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Publisher's Summary

In Minuteman: A Technical History of the Missile That Defined American Nuclear Warfare, David K. Stumpf demystifies the intercontinental ballistic missile program that was conceived at the end of the Eisenhower administration as a key component of the US nuclear strategy of massive retaliation. Although its nuclear warhead may have lacked power relative to that of the Titan II, the Minuteman more than made up for this in terms of numbers and readiness to launch - making it the ultimate ICBM.

Minuteman offers a fascinating look at the technological breakthroughs necessary to field this weapon system that has served as a powerful component of the strategic nuclear triad for more than half a century. With exacting detail, Stumpf examines the construction of launch and launch control facilities; innovations in solid propellant, lightweight inertial guidance systems, and lightweight reentry vehicle development; and key flight tests and operational flight programs - all while situating the Minuteman program in the context of world events. In doing so, the author reveals how the historic missile has adapted to changing defense strategies - from counterforce to mutually assured destruction to sufficiency.

The book is published by The University of Arkansas Press. The audiobook is published by University Press Audiobooks.

“An exceptionally important contribution to the historiography of air power and the strategic triad.” (Roger D. Launius, author of Reaching for the Moon)

“An important addition to the literature on the history of US strategic missiles." (Christopher John Gainor, author of The Bomb and America’s Missile Age)

“A timely and valuable contribution.” (Leonard H. Caveny, former director of science and technology, Ballistic Missile Defense Organization)

©2020 The University of Arkansas Press (P)2021 Redwood Audiobooks

What listeners say about Minuteman

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Enough with the acronyms!

Could you spell out anymore acronyms!

If you want to get a headache this is your book.

I'm former Air Force.

I don't know if the performer or the people proof listening the book had no prior service but enough already.

How many times can someone spell out S.A.C.,H.Q.S.A.C. or C.I.N.C.S.A.C. etc.

Just explain like in every other military type book.

S.A.C. the Strategic Air Command pronounced sack.

You didn't do that and made the book almost impossible to listen to.

Will not recommend.

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An Incredible Technical History

As thorough as I could have hoped for. Tedious at times, but that is just the nature of the subject matter. And while I agree that the narrator needs to know how to convey acronyms properly, I quickly got used to it. An important work on an important device. Well done.

1 person found this helpful

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Historically significant work

I've studied Command and Control (C2) of nuclear forces for 40+ years. Served a role in the execution of emergency war orders (EWO) during the '80's. This book provides insight at an extraordinarily details level. I've listened in total three times. Parts many more while having the hardcopy accompanying.

Only annoyance is the constant recitation of acronyms as letters vs stating the proper or common name, e.g. S-A-C vs SAC(k) or Strategic Air Command, LF vs Launch Facility, LCC vs Launch Control Center.

1 person found this helpful