• Our Mathematical Universe

  • My Quest for the Ultimate Nature of Reality
  • By: Max Tegmark
  • Narrated by: Rob Shapiro
  • Length: 15 hrs and 22 mins
  • 4.6 out of 5 stars (2,353 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Max Tegmark leads us on an astonishing journey through past, present and future, and through the physics, astronomy, and mathematics that are the foundation of his work, most particularly his hypothesis that our physical reality is a mathematical structure and his theory of the ultimate multiverse. In a dazzling combination of both popular and groundbreaking science, he not only helps us grasp his often mind-boggling theories, but he also shares with us some of the often surprising triumphs and disappointments that have shaped his life as a scientist. Fascinating from first to last - this is a book that has already prompted the attention and admiration of some of the most prominent scientists and mathematicians.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2014 Max Tegmark (P)2013 Random House Audio

Critic Reviews

“Tegmark offers a fascinating exploration of multiverse theories, each one offering new ways to explain ‘quantum weirdness’ and other mysteries that have plagued physicists, culminating in the idea that our physical world is ‘a giant mathematical object’ shaped by geometry and symmetry. Tegmark’s writing is lucid, enthusiastic, and outright entertaining, a thoroughly accessible discussion leavened with anecdotes and the pure joy of a scientist at work.” (Publishers Weekly, starred review)

“Lively and lucid, the narrative invites general readers into debates over computer models for brain function, over scientific explanations of consciousness, and over prospects for finding advanced life in other galaxies. Though he reflects soberly on the perils of nuclear war and of hostile artificial intelligence, Tegmark concludes with a bracingly upbeat call for scientifically minded activists who recognize a rare opportunity to make our special planet a force for cosmic progress. An exhilarating adventure for bold readers.” (Bryce Cristensen, Booklist, starred review)

“Our Mathematical Universe boldly confronts one of the deepest questions at the fertile interface of physics and philosophy: why is mathematics so spectacularly successful at describing the cosmos? Through lively writing and wonderfully accessible explanations, Max Tegmark—one of the world’s leading theoretical physicists—guides the reader to a possible answer, and reveals how, if it’s right, our understanding of reality itself would be radically altered.” (Brian Greene, physicist, author of The Elegant Universe and The Hidden Reality)  

What listeners say about Our Mathematical Universe

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Wow!

Great ideas and great narration makes this a great audio book. The last quarter of this book has some of the most interesting ideas in physics I have heard. I think these ideas are, by far, the most likely to lead to progress in physics. The first three-quarters is good, but is just a nice rehash similar to a bunch of other speculative physics books covering a brief history of cosmology leading to the theory of inflation and various levels of multiple universes, Boltzmann brains and such, finally culminating in the Measure Problem (one cannot assign consistent probabilities to infinite sets). Then the book gets really interesting! The author proposes that math does not model the universe, but that math IS the universe. The relations defined by a mathematical structure is all that is needed for us to believe all we see and feel is real. Nothing physical is needed. I really thought I was alone in being a strong proponent of this Mathematical Universe idea, so I have quite pleasantly surprised to find this excellent presentation. I was led to my conclusions by a much different path (Bell’s Theorem & Bell Test Experiments) and take these ideas to even greater extremes than Tegmark, but this is the best (the only?) popular presentations of these ideas I have seen.

It may just be awkward editing or just these ideas are heady stuff, but by the end of the book Tegmark seems a bit schizophrenic. He seems to reject continuums and infinities and randomness as unreal (which is what I think), but then he continues to refer to, and use, these as if they were real. Also a good new model in fundamental physics should address multiple issues in physics, but Tegmark does not use his ideas of the Mathematical Universe to clarify the understanding of quantum mechanics (particularly Bell’s Theorem) and the problem linking General Relativity and Quantum mechanics. I think Tegmark underestimated the depth of the Measure Problem. The underlying problem is in any reality, it is simply not possible to take a random sample from an infinite set. Thus any assignment of probability to such constructs is nonsense. Tegmark seems to still be hoping for a resolution of the Measure Problem.

