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Publisher's Summary

Man and His Symbols owes its existence to one of Jung's own dreams. The great psychologist dreamed that his work was understood by a wide public, rather than just by psychiatrists, and therefore he agreed to write and edit this fascinating book. Here, Jung examines the full world of the unconscious, whose language he believed to be the symbols constantly revealed in dreams. Convinced that dreams offer practical advice, sent from the unconscious to the conscious self, Jung felt that self-understanding would lead to a full and productive life. Thus, the listener will gain new insights into himself from this thoughtful volume, which also illustrates symbols throughout history. Completed just before his death by Jung and his associates, it is clearly addressed to the general listener.

Praise for Man and His Symbols:

“This book, which was the last piece of work undertaken by Jung before his death in 1961, provides a unique opportunity to assess his contribution to the life and thought of our time, for it was also his first attempt to present his life-work in psychology to a non-technical public.... What emerges with great clarity from the book is that Jung has done immense service both to psychology as a science and to our general understanding of man in society, by insisting that imaginative life must be taken seriously in its own right, as the most distinctive characteristic of human beings.” (Guardian)

“Straightforward to read and rich in suggestion.” (John Barkham, Saturday Review Syndicate)

“This book will be a resounding success for those who read it.” (Galveston News-Tribune)

“A magnificent achievement.” (Main Currents)

“Factual and revealing.” (Atlanta Times)

©1964 Estate of C. G. Jung (P)2021 Random House Audio

Critic Reviews

“This book, which was the last piece of work undertaken by Jung before his death in 1961, provides a unique opportunity to assess his contribution to the life and thought of our time, for it was also his firsat attempt to present his life-work in psychology to a non-technical public.... What emerges with great clarity from the book is that Jung has done immense service both to psychology as a science and to our general understanding of man in society, by insisting that imaginative life must be taken seriously in its own right, as the most distinctive characteristic of human beings.” (Guardian)

“Straighforward to read and rich in suggestion.” (John Barkham, Saturday Review Syndicate

“This book will be a resounding success for those who read it.” (Galveston News-Tribune

What listeners say about Man and His Symbols

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Jung and golf balls.

Jung is a golf ball…a million different dimples around the sphere of the whole, and each leading to the center of wholeness, meaning and purpose.

Man and His Symbols is a great dimple or two worth of introduction to Jung, a little combo platter of mouth-watering appetizers to whet one’s appetite for exploration if the Unconscious and one’s own offerings from the unconscious.

Warning, though, this is not a golf ball that will ever be hit straight and kept predictably on the fairway. One must relish, or at least tolerate, playing from the rough and miring in traps. Sam Clemens might say Jung turns a spoiled walk back into a good one. Sinking the ball in the cup turns out to be of little importance in the golf game of Jung, but experiencing the wilds, roughs and traps of the Forbidden Forest of the Unconscious with the aim of wholeness and meaning is the whole point. It is a game of mulligans or, as Alfred Hitchcock, who loved golf, might say, a game of MacGuffins.

Enter the Unconscious at your own risk, for here there be dragons…though this is a great entryway to that danger!

To continue the literary circular braided Celtic associations, “Lead on McDuff!”

3 people found this helpful

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Worth listening to.... thrice perhaps....

Good, from start to finish. Very insightful and interesting read. Shines light on many different aspects of the mind and man's symbolism.

1 person found this helpful

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I’d prefer a different narrator.

The content is quite interesting. The narration is loathsome, dry, and annoying. Not trying to be mean. One would think the English accent would spice it up. Wrong, the guy has a monotone. Puts me to sleep.