• Nation of Victims

  • Identity Politics, the Death of Merit, and the Path Back to Excellence
  • By: Vivek Ramaswamy
  • Narrated by: Timothy Pabon
  • Length: 7 hrs and 42 mins
  • 4.6 out of 5 stars (184 ratings)

1 title per month from Audible’s entire catalog of best sellers, and new releases.
Access a growing selection of included Audible Originals, audiobooks and podcasts.
You will get an email reminder before your trial ends.
Your Premium Plus plan is $14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Nation of Victims  By  cover art

Nation of Victims

By: Vivek Ramaswamy
Narrated by: Timothy Pabon
Try for $0.00

$14.95/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.

Buy for $20.90

Buy for $20.90

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

The New York Times bestselling author of Woke Inc. makes the case that the essence of true American identity is to pursue excellence unapologetically and reject victimhood culture.

Hardship is now equated with victimhood. Outward displays of vulnerability in defeat are celebrated over winning unabashedly. The pursuit of excellence and exceptionalism are at the heart of American identity, and the disappearance of these ideals in our country leaves a deep moral and cultural vacuum in its wake.

But the solution isn’t to simply complain about it. It’s to revive a new cultural movement in America that puts excellence first again.

New York Times bestselling author Vivek Ramaswamy makes the case from firsthand experience that the essence of true American identity is to pursue excellence unapologetically—no matter your skin color or where your parents came from.

Leaders have called Ramaswamy “the most compelling conservative voice in the country” and “one of the towering intellects in America,” and this book reveals why: he spares neither left nor right in this scathing indictment of the victimhood culture at the heart of America’s national decline.

Following the success of his instant bestseller Woke Inc., Ramaswamy explains in his new book that we’re a nation of victims now. It’s one of the few things we still have left in common—across black victims, white victims, liberal victims, and conservative victims. Victims of each other, and ultimately, of ourselves.

This fearless, provocative book is for readers who dare to look in the mirror and question their most sacred assumptions about who we are and how we got here. Intricately tracing history from the fall of Rome to the rise of America, weaving Western philosophy with Eastern theology in ways that moved Jefferson and Adams centuries ago, this book describes the rise and the fall of the American experiment itself—and hopefully its reincarnation.

©2022 Vivek Ramaswamy (P)2022 Center Street

Critic Reviews

“Vivek Ramaswamy’s first book solved one of the strangest riddles of our time: how corporate America went woke. His new book addresses an even bigger question: how a nation that once celebrated heroism turned into a nation that celebrates victimhood. Compelling, persuasive, and deeply needed.”—Douglas Murray, Bestselling author and associate editor of The Spectator
“This book shows why Vivek Ramaswamy is one of the most original thinkers—and doers—of our time. Instead of wallowing in the left’s cult of victimhood and its recipe for mediocrity, Vivek challenges all of us to return to the path of achievement and excellence.”—Ben Shapiro, Bestselling author and host of The Ben Shapiro Show
“If you want an intellectually honest book that spares no side from their hypocrisies, Vivek Ramaswamy’s NATION OF VICTIMS is it. He delivers thought-provoking anecdotes about the foundation of our country and what has shaped his independent worldview in a way that encourages substantive dialogue, understanding, and respect.”—Tulsi Gabbard, Former congresswoman and Democratic candidate for president in 2020

More from the same

What listeners say about Nation of Victims

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    133
  • 4 Stars
    34
  • 3 Stars
    12
  • 2 Stars
    4
  • 1 Stars
    1
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    125
  • 4 Stars
    27
  • 3 Stars
    4
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    3
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    114
  • 4 Stars
    29
  • 3 Stars
    11
  • 2 Stars
    3
  • 1 Stars
    2

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Good book if not as good as Woke, Inc.

Vivek Ramaswamy is not your typical conservative. Some of his policy suggestions - such as the inheritance tax he discusses in the penultimate chapter - would be viewed as anathema by most conservatives and probably all libertarians.

In "Nation of Victims," Ramaswamy has written the natural follow-up to "Woke, Inc." While that book dealt with corporate America and how we can combat the woke-ness of the corporate giants that now run the country, his latest book is more about how a nation can survive when it seems like it is doomed to fall under the weight of its excesses. He uses examples from history, including the U.S. Civil War and, particularly, the Roman Republic and Roman Empire, to make his point that victimhood is destroying the country. His solution is a return to merit - but only to a point. Interestingly, he comes to the conclusion - backed by an assortment of authors including John Rawls and Thomas Piketty in particular - that merit is a good thing, but only to a point. Eventually, a meritocracy will give way to an aristocracy for reasons that I won't go into here.

All in all, it was an interesting analysis of some of the major issues plaguing the USA and contained some interesting solutions. I give Ramaswamy credit not just for raising the issues, but for thinking about solutions, whether or not I agree with them.

I didn't think this was as interesting as his last book but it was still worthwhile.

One reason why I gave the performance only 3 stars - and that is being generous - is because Timothy Pabon mispronounces some names and places. Sure, it doesn't occur often, but when it does, it was like an icepick being jammed in my ear. He mispronounces "Spokane" (as in the city in Washington state, spo-cane instead of spo-can), mispronounces Antonin Scalia (until, later in the book, someone must have corrected him and he pronounces it mostly correctly), and mispronounces Peter Thiel (his last name is pronounced "teal", NOT "thee-ul" - the "h" is silent). In fact, the most baffling part of this audiobook, and one reason that it just didn't capture me like "Woke, Inc." was that it wasn't read by Vivek Ramaswamy. I can't for the life of me figure out why Ramaswamy didn't read his own book like he did last time.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Great listen

Overall very interesting listen. Compelling narrative. Would recommend to both conservatives and liberals to listen.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Another Compelling & Fantastic Read

Nation of Victims lives up to the hype; and the attention surrounding Vivek Ramaswamy and this second book following Woke Inc. is well deserved. In Nation of Victim’s, Vivek makes a compelling case surrounding the death of merit and the need to revive a culture of excellence. Importantly, this is communicated in a POSITIVE way that can be unifying to our country. Clearly and effectively written.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Disappointing

The overall theme is compelling especially the idea of excellence and everyone claiming victimhood.
However, many examples were weak and some of the writing unfocused.
The Daryl Davis story the best vignette.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • HS
  • 09-18-22

Powerful Considerations

The author’s background is impressive, well researched, and he provides some important things to think about from a dignified & respectful position.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Value of Respect

Vivek Ramaswamy did explain himself in confronting our lives as a victim in a nation of victims around us and included the connection we all are subjective.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars

globalist dribble

author thinks your job should be sent overseas and he wants the government to take your childs inheritance

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Thought Provoking

Has Many Insites Worthy to Ponder and Consider both on a personal basis as well as, as a nation.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

A deep dive into our future options for our country..

Includes the positives and negatives of existing and long-gone nations. The presentation kept me from putting my iPhone down. I wanted to understand more about history. The epilogue tied the entire audiobook together. Great job.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Fantastic book

Beautifully written, sweeping book covering history, philosophy, law, politics, and a small well placed touch of Hinduism. I am a lifelong Democrat, but would vote for Vivek if he ran for office. He speaks the common sense this country needs to hear.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for CarloG
  • CarloG
  • 10-09-22

Very good book, a bit tedious in some parts, but overall a good read on an important topic

Very interesting book for those who want to better understand the current state of the US. The analysis of the culture of victimhood in America dives deep into the old grudges of the Civil War and dares to spam back all the way to ancient Rome to give a better picture of the current decline of the USA. The point of view is conservative and I personally don’t agree with many things said, but there are plenty of good arguments to find a common ground here.