The author has a really pleasant way of covering the history of cosmology, making the story like a mystery novel, using detective work to explain one mystery after another. Yet what makes this book really worth reading is the last quarter where the ideas about the Mathematical Universe are explored. I suspect that in a few hundred years the conception of the Mathematical Universe will be considered the great turning point leading to a final, simple and beautiful, Theory of Everything.

69 people found this helpful

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Main points are off the mark

The author really explains science very well. In the first half of the book when he's providing background and context he excels. He steps the listener through how we progressed through history from a village perspective to a multiverse. The author states elegantly, the reality of the multiverse is not a theory in of itself since it comes out of the best theory we have to describe our universe, Inflation Theory. If you accept that inflation describes the universe at a fundamental level, but don't like multiverses you need to first come up with a theory that can explain everything inflation does but take out the part where inflation creates other universes not an easy thing to do. Also, the book works well when he's explaining everything you every wanted to know about the Cosmic Microwave Background but were afraid to ask. It really does give good answers about flat space and dark energy and why it's so important to understand the CMB.

But, the author really didn't write the book to tell us those things. He wrote it for two main reasons. He wants to tell you why the Many World Hypothesis (Hugh Everett III) is the best explanation for the mysterious of physics and then goes on to tell you how our universe is mathematics.

I love math at least as much as the next geek and wish the universe was math, but I gave up those kind of thoughts a long time ago. As Confucius said (no, really he did!), he looked for truth in mathematics and studied it for five years before he realized truth laid elsewhere.

I'm not against using the Many World Hypothesis to explain the measurement problem but the approach the author used just was not convincing. I would strongly recommend the David Deutsch book, "The Beginning of Infinity" it covers the same kind of science but is much more coherent. I'll give a shout out to Tegmark, he quotes people like Deutsch and many others I have read and gives them kudos even though he doesn't agree with him throughout the book.

Another book, I would recommend instead is a science fiction book called "Thrice Upon a Time", by James P Hogan, he covers the Many World Hypothesis in a more consistent way than this book does. (Yes, it's fiction but uses science and speculation to explain).

Overall, the reason the author really wrote the book is the reasons I can't fully recommend this book.

66 people found this helpful

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An interesting and thought provoking hypothesis.

Max Tegmark does a great job of explaining complex physics and mathematical concepts in simple language. Anyone who finds this kind of subject matter interesting will appreciate his hypothesis. Rob Shapiro narrated the book superbly.

22 people found this helpful

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Took a long time to get to the point

I found this book disappointing, mainly because the author does not even begin to address his supposedly ground-breaking, controversial new theory until about 3/4 through the book. Everything before that is review. If you've studied physics and cosmology, or read a lot of Hawking, Greene, Mlodinow, etc., you will be bored through this part (which, I repeat, is most of the book). If this is the first book you've read on the subject, you might not mind this.

I will also say that Mr. Tegmark dips into some pretty far-out ideas from time to time, and I felt like he was trying to defend as science, some ideas that were plainly not science. Of course, he says they are science, so maybe I'm just wrong about that.

When he does finally get to talking about "Our Mathematical Universe" (there's a chapter in the book where he clearly announces something like "now I'm going to start talking about my new theory...". Again, that's about halfway through the second part of the audiobook), it's pretty interesting for a while. But it seemed like it quickly became hard to hold my attention to the reading. This may have been my own fault, but it seemed like he was just getting too far into fringe science for me, and kind of rambling. It's not that I reject his theory. Actually, he may be on to something (his "new theory" was covered briefly in one of Brian Greene's books, by the way, so it's not that new -- or maybe Greene got it from him?)

Anyway, I did find Mr. Tegmark's many anecdotes about his life as a student, a scientist and a father interesting and it was cool how he integrated his own experiences with the science he was presenting. I did feel that I learned some things from this book, so I can't give it that bad of a review.

