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Publisher's Summary

"I have been in the Heaven that takes up most of his light, and saw things there that those who descend from that height cannot speak of or forget…."

Led by his guide, Beatrice, Dante leaves the Earth behind and soars through the heavenly spheres of Paradise. In this third and final part of The Divine Comedy, he encounters the just rulers and holy saints of the Church. The horrors of the Inferno and the trials of Purgatory are left far behind. Ultimately, in Paradise, Dante is granted a vision of God’s Heavenly court: the angels, the Blessed Virgin, and God Himself.

Public Domain (P)2004 Naxos AudioBooks

What listeners say about Paradise: From The Divine Comedy

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Outstanding

This book is read very well. It has tracks for every canto so you can skip easily back to any verse. There are no explanations between cantos, just the translations form this masterful story.

5 people found this helpful

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The return of the Jedi of epic poetry

I am leaving a review via Siri, so if something doesn’t make sense that is why. While the first two parts of the divine comedy are excellent, nuanced, and beautiful friend interested in the genre, the third part dolls heavily into Italian politics of that time and place, the 13th century.Alas, I am not in the 13th century so much of what is happening is lost on me. The narrator is incredible though, and I chalk up much of the books disinteresting nature to my own ignorance.