinary and the ordinary, flitting between worldly and witty and gossipy, while remaining utterly candid throughout. He takes us inside his home, on trips with friends across the globe, and on the sets of films and plays ranging from Sense and Sensibility, to Noël Coward's Private Lives, to the final film he directed, A Little Chaos.

Running from 1993 to his death in 2016, the diaries provide singular insight into Rickman's public and private life. Reading them is like listening to Rickman chatting to a close companion. Meet Rickman the consummate professional actor, but also the friend, the traveler, the fan, the director, the enthusiast; in short, the man beyond the icon.

Madly, Deeply features a photo insert, a foreword by Emma Thompson, and an afterword by Rima Horton.

A Macmillan Audio production from Henry Holt and Company.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2022 Alan Rickman (P)2022 Macmillan Audio

What listeners say about Madly, Deeply

Average Customer Ratings
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  • Overall
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    5 out of 5 stars

If only Alan Rickman could have narrated

It took me awhile to appreciate Mr Rickman’s sparse, name-dropping diary entries but when I finished, I listened again from beginning to end and got much more out of his life story. A complex person who lived a full life - arrogant and vulnerable, demanding and generous, as hardworking as he was talented, and obviously loved by many friends. You can hear Rickman’s own deep, hypnotic voice with its unpredictable phrasing for a few minutes at the end of the audiobook. You might want to listen to it first.

7 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars

A better narrator

It was ok. The narrator kinda ruined it for me. They need someone the had a deeper voice like Alan did. In my opinion anyway

7 people found this helpful

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only a diary.... and a boring one at that.

I was expecting more from this not an actual listing of meet ups and boring lists

6 people found this helpful

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Boring Beyond Belief

This is not a diary. These are lazy jottings. Waste of time. Avoid. Why was this published?

4 people found this helpful

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Save your time and your money

I write this as a fan of Mr Rickman…this is a complete waste of your time and money. Think of this endeavor not as a diary, but as the audacious publication of someone’s schedule/log with only a few edifying comments thrown in with, what I assume, must have been a plan to revisit as a framework for a potential book. If you think you will gain insight into Mr Rickman or any of the myriad celebrities he references, forget it. Though there are laundry lists of famous people he interacts with (ex: Hugh Grant, Sting, Elton John, Mike Nichols, Emma Thompson, Julia Roberts , Duchess of Cambridge and on and on, that’s all you’ll get. A list. Not a word of description. Imagine in reference to his filming of Love Actually ( everyone’s favorite low brow film) there is not a word. There are very rare acerbic, sarcastic contemptuous comments that will confirm what you already felt you ‘ knew’ about him. It’s like listening to someone reading the phone book for 19 hours on the chance you recognize that a friend or two has changed their phone number. Fifty percent of the ‘book’ is ….pick up at 740, Heathrow 830, 915 Lufthansa to Berlin. Just like that. Over and over again. Nothing the slightest bit personal. This could not have been meant as a publication. The audacity of someone ( his wife ?) to make some money off a calendar is astounding and insulting to the man. Wish I had read the NYT review before ordering.

3 people found this helpful

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A great actor....

....but,, as a diarist, he's no Samuel Pepys. His inner thoughts and musings might have been better left unpublished.

3 people found this helpful

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Excellent Listen

As mentioned in the introduction, it was indeed a true "pleasure spending time in his company."

3 people found this helpful

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Utterly bland.

Choppy. A reading of a disjointed diary. I love Alan, but a little story telling, as opposed to a direct recitation, was disappointing. Got through almost 2 hours, before I gave up.

2 people found this helpful

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Larger than life but human

If you love Alan Rickman, and are hoping to get to know him better, this book manages to be both frustratingly limited, and intimately informative. The diary entries are as facinating as they are mundane, written in small snippets, with some story arcs playing out over many days or weeks of entries. The mundane aspect of the diary is partly what makes it interesting though, because despite doing normal things like going out to eat, or shopping- he is almost always in the company of someone else famous. He regularly hangs with Prime Ministers, and A list stars, but since it is a personal diary, he says exactly what he is thinking about these people- good or bad. His observations are often wry and insightful, with a little bit of catty bitchiness that made me laugh, and that you would not expect from someone like Alan Rickman.

Despite the limited information, you definitely get a sense of his commanding presence and love for his profession. You also see his enduring friendships and glimpses into his devotion to family. Equally, you get to see some of his deeper insecurities and self criticisms. He is also critical of others, almost to a fault, but also sensitive when the criticism is aimed at him. On the flip side, he is generous with praise for those lucky few that manage to gain his admiration. He and Rima definitely lived large, at a breakneck pace with travel, social engagements, food, and alcohol consumption that most 20 year olds would find hard to keep up with. At one point, I wondered why on earth an intelligent, introspective man like Alan Rickman would continue to repeatedly imbide to the point of excess, with all night parties and painful hangovers. It's hard not to feel that despite having a successful theater career, and honing his craft for years before hitting it big with Die Hard, he spends a lot of energy second guessing himself and trying to make up for lost time. Even so, he is far from being a vapid, Hollywood social butterfly. He seems to really care about the world outside of theater and acting, and works to quietly support others and make a difference. He often discusses Labor Party politics, and he truly put his beliefs on display while witing and producing, "My Name Is Rachel Corrie". He also seems to constantly battle his sharp tongue, and his impatience with people he finds irritating, underwhelming, or impertinent are some of the funniest moments in the diary. I think his wife and partner of over 50 years, Rima Horton, must have had the patience of a saint. You definitely get a sense of his reverence for her, if only because of the lack of criticism of her anywhere in the diary, which is truly notable, because no one else is spared. He also obviously loves his craft, and is always seeing the newest play or movie. Hearing his unfiltered thoughts on cinema and theater is fascinating. Over and over again, you hear that he admires those who approach life and art with openness and curiosity. He also repeatedly disdains close minded and selfish individuals.

As the diary continues, despite his hot and cold personality, I found myself genuinely liking the man. He reminds me of one of those grouchy, but endearing relatives. The type of person that you love all the more dearly because no matter what, they are uncompromisingly themselves. As he gets older, and suffers almost non-stop undiagnosed ailments, hindsight makes me want to scream- "For god sake, check his pancreas!" You also get to listen as one by one he loses friends and contemporaries to ailments and death. It is a matter of fact look at what inevitably happens as you grow older. It is in documenting these losses that you get to see how deeply he cares for others and how much these people have meant to him. Alan documents every single one of these losses with a blend of perfunctory explanation, and a sad sense of regret at the loss of someone he truly cared about. It is one of the harder parts of the diary to listen to, knowing that he is not far from that fate himself. The afterword, by Rima, about the days just before his death is heartbreaking.

In the end, I came away from this diary with a good deal of insight, and respect for Alan Rickman. It also leaves me wondering if he would have been appalled at strangers listening to his innermost thoughts, and criticisms. Given that he could hardly stomach the press intrusions into his private life, and bristled at thoughtless interviewers, I can't help but be a little uncomfortable at listening to the private thoughts, of a private man, who didn't write any of this for public consumption. Of course, as a fan, I am glad I got to see a little bit of who Alan Rickman really was, if only through snippets of his candid, unfiltered thoughts.

1 person found this helpful

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An amazing man's thoughts

I loved this book! it was so wonderful to hear his thoughts and experiences. I loved hearing about his interactions with his friends and Rima Afterward made me cry.

1 person found this helpful