In general, I would just warn the reader: if you're not new to physics and cosmology, be ready to wade through a LOT of review before getting to anything new.

16 people found this helpful

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Mind Expanding

Any additional comments?

Whether or not you believe the author's conclusions (he's not sure if he does so himself), you will be led on a road of exploration into the nature of the universe which will astonish you. The book is surprisingly easy to follow and immensely rewarding.

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AMEN-RA & ATKINS RENDER TEMARK'S MUSINGS OTIOSE

The present review takes the form of correspondence I was compelled to initiate with the author of "Our Mathematical Universe". It reads as follows:

Greetings Prof. Tegmark,

I found your book, Our Mathematical Universe, and your 1998 publication in the Annals of Physics most interesting. I will understand if you are inclined to ignore the analysis of your work that I endeavor to advance herein. After all, I am neither a physicist nor a mathematician. Rather, I am a philosophically oriented psychotherapist/thanatologist with a background in Biology and Epidemiology. As I find dissimulation objectionable, I shall not delay in disclosing my chief criticism: the theory/model that you propound in your book (and paper)—namely, the Mathematical Universe Hypothesis (MUH)—is not substantially novel in essence. I appreciate your appropriate invocation of Pythagoras, Plato, Galileo, and Eugene Wigner in chronicling the continuity of the mathematical description of nature. I am less appreciative of your apparent failure to acknowledge the fundamental unity between your ideas and that of renowned chemist, Sir Peter W. Atkins. Acknowledging my all-too-human egocentrism, I am even less appreciative of your failure to acknowledge my variant of the “Mathematical Universe Hypothesis” or what I call in my book (Mind, Matter, Mathematics, & Mortality (M4)) the Constitutional Interpretation of Mathematics or ‘Nunistic Numericism’. Sir Atkins offers an interpretation of mathematics that he calls Deep Structuralism. He contends that there are strong and weak variants of Deep Structuralism. However, as I argue in M4, these are essentially indistinguishable. Whereas, Weak Deep Structuralism maintains that nature is merely describable in mathematical terms, Strong Deep Structuralism maintains that nature and mathematics are one and the same, sharing the same structure. It is in this sense that your MUH is ostensibly intellectually subsumed by Atkins’ Deep Structuralism. Do not despair though. For as I argue in M4, Atkins’ idea is not an advancement over that of the Pythagoreans, Platonists, or any subsequent scientist, theorist or philosopher. Essentially, they have all said the same thing: ‘How extraordinary it is that the elements of existence are so amenable to mathematical analysis. An explanation is surely in order.’ What makes these nominally ‘numericist’ approaches otiose (the MUH included unfortunately) is their absence of empiricism. M4 begins by reminding readers that the ancient philosophical problem of reconciling mind and matter has theretofore yet to be accomplished. It further reminds readers of the conventional Cartesian conception of matter as encompassing entities exhibiting extension and, obversely, mind being characterized by the absence of extensibility. These definitions of Descartes still seem sound. M4 maintains that empirical evidence establishes that the fundamental constituents of matter are essentially infinitesimal point particles possessed purely of properties and that these properties (as you yourself soberly state) are mathematical in nature. [The Quark Model of Matter owing to the discovery of the MIT/SLAC team is the principal basis of this postulation.] If the elementary particles of which “matter” is composed are dimensionless, devoid of extension, they are then immaterial. The properties of these point particles are explicable on the basis of quantum mechanical wavefunctions—thoroughly mathematical entities. Moreover, this mathematical explicability may be epistemologically exhaustive, telling us all there is to know about the quantum realm. I maintain that it is only when elementary particles have been convincingly divested of materiality (on the basis of provisional empirical investigations) that the mathematical essence of existence can be established. This is why I maintain that the M4 dispensation of the “MUH”—Constitutional Nunistic Numericism (CNN)—is the most momentous, scientifically sound, most veridical variant of the mathematical interpretations of reality.

