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Publisher's Summary

Manias, Panics, and Crashes is a scholarly and entertaining account of the way that mismanagement of money and credit has led to financial explosions over the centuries. Covering such topics as the history and anatomy of crises, speculative manias, and the lender of last resort, this book has been hailed as "a true classic...both timely and timeless".

This seventh edition of an investment classic has been thoroughly revised and expanded following the latest crises to hit international markets. Renowned economist Robert Z. Aliber introduces the concept that global financial crises in recent years are not independent events, but symptomatic of an inherent instability in the international system.

©2015 Robert Z. Aliber and Charles P. Kindleberger (P)2021 Upfront Books

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What listeners say about Manias, Panics, and Crashes (Seventh Edition)

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Lack of theoretical underpinning

Very disappointing. I expected much better but never heard a word about central banks playing with money interest rates versus the natural rate of interest. Nor why with economic progress deflation of money prices should not be the natural order of things. So what did Benjamin Strong, Montagu Norman, Alan Greenspan, Ben Bernanke et al think they were doing? Economists rend to hate price controls so why is fixing interest rates by central bank fiat compatible with a properly functioning economy? There was no economic theory underpinning to explain what started to sound like a pastiche of media stories since the the 70s

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Way over my head

Some pieces of it were really good but was way too verbose and complicated for me

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Save your money

HORRIBLE narration. Unbearable droning on and on with a faux British accent. Bizzarre misproununciations. The content is boring, repetitive and I've heard all of it in other books.

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Financial crashes

Seems to drag on forever without sufficient periodic analysis. It would b3 useful to talk about social implications

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A classic, but not an easy classic

This is a classic. The book on history of financial crises. All stages of a crisis are beautifully explained and generalized. Having said that, this is not an easy listen. Not really a book you want to run an extra lap to finish a chapter.

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  • JUNIO
  • 05-08-21

Information detail overload! Could be rearranged to common elements.

Information detail overload! Could be rearranged to common elements like for example a surge in easy credit always leads creditors not being able get new loans to pay off old loans.

Allowing financial companies to get around regional rule always lead to excess payment issues elsewhere which always came back to negatively affect the original country.