• Oroonoko, or the Royal Slave

  • By: Aphra Behn
  • Narrated by: Margaret Melosh
  • Length: 2 hrs and 48 mins
  • 4.0 out of 5 stars (3 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

"Oroonoko, or The Royal Slave" is the story of an African prince who ultimately ends up in Surinam as a slave. It is also a touching love story of the prince and his one and only love, despite the common practice of polygamy. Tragedy and revenge, or tragic revenge, if you will, is also another strong component of the story. A fascinating tale, both historically and emotionally.

Public Domain (P)2019 Musaicum Books

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Difficult read

I had to read this one for World Lit, but if I picked it up on my own, I wouldn't have finished it. The author uses language to suggest everything in her life was great and wonderful and grand and etc. Sort of made sense at first but after a while, hearing the same phrase over and over made it hard to read. Also (and I think most would guess,) she is really really ok with slavery. This is an account of slavery from a European perspective, but I would like to point out she seems to go out of her way to paint everything in very flowery, rosy language which made me think she didn't actually know anything about the subject matter. Like I get that a Europeans would view slavery in a positive light back then, but the way she described it is simply not true.