Then there is the question of conceptual fecundity. M4 maintains that the modified “Double Slit” experiment of quantum mechanics permits the interpretation that quantum particles exhibit awareness or a property closely akin thereto. I call this property ‘Proto-Percipience’. It would seem to explain why particles apparently alter their behavior, displaying wavelike or particulate properties depending on whether they are being “observed” or not—indeed, whether a detection device is directed thereat, whether such a device is “on” or “off”. Naturally, I argue that evolution employed this Proto-Percipient property in enabling the accretion of awareness in organisms owing to its adaptiveness. This conception, contingent upon the Copenhagen interpretation of wavefunction collapse, can be contrasted with your espousal of Everett’s parallel worlds perspective. Plainly speaking, it seems more plausible to postulate particle Proto-Percipience or rudimentary awareness than to contend that consciousness “splits” each time a quantum phenomenon is observed. Such ‘cosmic schizophrenia’ compels the creation of a universe, ex nihilo, each time a conscious agent makes a quantum observation entailing choice. This seems somewhat extravagant and rather inelegant. Finally, M4 maintains that the ultimate immateriality of matter, the essential ‘mathematicality’ of matter, the concomitant modularity of the mind and the singularity of the substance of the “soul” or “spirit” are integrated in such a way as to explain our irrepressible intimation of Immortality. This is what impels me to opine that M4 is not merely a mathematical and metaphysical Theory of Everything (TOE) but the most compelling and comprehensive of all competing cosmological theories.

I greatly appreciate your contributions to the field of physics and, indeed, to the advancement of human knowledge. As an admittedly obscure theorist I also appreciate your embodiment of the academic “Golden Mean”—that is, your decision to simultaneously pursue orthodox professional ideas deemed appropriate by the conventional community of physicists and explore “radical” research deviating from the restrictive domain of your discipline. I applaud and respect you. I also applaud your humanness and apparently authentic vulnerability. By your own admission you have been “scooped” in more than one instance. To many, it may be demoralizing to engage in exhaustive intellectual work only to learn that someone else has encapsulated and advanced the very ideas inherent in one’s own opus. Understandably, we covet recognition for our contributions. You have dealt with such occurrences admirably. As you state in Our Mathematical Universe, it helps to hope that in some multiplicity of parallel worlds you are indeed the originator of all those ideas that you conceived in this world.

I hope you do not object to my ending with a quote from M4. I think it reinforces our intellectual kinship.

“Lifting the veil of materiality from the face of Nature leads us not only to the unification of mind and matter but also to the unification of matter and mathematics. The rather unreasonable, otherwise inexplicable effectiveness with which mathematics describes physical phenomena is now seen to be a consequence of the identity of ‘physical’ entities and mathematical entities. In fact, the very concept of a mathematical entity is now arguably intelligible—mathematical entities and the physical entities they were once thought to merely symbolize are one and the same. One need no longer conceive of a parallel world of immaterial mathematical essences. Mathematical entities need not be relegated to a realm distinct from the space and time of our Universe. Immaterial mathematical entities comprise the substance of which boulders, bodies, and brains are built and brains are evolutionarily engineered organs that have acquired the capacity to comprehend the principles that govern their existence. We have hereby effectuated the integration of all Being into a seamless Whole. Mind, Matter, and Mathematics are One. Now what of Mortality....”

Mind, Matter, Mathematics, & Mortality (M4): Musings on a Momentous Metaphysical Theory (Dr. Nun Sava-Siva Amen-Ra, 2011)


A response would be most welcome as I truly value your ideas and perspective. I have taken the liberty of attaching my book. Thank you for your attention.

Kind regards,
Nun
18 January MMXIV

11 people found this helpful

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it depends on who YOU are

What did you like best about Our Mathematical Universe? What did you like least?

I am not a physicist, just educated in another side of science (I am a psychiatrist) and very interested in understanding the nature of reality. I was very impressed by the passion of the writer and that was satisfying. Most of the material covered went above my head (e.g. the entire concept of "level 4 multiverse"). However I enjoyed the little that I actually understood here and there. I think I would have liked it more if I were a physicist.

