• Move Your Bus

  • An Extraordinary New Approach to Accelerating Success in Work and Life
  • By: Ron Clark
  • Narrated by: Ron Clark
  • Length: 4 hrs and 1 min
  • 4.8 out of 5 stars (768 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

New York Times best-selling author and award-winning educator Ron Clark applies his successful leadership principles to the business world in this effective and accessible guidebook, perfect for any manager looking to inspire and motivate his or her team.

Teamwork is crucial to the success of any business, and as acclaimed author and speaker Ron Clark illustrates, the members of any team are the key to unlocking success. Imagine a company as a bus filled with people who either help or hinder a team's ability to move it forward: drivers (who steer the organization), runners (who consistently go above and beyond for the good of the organization), joggers (who do their jobs without pushing themselves), walkers (who are just getting pulled along), and riders (who hinder success and drag the team down). It's the team leader's job to recognize how members fall into these categories, encourage them to keep the "bus" moving by working together, and know when it's time to kick the riders off.

In the tradition of Who Moved My Cheese? and Fish!, Move Your Bus is an accessible and uplifting business parable that illustrates Clark's expert strategies to maximize the performance of each member of a team. These easy to implement techniques will inspire employees and team leaders alike to work harder and smarter and drive the organization to succeed.

©2015 Ron L. Clark, Inc. (P)2015 Simon & Schuster

What listeners say about Move Your Bus

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Depressingly Repetitive

This book was written, as if written by a man who got overly acknowledged for something he should have been trying to do as a teacher anyways!!!!

As a teacher myself, I can, and have, taken a class of highest poverty and trauma, low achieving, below grade level students and turn them into a class where every child in my and only my class alone in my school learned to read at or far above grade level on their end of year state tests, too. I did it this year.

I was looking for a book to motivate me, and push this to this level or a next level. I was not interested in hearing over and over and over again about those who do not do well and just skim by, and about how Ron Clark ignores the teachers he calls riders, walkers, etc., in his school, and how awesome he finds the highest achieving ones. I’m not sure whether he realizes this book is more of just a way to talk about himself and what he does, or not.

I was looking for a book for teachers who successfully do have and continue to push above and beyond. Not to hear about the teachers who do not. That was mostly what this book was like. It was depressing!

I’m off to read, Teach Like a Pirate, now! That books is motivational and fun for those who are more ambitious and fun! Oh, and high achieving.

9 people found this helpful

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Many problems with this book

There are some good take aways. Knowing when to stop the bus and pouring into top performers. The author relies too heavily on his experience only. He tried investing in one person he felt was a walker and it didn’t work out so he gave up. He stretched his bus metaphor to relationships and gave the advice to find a new bus if your boy/ girl friend is a walker or rider. He had set up a shopping spree to help his teachers dress for work. He didn’t like the reaction of a few people so he stopped doing it. To be a leader is to add value not to get offended and remove value. Naming the school after himself fit with the prideful tone of the book. Compared to other leadership books this one did not compete.

6 people found this helpful

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The ending

Amazing book to help me continue to move forward in my restaurant and the ending was literally a tear jerker

2 people found this helpful

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Couldn't get past author's sense of superiority.

From the author's reading, you can tell he is a positive, high energy person, and it's easy to see how he could be a very engaging teacher or leader. He seems like he'd be fun to be around. But in this book he brags a lot. The first chapter is entirely dedicated to this, and the rest of the book saturated. It starts obnoxiously. And ends painfully. Perhaps he's hoping to build credibility, but the effect is opposite. It projects a major character flaw which colors the whole book, making the reader hesitant to let the author be the role model he's trying to be.

The main analogy describes 4 classes of worker, ranging linearly from high performers to deadweights. The author makes good points about how the actions of an individual can help or hurt the team as a whole. It does inspire one to want to be a high achiever, and gives an assortment of tips and suggestions for ways to do so, backed up with many interesting anecdotes.

Unfortunately, one can probably guess how the narcissism of the author interacts with a one-dimensional classification system of people. The book is filled with disparaging remarks toward the lower classes. You can hear the genuine disbelief and shock at people who don't share his strengths and abilities. These low performers are imbued with every negative trait possible in a coworker. And what's worse is the classes are prescriptive as much as descriptive. Low performers just are the way they are (bless their hearts). They may improve a little bit, but not much. As a leader you should invest in the people who already doing well; the rest are a waste of your time. At one point he actually presents a cringeworthy plea to these "low performers" to get out of the way, and maybe pick up some grunt work, so that the high performers can excel.

Overall, I cannot recommend the book, because it encourages an elitist attitude toward "the successful", and a condescending attitude toward everyone else.

1 person found this helpful

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Old system

Part of this was good and this mentality is not new it's an old system. You as a person dedicate yourself to the business, but in today's world the business does not dedicate itself to you. So why runner can go above and beyond in the end this is not your grandma company where they took care of you the rest of your life and when a book tells you in your personal life if your spouse or somebody else is not standing par you should dump them. This mentality is not one that brings us as a society but drives us to be devote all of are time to work and drop those that need strong people in there life.

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Self proclamation contradicting itself. Tiring listen

“I did not want to write this book but I had to. Surprise, hero of this story is… me!” Seriously. What a waste of time

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Excellent!

I enjoy every page of this book. It’s simple, gave great examples and I will definitely try to apply in the organization I work for.

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Worth reading!!

Ron Clark's narration of this book and epilogue was an added bonus. As i was listening to him describe eavh person on the bus it made me think about what persona I most resemble on the bus.

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God bless Ron Clark

such an inspirational book. I hope I can run fast enough and far enough to put all of the things in this book into practice in my life and work.

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You run your fastest mile with a fast runner

Great listen. Incredible story and passion. This really reinforces how modeling and rewarding good behavior as well as leadership at the top setting the bar high helps achieve greatness.

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  • Katarina B.
  • 04-05-20

Good read!

Relevant, clear and read with emotion. Memorable anecdotes and really cleverly done work. Thank you.