1 title per month from Audible’s entire catalog of best sellers, and new releases.
Access a growing selection of included Audible Originals, audiobooks and podcasts.
You will get an email reminder before your trial ends.
Your Premium Plus plan is $14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Meade at Gettysburg  By  cover art

Meade at Gettysburg

By: Kent Masterson Brown
Narrated by: Shawn Compton
Try for $0.00

$14.95/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.

Buy for $17.49

Buy for $17.49

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

Although he took command of the Army of the Potomac only three days before the first shots were fired at Gettysburg, Union general George G. Meade guided his forces to victory in the Civil War's most pivotal battle. Commentators often dismiss Meade when discussing the great leaders of the Civil War. But in this long-anticipated book, Kent Masterson Brown draws on an expansive archive to reappraise Meade's leadership during the Battle of Gettysburg. Using Meade's published and unpublished papers along with a variety of other sources, Brown highlights how Meade's rapid advance of the army to Gettysburg on July 1, his tactical control and coordination of the army in the desperate fighting on July 2, and his determination to hold his positions on July 3 insured victory. 

Brown argues that supply deficiencies, brought about by the army's unexpected need to advance to Gettysburg, were crippling. In spite of that, Meade pursued Lee's retreating army rapidly, and his decision not to blindly attack Lee's formidable defenses near Williamsport on July 13 was entirely correct in spite of subsequent harsh criticism. Combining compelling narrative with incisive analysis, this finely rendered work deepens our understanding of the Army of the Potomac as well as the machinations of the Gettysburg Campaign, restoring Meade to his rightful place in the Gettysburg narrative.

©2021 The University of North Carolina Press (P)2021 Tantor

More from the same

What listeners say about Meade at Gettysburg

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    75
  • 4 Stars
    13
  • 3 Stars
    4
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    63
  • 4 Stars
    13
  • 3 Stars
    9
  • 2 Stars
    3
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    72
  • 4 Stars
    11
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    3
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Fantastic Book

Everything about this book was excellent, except for the minor point that some seemingly well known names/words were mispronounced.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Makes Strong Case for Meade

This book admirably makes its case that Meade’s generalship at Gettysburg was excellent and that he was justified in not attacking Lee’s strongly fortified lines before Lee’s army retreated over the Potomac. As to the latter Lee was effectively dug in and the numbers of the two armies were almost equal. While the author did not discuss Grant, Grant later always had superior numbers allowing him to be aggressive. The battle scenes at Gettysburg are from Meade’s perspective and so are intentionally not complete.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Finally! Well Deserved.

Wonderfully written analysis of Meade’s contributions for the Union at Gettysburg. A new look at some of the reasons for Meade’s decisions after the Battle of Gettysburg. If you like history, especially Civil War history, then you will not be disappointed in this book.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Same old tune

Tries to bury Pfanz and Coddington very early on. Same old story Hancock vs Howard, Meade was all about his pipe creek line and ignorant of Gettysburg etc etc. ignores most of the major breakthroughs of the modern era on the battle history wise. I would recommend the author look closer at works by James Hessler, Wayne Mott and Tim Smith. I could not get through the final seven hours. My eyes were rolling out of my head.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

From the General’s POV

An excellent analysis of the battle of Gettysburg from the Union Side . This book was strong because it stuck to its topic. A lot of civil war battle books are simply a stringing together of good ole boy stories with a loose overall narrative. Not this work , it sticks to Meade and his POV . The pre and post battle were covered with new (2021) well researched insights . I especially liked the research into the supply of the army of the Potomac and Meads’ strategy going into Gettysburg .

If you are a big fan of the genre you will also find fascinating the author directly calling out some prominent civil war writers on poor Gettysburg and Meade research .

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Boring

For every two pieces of interesting information, you have to wade through eight pieces of minutia. I kept thinking it would get better, but it did not and I quit half way through.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Best Civil War Book Ever

Absolutely thorough in explaining the circumstances and actions of General Meade. I learned a great deal about the tactical problems and the conditions of the Army of the Potomac in this comprehensive and well told narrative.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

A Totally New Understanding of Gettysburg

The author writes the history in the tone of a novel which keeps the reader’s interest level high. He writes the story of the battle from the point of view of General Meade who has to be the most misunderstood figure of the Civil War. There are new interpretations based on evidence and logic. I particularly liked the later part of the book that deals extensively with the days after the battle. The author showed that the Union army was actually in worse shape than the Confederate army and Lee occupied the high ground on the retreat back to Virginia. Really good material and insight. The narrator did an outstanding job. If you want to learn something really knew about Gettysburg, this is your book.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Great book, not so great narration

This is a must read for any student of Gettysburg or the civil war in general! It definitely fills in a gap by taking a much needed and objective look at Meade and his generalship both during the battle and the campaign in general. While the narrator had a very good tone and pace his pronunciation of names was at times quite bad!

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

An interesting study in command...

of Meade. The narration was mediocre and he mispronounced many names and places which was distracting. A better narrator would have improved the listening experience.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 09-29-22

Excellent in-depth analysis of Meade; Horrible narration

This is a fantastic, and much needed, evaluation of George Meade during the Gettysburg Campaign. Kent Masterson Brown clearly spent a lot of time in researching material for this book. Though Meade is the winner of the battle, he has been largely ignored by Civil War scholars, and is greatly undervalued/studied even by Gettysburg scholars. This is a must read for students of the battle.

I confess this is the first audio book that I have ever listened to. That being said, if the narrations continue in this vein I am not sure how many more I will do. Thankfully the text is wonderfully written, otherwise this would be a total dud. There is no enthusiasm in the narrators voice. That could be excused, what cannot is the gross mispronunciation of basic militarily terms (eg. corps) and elementary Civil War names (eg. Heth).

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Patto53
  • Patto53
  • 07-26-22

New Facts of a Well Analysed Battle

I have always believed Meade has been unfairly treated by history. This book includes a small but very significant discovery: Meade's hand written orders to Renolds. The battle at Gettysburg was unintended by both sides. Meade wanted to draw Less south to a battlefield of his choosing with a large supply base nearbye. The exhaustion of troops, massive loss of horses/mules, shortage of ammunition made an attack on Lees well prepared defence line on the Potomic simply impossible. Meade had already achieved the first defeat of Lee in the war.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 12-07-21

Maps are needed

My only criticism, is that without maps to refer to, the exhaustive descriptions of locations and troop dispositions quickly looses the listeners ability to follow.