What did you like best about this story?

Mostly the passion for pursuit of reality.

What about Rob Shapiro’s performance did you like?

Excellent job!

Did Our Mathematical Universe inspire you to do anything?

Yes! read more books!

9 people found this helpful

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A brilliant book on physics

This book is just really brilliant. Such heavy science is explained with very simple words and metaphors. Highly recommended!

9 people found this helpful

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beautiful!

If Sean Carroll, Vlatko Vedral, and Richard Feynman morphed into one person and wrote a book, I think it might look something like this book. I loved every page. Without question, this was one of my favorite books about the universe.

Lately I have been interested in information theory. Reading multiple books on the same subject, there is always the danger of becoming bored. After reading other books on the subject, I read this book and Island of Knowledge by Gleiser at the same time. Both of these books were excellent. Both books had a good deal of overlap but were markedly different in important ways. Rather than being repetitive, they served more to reinforce important ideas. The time I spent getting familiar with these books (often reading chapters over and over again) was deeply, deeply enjoyable.

Tegmark's sprinkling of biographical information along side his tutorials on basic and complex concepts in physics reminded me a lot of Feynman, if Feynman had been humble. Tegmark's gift for making the complex accessible to non-physicists reminded me of Carroll's gift in relating to all types of audiences. The subject matter in this book reminded me of Vedral's decoding reality, but it delved in a bit more at times and provided a richer over all experience, which felt more satisfying.

Tegmark provides one of the simplest and most beautiful descriptions of how each thing (be it atom, star, person, etc) is merely a compilation of smaller things that can ultimately be thought about ( and indeed do exist) as tiny bits of information. For sure, this argument has been made many times before, but I enjoyed Tegmark's argument to a surprising degree.

This was one of the most satisfying reading experiences I have had in a long time. When Tegmark related his Jekyll and Hyde story and then got into the meat of his argument, my brain was in a constant state of euphoria. Braingasm, braingasm, braingasm! I could feel the dopamine rush as he flooded my brain with idea after idea. While at university, I used to sit and talk with two of my best friends, and intellectual soulmates, about the ultimate nature of the universe. These times are some of my most treasured memories in life. Reading this book was like being back in those conversations.

6 people found this helpful

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Making Reality Real

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Definitely if they have an interest in both physics and philosophy and how they intersect.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

I especially liked the chapter concerning: Internal Reality, External Reality and Consensus Reality. I also liked the way the author summarized his main concepts at the end of each chapter.

Any additional comments?

This book isn't for everyone, but is ideal for someone who wants to seriously explore some of the ultimate questions. Although it is technical in content, with some effort it can be understood by a non-science type such as myself. Although I don't usually do so, this book may get a second listen from me.

4 people found this helpful

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  • Simon Gibson
  • 03-30-14

Test Your Little Grey Cells

What made the experience of listening to Our Mathematical Universe the most enjoyable?

The first half of the book gives you a history of cosmology and its associated mathematics. The second half is Max Tegmark's theory of the Big Bang and what came after.

What did you like best about this story?

A very clear explanation of the theorys of the cosmos and the problems of interpreting what is observed and calculated.

What does Rob Shapiro bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

Rob Shapiro, the voice actor, gives a very well paced and clear performance of the text.

Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

Max Tegmark can be profound, humourus and very honest.

Any additional comments?

A great book that furthers the understanding of the origin and future of our cosmos.

9 people found this helpful

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  • Zad Flappentash
  • 04-08-16

I'd pay extra for Shapiro

The narrator Rob is absolutely excellent and has clearly read through the material first. I hope he carries on doing more. It would actually sway my decision to purchase another title.

I haven't finished the book yet so will update when I do - but at chapter 4 I am enthralled and engaged and thoroughly enjoying.

I usually bombard myself with lectures (yes, self inflicted - I am old enough to have left school with O levels and not bothered with much more that wasn't earning money.)

