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Publisher's Summary

We live in complicated, dangerous times. They are also hyper-technical times. As citizens who will elect future presidents of the most powerful and influential world, we need to know - truly understand, not just rely on television's talking heads - if Iran's nascent nuclear capability is a genuine threat to the West, if biochemical weapons are likely to be developed by terrorists, if there are viable alternatives to fossil fuels that should be nurtured and supported by the government, if nuclear power should be encouraged, and if global warming is actually happening.

Written in everyday, nontechnical language, Physics for Future Presidents explains the science behind the concerns that our nation faces in the immediate future. Even active readers of serious journalism will be surprised at the lessons contained herein. It is must-have information for all presidents - and citizens - of the 21st century.

©2006 Richard A. Muller (P)2011 Tantor

Critic Reviews

"Should be required reading for all informed citizens, as well as Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, and John McCain." ( Publishers Weekly)

What listeners say about Physics for Future Presidents

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  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Read this one instead of listening to it

The book refers to graphs and tables and pictures that would have been interesting to see and until the audio format technology allows for them to show on the devise you're listening on, I'd go for the actual printed book. That being said, the content is interesting and I learned a lot.

10 people found this helpful

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PHYSICS TRUTH AND FICTION

“Physics for Future Presidents” suggests that 21st century Presidents must understand some physics to be effective leaders. Richard Muller’s premise for understanding physics gives license to the author to explore everything from manned space flight, to satellite surveillance, to terrorist use of nuclear bombs.

Muller begins his book with the modern world’s effort to understand and contain terrorism. Muller explores the possibility of a terrorist organization building a nuclear bomb and detonating it in the middle of an American City. He looks at the possibility from three perspectives. One, difficulty in acquiring fissionable material; two, difficulty of building a nuclear device and three, difficulty in delivering a weapon of mass destruction to a desired location. Miller suggests a greater danger is terrorist attack by private planes, loaded with highly flammable fuel, e.g. 9/11. Or, for a terrorist organization to use chemical and biological agents that directly or indirectly infect population centers.

The physics that Muller insists Presidents must understand is that scientific proof is a matter of probability; not absolute certainty. Muller warns Presidents to not be misled by cherry-picking fact finders that have political objectives that are not grounded by the truth of science. One may conclude from Muller's book that even if there is no certainty in science, knowing probabilities offer a basis for informed decision.

3 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars

must read for all open minded people

A very valuable compilation of important facts bearing on important issues which are presented in an accessible format. In my view, these are presented as objectively and non-ideologically as is reasonably possible and for that reason the book is likely to draw attacks from both the far left and the far right. This is especially likely to be true for the chapters on global warming. On the one hand, it debunks many of the distortions and hyperbole of the doomsday alarmists, especially Al Gore in 'An Inconvenient Truth.' On the other, it does accept the likelihood that global warming is occurring, is probably largely man-caused and should be addressed, but only in ways that make sense and not by following many of the programs of this administration and the green fanatics, like electric cars, ethanol subsidies and extensive investment in solar power.

12 people found this helpful

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Good information, a little dated.

Any additional comments?

It is good to listen to and will give some good background information. With the rapid progression of technology and evolution of world economics, I feel it needs some updating.

3 people found this helpful

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Very informative examination of various topics

Where does Physics for Future Presidents rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Ranking it relative to the other books I have listened to would be too difficult, as comparing this to philosophy books, investment books, fiction books, and social sciences would be a hard comparison. This is one of the better science books I have read or listened to...:)

What did you like best about this story?

It is broken down into various subjects/chapters... examining (from a scientific perspective) questions of energy, nuclear weapons, global climate change, etc... there was a lot here that I did not know, and it is interesting to step aside from the economic and political interests, and see some of these topics from just a scientific perspective.

Which scene was your favorite?

Discussing the benefits and difficulties of 'alternate energy', ideas about conservation, and the actual effect if terrorists got a hold of a nuclear bomb.

1 person found this helpful

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Awesome

This book should be required reading, listening, for highschool kids!

Its very good and can be enjoyed by any level of education and political leaning.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

Essential to all decision makers.

Could do with an update, much has changed since ~2010, but that does not change the main point that one cannot and should not argue eith the laws of physics.
Even more salient in the age of fake news and the erosion or trust in 'experts', is the way this book does not "appeal to authority" but explains clearly the underlying principles behind thorny topics like energy, nuclear weapons and climate change.
Think of this book as a first-class course in "bullshit detection".

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    4 out of 5 stars

A very good and factual discussion.

I greatly appreciate the separation of science, policy, and opinion through most of the book.
The narrator does an excellent work of communicating the information within as I would read the material.

From a platform perspective it would have been helpful to have an accompanying document containing the illustrations.

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Great read!

I enjoyed this book so much that I bought a physical copy! it is on its way now!

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    5 out of 5 stars

Informative

I have read many similar books to this one , although I was surprised at some of the relevant insights discussed herein.