• Mythology: African Myths, Gods, Heroes, and Legends

  • By: Ron Carver
  • Narrated by: John Griffith
  • Length: 3 hrs and 2 mins
  • 4.6 out of 5 stars (157 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

As you study the African myths, legends, and folklore through this guide, you will find that there are so many gods and goddesses, and so many different versions of certain stories, that it will blow your mind. The intricate myths in this book have been lined up and collected to help you understand some of the earliest, most ancient beliefs from those living on the African continent. Some have been influential in our day, and some have been completely forgotten except for vague traditions that have been passed on from one generation to the next.

Hear about the creation of the universe, plants, animals, and finally, the woman first and the man second (how ironic). You’ll find out what significance a tortoise made in one particular African myth, why and how the sex goddess was worshipped and feared, which historical and cultural facts helped the Africans believe in these things, and how some of these customs have been introduced in our modern-day culture.Begin today and find out more about these fascinating facts and myths!

©2019 Ron Carver (P)2019 Ron Carver
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: History

What listeners say about Mythology: African Myths, Gods, Heroes, and Legends

Average Customer Ratings
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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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Excellent

This is a really good book for those who want to learn more about African mythology. What I liked was, obviously, the narrator, but aside from that, I thought a lot of stories and gods we hear about nowadays, are Greek or Roman. Never mind that the African continent was full of folklore and worshippers of nature and unseen beings. So yeah, finally something about that.

If I had to point out one thing, it would be that the creation story dragged on a bit. But it actually didn't bother me. It was longer than some of the other chapters, and that's all that needs to be said about that.

All the other things were just great. So yeah, go for it, if you're like me.

15 people found this helpful

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A lot can be said

A lot can be said about African mythology. This guide does an amazing job summing it all up. Maybe there were more stories out there 2,000 years ago. I actually don't doubt that. But hey, this fraction of the belief system is a giant piece of pulling back the veil of ignorance for all these people in the western world who don't know diddly squat about Africa. Good job.

10 people found this helpful

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Africans had some interesting things

They believed in some strange stories and some strange invisible creatures, man. This is a cool book. Get it.

6 people found this helpful

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Its alright

This book is informative but could have been a bit more thorough. Also it is literally and I mean literally a word for word reading of various wikipedia pages. And no this text is not the reference for the wiki pages.

4 people found this helpful

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Lost Treasures

Thank you for this work because there is so much African history that has been destroyed and/or JUST NOT TOLD do to racist ideology! As a black man in America, I would love MORE works like this because personally I have a lot of catching up to do with regards to my history!

4 people found this helpful

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Tired of the same stuff

This is just another book that sugarcoated slavery!!! Tell the real story! Returning for my credit now!!

3 people found this helpful

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meh..

For me this book was poorly written and read. The author's use if the word "actually" and the narrator's emphasis of the word seems to imply not objectivity but judgement. The narrator also spoke too swiftly, even when I slowed the speech down it seemed as if the narrator was in a hurry and just wanted to be done.

2 people found this helpful

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Overview of African Myths

It’s a combination of history and myths. Wanted the myths to sound more like a story than a person summarizing the story. At least that how it sounded to me

1 person found this helpful

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Overall sloppy, and not what I expected

I was expecting to hear some tellings of African myths. I listened for over an hour and got very little actual mythology. This book feels like listening to someone read an encyclopedia, as it spends much more time on modern depictions and spread of mythological figures, the historical effects of European colonization, and such. It spends very little time on the actual myths and stories, and when it does it jumps right to comparative themes, completely glossing over the stories themselves.

While the narrator does a serviceable job, the editing is sloppy. Sounds of paper shuffling are present. The bigger issue is the lack of any pause between sentences. In the span of a single chapter, it'll go from etymology, to history, to descriptions of visual representations, to thematic elements, to cultural migration, to modern influences all in one, long, unbroken speech. I found it exhausting to listen to.

Finally, there were minor grammatical errors that stood out to me, some of which could be either a flub of the narrator or the way it's written. I lean towards the latter because some of the vocabulary used is rather odd for what is otherwise an attempt at a fairly formal style, such as using the word "boobs" instead of "breasts." Not a big deal if you're going for a more casual, approachable style throughout, but that's not the case here. It's just weird, and it feels like the author didn't really have a solid grasp of who the book was supposed to be aimed it. The text itself is in desperate need of a qualified editor.

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Disrespectful

This book is... upsetting. The author obviously has a deep misunderstanding of many things, only being that what he calls "fans" are actually worshippers of a faith other than his own. The only religion he named as such and respected was Christianity and he repeatedly referenced "the Indian religion" when referring to the multiple religions of India, of which I can name four off the top of my head.
It also primarily focuses on the "contributions" of colonizers on the stories without ever actually telling the stories themselves, affected by colonization or otherwise.
The disrespect of the many different deities and spirits in this book rivals that of the king who cut down Demeter's favorite dryad.

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Profile Image for Me1989
  • Me1989
  • 04-24-21

Dry and overly focused on present day

Imagine picking up a book on Greek mythology and half of it talks about the country’s modern financial policy.
This is that book, only about Africa. The book spends way too much attention on the modern day influences, whereas the myths themselves are described briefly and lifelessly, almost as a justification to talk about the 20th century. If you want to know which comic book character has a myth-related tattoo or which rapper made a mix-tape about a particular hero plot, maybe it’s a good book for you. For a person who’s interested in ancient mythologies and can see the modern day influences for themselves this is as useful and enjoyable as a Wikipedia page.
The performance is a bit too quick, but overall very good.

4 people found this helpful