This narrative is kind of personal and he makes no apologies for that. Not in rude way but sets out his stall early doors that he is not going to try to "balance" his theories by reciting 10 others. It's actually quite refreshing.

Well written and well read.


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  • G
  • 03-21-14

An entertaining explanation of fascinating ideas.

Any additional comments?

I've been troubled by super positioning, boson fields and the time space continuum for quite a while now. Max Tegmark describes all of this eloquently and explains his thoughts on matters that I had not yet considered. During the read I experienced very brief moments of absolute clarity. So much so that I was able to expand some of the hypothesis into unchartered dimensions with my own original concepts. Of course I have forgotten all of them now, but the thought that I might be a Boltzmann brain remains disturbing. Top marks for Rob Shapiro the narrator as well. I will certainly revisit all 15 hours of this book again.

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  • Jan W. H. Schnupp
  • 07-06-14

Enjoyable trip through spacetime - no maths needed

I'm about 2/3rds through and am enjoying this book greatly. It provides a clear and accessible account of modern cosmology. Finally I understand why some people are very excited by measurements of cosmic microwave background radiation. The title may make you wonder whether this book will be hard work, but I didn't think so. You certainly don't have to do equations. Even though the subject matter (multiverses, general relativity & similar) may seem heavy going, the writing style of the book is quite chatty and enthusiastic, so it doesn't feel like work. And the narrator has a lovely smooth voice and reads with nice emphasis.

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  • Jack worsfold
  • 12-18-20

Max Tegmarks style is wonderful

If you know of Max Tegmark he has always been a bit of a black sheep in the worlkd of theoretical physics. Here he uses math to provide concepts of how our universe really is. A lot of the bok talks about the differing types of multiverse and whilst there is a fair amount of supposition in the book it really works. Tegmark is childlike in his joy about physics and its infectious. A great read and very funny too. Great Performance by Rob Shapiro too! spot on....

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  • Matt
  • 10-07-20

Incredible - and not just for mathematicians

I came to Our Mathematical Universe from another Tegmark work, Life 3.0 (which I also highly recommend).

The title of this book had me a little worried at first - because I've always struggled with mathematics. But I needn't have worried. This isn't a book of equations - but rather perhaps a book about equations. As a non-scientist, and non-mathematician, I found the material to be well explained. I feel I now understand concepts like quantum superposition reasonably well. And really, when you arrive at the final section, where Tegmark argues (spoiler) that education will save us all, that's probably the purpose of the book.

I've been thinking about a lot of the problems described in this book since I was a child - and for the first time I feel like I might have gotten close to some answers. What are the limits of our universe? How far does it extend, and how fine does its resolution go? It's really inspiring stuff.

And because it's written by Tegmark, there's an enjoyable drama here too. I found myself getting genuinely angry while the author described the treatment of Hugh Everett III by his fellow physicists. As someone who left academia rather disillusioned myself, this struck a personal chord for me.

If you're interested in the big questions, then I wholeheartedly recommend Our Mathematical Universe. Some of the ideas here sound pretty crazy at first, but then again, so is our existence itself (as the book will tell you). I'll be revisiting this one for sure - as well as seeking out a lot of the other books Tegmark recommends here.

I didn't find this quite as easy to follow as Life 3.0, and there was a point where I really struggled to keep up (about 75% of the way through). I don't know how many times I hit rewind so that I could get a better understanding of something. But it was very much worth it - I enjoyed every minute. 9/10. Very, very good stuff.

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  • MR Nathan Gallagher
  • 04-09-20

I’m not an academic by any means

I *think* I understood most of this book, which is to say that I felt like my brain was in a pub fight whilst getting a careful manicure.

Weirdly would thoroughly recommend

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  • Kindle Customertg
  • 01-16-18

A Must

The best listen as far. Gone through many books etc on physics and this is a breath of fresh air. new perspectives on things and not a history lesson like others..

