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Publisher's Summary

What has happened to the American spirit? We've gone from "Give me liberty, or give me death!" to "Take care of me, please." Our colleges were once bastions of free speech; now they're bastions of speech codes. Our culture once rewarded independence; now it rewards victimhood. Parents once taught their kids how to fend for themselves; now, any parent who tries may get a visit from the police.

In Not a Day Care, Dr. Everett Piper, president of Oklahoma Wesleyan University and author of the viral essay, "This Is Not a Day Care. It's a University!" takes a hard look at what's happening around the country - including the demand for "safe spaces" and trigger warnings at universities like Yale, Brandeis, and Oberlin - and digs in his heels against the sad and dangerous infantilization of the American spirit.

©2017 Everett Piper (P)2017 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What listeners say about Not a Day Care

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The book comes from a fair Christian perspective

I am not a Christian, but I agree with the main thrust of this book. It is well worth the listen. I believe the author wishes to be fair with everyone and would not discriminate against someone with a different religion. he is mostly discussing the illogical of the new anti free speech movement, AKA label it "hate speech" then shut it down argument. He is promoting honest debate with courtesy for others.

I did not like the narrator's style or tone, but the subject is so important and the analysis so good I can overlook that.
Although I have been critical of some things the main message gets my positive approval. I recommend this book highly.

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Must read for every parent

Spot on and Well-written , I will definitely reconsider what colleges I send my kids to

4 people found this helpful

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About Time

I fully agree it was about time a university administrator said this. I am a 20 year veteran so was a much older person when I started and then obtained my degree. It was amazing to me how self absorbed and unknowing the young students were being as they were indoctrinated. There were many who tried to impose their beliefs onto me and all were treated equally by me. I would always endeavor to educate them and was often told by these students they never knew or heard of the many counter arguments I made. there was even several professors who told me how appreciative they were of my presence in their classes giving the counter arguments they could not because they were afraid of losing their job.

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  • VC
  • 06-28-18

Builds to Let Down

The first half of the book was great discussing how much of a joke college has become and the consequences of raising a society of pussies that need to hug teddy bears because they cannot handle the real world. Sadly, the book diminished in the second half and basically turns into a sermon. Would have been much better without the preaching.

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  • KJ
  • 09-01-21

Complete trash

I read this in an attempt to better understand a viewpoint very different from my own. Instead, this book affirmed the worst parts of the far Christian right. The author talked a lot about how terrible people in the LGBTQ community are and how ludicrous it is to expect others to use preferred pronouns. He also completely denied the existence of trans individuals and made a mockery of their situations. According to him, people are inherently evil (original sin and all) and that we must treat kids and teens as such or we risk “coddling” them. Millennials are the worst generation ever too. We’re not supposed to acknowledge differences as we’re “all the same.” Cool unless you’re not white or are in another oppressed group. So so much to unpack in this hateful rant. But if you take the Bible literally and hate others under the guise of “caring about them,” you might like this. As for everyone else, don’t waste your time. I walk away from this book even more disgusted with and mistrusting of organized religion and the people that are members of it. If God exists, I think they’re likely embarrassed by the contents of this book being attributed to their teachings.

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Not much new, and awful narration

The ideas and information shared in this book are hardly novel for anyone who is up on current events and news. and for that, it offers little insight or failed to deepen my understanding. . Also, the book would have been stronger if the author could have based his argument on more reason and less religion. I say this, despite the fact that I am a Christian and I am sympathetic to his concerns. But the real fault of this book is the reader, who sounds like a overly dramatic 1980s newscaster. The heavy handed narration made the author's arguments harder to take seriously.

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A wake up call!

I am truly thankful none of my children ever had the desire to go to college.

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Someone finally said it!

A perfect wake up call to the truth about where we are headed if change does not happen.

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An Essay Stretched into a Book

This is another one of those essays that is turned into a book for no good reason except to cash in on the popularity of the original piece. Just reading the title of this book gives you 50% of the contents. The author simply repeats over and over again that schools should challenge students and not be safe spaces. Okay, I agree. Someone needs to address this topic properly. But this book brings nothing to the table beyond what was in the original (much shorter essay). Just google the name of the essay and read it for free. Save yourself from 5 hours of repetition.

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Where is compassion?

When I started this book I expected to agree with its message, and certainly Dr. Piper made cogent points about civil discussion and the search for truth. But somewhere, he lost me. The search for truth, for him, is a very narrow search indeed, and he falls into the same political crevasse that has swallowed up America's evangelical Christians for the last 30 years.

In the 1970s, I married into an evangelical denomination and was happy there, growing in Christian knowledge and love and serving God in joy. By the end of the 1980s, anyone who was a registered Democrat was starting to feel uncomfortable about what was happening in most of our church, and within a few years, we were no longer welcome in our church home.

The crevasse that has swallowed evangelicals is a form of socio-political tunnel vision. And this tunnel vision leaves no room for compassion. I do not say that Dr. Piper or others lack personal compassion necessarily, but their political loyalties are utterly lacking in community compassion: in the will to feed the hungry, to house the poor, can find a place to live, to treat with respect the children of our Heavenly Father.

Dr. Piper's sarcasm and Pharisaical condescension in the latter part of the book expose his sense of absolute confidence that he, and he alone, knows everything. Remember that St. Paul said, "I decided to know... only Jesus Christ, and Him crucified."

I stopped listening.

(I am still a Christian, but I'm affiliated with a denomination which emphasizes compassion over political orthodoxy. )