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  • Mattuso
  • 11-07-17

A beautiful journey from start to end

This is a fascinating take on modern physics and it's application to our existence. Expert or not, this is an important work for everyone with even the slightest interest in the subject. Difficult concepts are explained well enough for even a non expert like me to gain a rough grasp.

Narration was faultless and added a friendly quality to the piece. Truly excellent in every respect.

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  • Dhyano
  • 01-13-17

Stretch your mind into multidimensional realities.

Would you consider the audio edition of Our Mathematical Universe to be better than the print version?

It is certainly better in case the reader is blind. I generally prefer audio editions because I'm slightly dyslexic and it takes me ages to read a book. But in this case I think I will take a look at the printed version too.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Our Mathematical Universe?

At the end of the last chapter when it says that us, fellow travelers of the blue planet spaceship can make a difference if we put our resources into the right direction.

What about Rob Shapiro’s performance did you like?

It was impeccable and so brilliantly capable to deliver onto an emotional level highly complex abstract constructs of ideas.

Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

Yes both. I've found hilarious many episode narrated and very emotional the end of the book.

Any additional comments?

This is a book that opens the door to a vast 'youniverse'. It's the beginning of a fascinating series of readings and research that will expand not only my knowledge but also my ability to look at the incredible potential of human awareness.

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  • Gordon
  • 08-02-16

Stunning analysis from the biggest perspective

On this listen journey I truly loved hearing of the author's brilliant understandingly of the extent of our observable universe thanks to his work on the mapping of the plasma sphere. Indeed the Planck map of the observable universe that adorns the cover of the book is now the background picture to my laptop. It is a great way to discuss the content of the book with my family and friends who all state at the screen in wonder after I explain what it represents. For those who are not already familiar with the Planck map of the universe, the knowledge imparted in this book is incredibly worthwhile for that reason alone.

I could only follow or buy into ~50% of the author's theories on the Multiverse/MUH. That being said - I could appreciate the significant and caring approach to his analysis.

I loved the ending as it seemed to tie in all the vastness of the universe with the honest assessment of the author's own reason for being - and similarly why we should really care about the brilliant analysis that he has clearly work so hard to share with us.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Jason
  • 02-17-16

Great Narrator

Best narrator for nonfiction science I have ever heard.
Really great content as well from Tegmark.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Anonymous User
  • 11-09-21

Two thirds

I had no understanding of what was happening in this book in two thirds of all parallel universes.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Shane
  • 12-16-17

great book tnx Max.

starting my 2nd listining through now. trying to get my head around the stimulation story.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Praveen
  • 10-26-16

loved it

Good to know about universe with a different perspective. Raised the curiosity to next level.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • StuartR
  • 10-14-16

Thought provoking

Great audiobook. Fascinating ideas and great style of writing. Loses a bit in the end but 95% (or 59% in the level 2 multiverse), is interesting and thought provoking. Highly recommended

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • David
  • 09-12-16

mind expanding

narration is hypnotic, highlighting difficult concepts with apparent ease.
thanks max! MUH for the win :)

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Ryan
  • 09-04-16

really good

this book is pretty serious, I zoned out for a lot of the level 4 multi verse stuff. the book is really well written and the narrator is absolutely amazing, by far the best narrator on audible I've listen to so far

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Reza
  • 07-24-16

Mind blowing!

The content is complex obviously because of the subject but really mind blowing! Performance is superb.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
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  • Anonymous User
  • 08-01-21

Too Hard for Me

I was never a mathematician but I've always had an interest in the big questions so I thought I'd give this a go. And I did for about 10 hours. I wasn't worried when I couldn't understand a lot of the finer points because I could follow the thread of the story and enjoyed it. But in the end it just became too much for me and I stopped. That shouldn't put anybody off if you're interested, give it a listen and see how you go but it just became too abstract for me.
The narration is exceptional and the examples to explain some of the principles are very good. Kudos to Max for making this topic even approachable for someone like me and in the end I might go back to it to see how the story ends, but perhaps not.

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